Info Source: Institutional Functions, Programs and Activities

Below you will find information about ten key programs at Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). Descriptions of the programs and activities, and the related Classes of Records can be found under each major heading. Personal Information Banks (PIBs) are listed under the corresponding Classes of Records, if applicable. This section also includes information on Internal Services, Classes of Personal Information, and IRCC’s Manuals.

Permanent Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the focus of this Program is on the selection and processing of immigrants who can support the development of a strong and prosperous Canada, in which the benefits of immigration are shared across all regions of Canada. The acceptance of qualified permanent residents helps the government meet its economic objectives, such as building a skilled workforce, addressing immediate and longer term labour market needs, and supporting national and regional labour force growth. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Federal Skilled Workers

The Federal Skilled Worker Program is the Government of Canada’s main selection system for skilled immigration, accounting for roughly 30% of all new permanent residents annually. The Program uses a “points system” to identify prospective immigrants with the ability to economically establish in Canada, based on their human capital (education, skilled work experience, language skills, etc.). The goal of the Program is to select immigrants who will make a long-term contribution to Canada's national and structural labour market needs, in support of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

General – Admissibility

Description: General information relating to and in support of the Admissibility Branch activities (i.e. identity and document policy, admissibility policy, security files, program integrity, visa policy, information sharing and branch participation in a number of domestic and international fora to develop coordinated strategies and foster cooperation).

Document Types: Letters, briefing notes, ministerial correspondence, policies, directives, manuals, forms, operational memoranda on the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and Regulations, proposed amendments thereto, historical amendments and regulatory impact analysis statements (RIAS), and other related statutory instruments; legislative and regulatory policy relating to admissibility. Topics covered include but are not limited to: international partnerships including reciprocal arrangements with the United States; the Canada-US Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness Declaration; discussions with Five Country Conference partners related to information sharing; identity policy, including biometric policy; electronic travel authorization; visa and document policy issues related to persons seeking entry to Canada; policies, directives and reports on quality assurance and anti-fraud activities; issues pertaining to security and intelligence; negotiation of international and domestic information sharing agreements.

Record Number: CIC ASB 023

Intergovernmental and Stakeholder Relations

Description: Policy documents, briefing notes, correspondences, intergovernmental agreements.

Document Types: Material related to federal-provincial relations regarding immigration policies and procedures, such as reciprocal agreements, memoranda of agreement, exchange of information, consultation papers or amendments to policies and procedures; internal briefing material and correspondence. Material relating to stakeholder relations, such as briefing material, policy documents and correspondence.

Record Number: CIC ACB 008

International Service

Description: Information on matters relating to the delivery of IRCC’s immigration programs abroad.

Document Types: Case files created in response to applications or enquiries made under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act which have some component handled by IRCC operations outside of Canada; cost recovery related to visa operations abroad; administration of IRCC offices abroad including, for instance, management of the Visa Application Centre Network (VAC), budgets, positions, supplies of equipment and forms; program integrity at offices outside of Canada; planning and implementation concerning policy, operations and support at IRCC offices abroad; reporting and liaison related to IRCC interests including international migration, multilateral organizations and bilateral relations; logistical support of some international travel from IRCC headquarters; human resource management related to International Region.

Record Number: CIC AOB 001

Permanent Economic Residents

Description: This file may contain some or all of the following types of information: applications for permanent residence and refugee status, assessments by immigration officers, details concerning health, past criminality, financial status, education and professional experience, removal documentation and temporary resident permit, including computer-based information (Field Operations Support System (FOSS), Computer-Assisted Immigration Processing System (CAIPS), Case Processing System (CPS), e-mail). The file may contain information on an immigrant’s earlier status in Canada (e.g. work permit information, etc.). It may include all or part of the same information regarding any other person named in the application. It may include information on the sponsor and information from the Foreign Students Records and Case File-CIC PPU 051. It may include information from the Temporary Worker Records and Case File – CIC PPU 054. It may include information from the Visitor Case File – CIC PPU 055. It may also include the name and address of bond depositor, sum deposited, terms and conditions imposed, name of person signing bond, name of persons bonded, terms and conditions which they must meet, and acknowledgement of terms and conditions. It may also include decisions for pre-removal risk assessments, danger opinions and rehabilitation assessments.

Document Types: Client Immigration case paper file.

Record Number: CIC AOB 005

Notes: Persons seeking access to this information bank must supply their date of birth, approximate date of entry into Canada and port of entry.

Centralized Processing Pilot Project

Description: Information on matters relating to the Centralized Processing Pilot Project.

Document Types: Pilot design and evaluation, pilot procedures, reports and statistics relating to the new Global Case Management System (GCMS).

Record Number: CIC ASB 019

Litigation Information Management System (LIMS)

Description: The Litigation Information Management System (LIMS) contains information concerning litigation on citizenship and immigration cases related to litigation, and is accessible only to employees of Litigation Management Division (BCL)/Case Management Branch and employees of Litigation Management Section (LMS)/National Security Division/CBSA. The information relates to the limited number of finalized and/or pending litigation cases which have been referred to BCL in accordance with established guidelines. LIMS contains personal information concerning the applicant/respondent such as the name, country of citizenship, FOSS ID number, as well as a general description of the nature and status of the litigation. It also contains fields which allow for limited searches related to types of cases, issues and other flags, as required. As Litigation Management’s principal responsibility is to provide instruction on behalf of IRCC and CBSA to the Department of Justice with regard to the conduct of litigation, summaries of consultation with legal counsels and other IRCC officials, strategies for defending decisions and subsequent instructions to Justice are entered into LIMS, which is therefore subject to litigation privilege and/or legal advice privilege.

Document Types: Case processing information, reports.

Record Number: CIC APB 019

Québec Skilled Workers

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and to issue permanent resident visas. The Quebec Skilled Workers (QSW) Program uses specific criteria to identify immigrants with the human capital and skills needed to economically establish in Quebec. Similar to the Federal Skilled Worker Program, applicants to the QSW are assessed according to their age, education, work experience, language proficiency (in French), and enhanced settlement prospects (previous education or work experience in Canada, or a confirmed job offer). The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Provincial and Territorial Nominees

The Provincial Nominee Program supports the Government of Canada’s objective for the benefits of immigration to be shared across all regions of Canada. Bilateral immigration agreements are in place with all provinces and territories except Nunavut and Quebec,Footnote 1 conferring on their governments the authority to identify and nominate for permanent residence immigrants who will meet local economic development and regional labour market needs, and who wish to settle in that specific province or territory. As part of the nomination process, provincial and territorial governments assess the skills, education and work experience of prospective candidates to ensure that nominees can make an immediate economic contribution to the nominating province or territory. IRCC retains the final selection authority and verifies that nominees can economically establish in Canada and meet all admissibility requirements before issuing permanent resident visas. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Live-in Caregivers

The Live-in Caregiver program allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign workers in private residences to provide care for children, elderly persons or persons with a disability. Eligible applicants come to Canada as temporary foreign workers, subject to their employer obtaining a neutral or positive Labour Market Opinion (LMO) from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. The LMO considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available and the wage and working conditions being offered. The critical component of the program distinguishing it from the general pool of Temporary Foreign Workers is the requirement for the caregiver to reside in their place of employment. The program is also unique in that foreign workers arriving in Canada under the program are eligible to apply for permanent residence after two years or 3,900 hours of fulltime employment within four years of their arrival in Canada. They are granted permanent residence as part of the Live-in Caregiver category of the Economic Class, with established room under the Annual Levels Plan. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Canadian Experience Class

The Canadian Experience Class was introduced in 2008 as a path to permanent residence for those with eligible work experience in Canada, usually obtained as a result of temporary residence as a foreign worker or international student. The Program is complementary to the Federal Skilled Worker Program but uses simplified criteria, including eligible skilled Canadian work experience and a minimum level of proficiency in English or French. The Program provides a streamlined and usually faster route to permanent residence for those who have already established themselves in skilled work in Canada. This allows Canada to retain talented workers who have already contributed to the Canadian economy. The Program has two streams – one tailored for Temporary Foreign Workers wishing to transition to permanent residence, and the other for recent post-secondary graduates with eligible work experience. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Federal Business Programs

This Program seeks to attract experienced business people to Canada who will support the development of a strong and prosperous economy. There are three streams of business immigrants in Canada: investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons. The Immigrant Investor stream brings business capital to Canada and distributes these resources across the country in cooperation with participating provinces. The Entrepreneur stream contributes to economic development through business and employment creation. The Self-employed stream selects persons with the intention and ability to be self-employed in Canada, thereby making a contribution to specified activities in our economy. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Business Immigration

Description: General correspondence, regulations, guidelines, policies and procedures relating to the administration of the immigrant investor, entrepreneur and self-employed programs. Project files for proposals submitted under the immigrant investor program, including copies of private placement offerings, monitoring records and reports, correspondence, marketing materials, etc.

Document Types: Policies and procedures relating to the admission of persons under the Entrepreneur/Investor/Self-Employed categories. Monitoring funds invested and general use of funds (pre 1999).

Record Number: CIC ASB 010

Quebec Business Immigrants

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and issue permanent resident visas. This Program seeks to attract experienced investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons to the province of Quebec, to support the development of a strong and prosperous economy in Quebec. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.


Temporary Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the focus of this Program is on processing and facilitating the entry into Canada of temporary foreign workers and international students. Temporary economic migration enhances Canada’s trade, commerce, cultural, educational and scientific activities, in support of our overall economic and social prosperity. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas, work permits and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

International Students

IRCC supports a range of goals for immigration by facilitating the entry of international students to Canada. International students contribute to Canada’s educational and international competitiveness, and strengthen our educational institutions. International students are selected by these institutions according to their criteria, and IRCC facilitates their presence in Canada to work and study by issuing study permits and, where necessary, visas, which allow them to obtain a Canadian education. IRCC is responsible for ensuring that the proper documentation, financial, and security requirements are met, including the bona fides, or honest intentions, of all applicants. In order to provide the opportunity of the benefit of Canadian work experience, work permits are issued to qualified international students under IRCC’s On-Campus, Off-Campus and Co-op/Internship Work Permit components. Students who want to work in Canada after graduation can apply for a work permit under the Post-Graduation Work Permit (PGWP) component, which allows them to gain up to three years of valuable Canadian work experience. Some PGWP holders of work permits will also be eligible to apply for permanent residence under the Canadian Experience Class or other programs. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

International Student Programs

Description: Information concerning regulatory requirements and policies related to the temporary admission of foreign nationals to study or work in Canada.

Document Types: Analysis and policies related to the determination of applications for temporary entry of international students to Canada. Partnership arrangements with provinces and territories; and program integrity measures for temporary foreign workers.

Format: These records are shared with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). Formerly CIC IVR 001.

Record Number: CIC ASB 009

Foreign Student Permit Statistics

Description: Annual reporting on temporary resident permits (Minister’s permits); statistics on the number of student and work permits.

Document Types: Number of temporary resident permits (Minister’s permits) issued annually; number of study permits, and student related work permits issued.

Record Number: CIC ASB 017

Notes: These records may be shared with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

Temporary Foreign Workers

The Temporary Foreign Worker (TFW) Program allows employers to hire foreign nationals on a temporary basis. The Program contributes to the competitiveness and viability of Canadian businesses, since workers are recruited by employers or agencies to address labour or skill supply shortages. The Federal Government’s role is to facilitate the entry of foreign nationals to work, scrutinizing the job offer to ensure it is both consistent with our goals for economic immigration and has a neutral or positive effect on the Canadian labour market. In fulfilling this role, in order to hire a temporary worker some employers may require a Labour Market Opinion (LMO) from Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, which considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available and the wage and working conditions being offered. Once in possession of the LMO (if required), the applicant may then apply for the work permit at a mission abroad, at the port of entry (if eligible) or inside Canada (if eligible). The foreign national must meet all admissibility and eligibility requirements. There are a number of different streams under the TFW. One of these is the Live-in Caregiver Program, which allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign nationals to live and work in their private residence to provide care for children, the elderly and the disabled. The Seasonal Agricultural Worker component facilitates hiring workers from countries with these agreements with Canada. If an LMO is not required, such as for reciprocal employment exchanges, intra-company transfers, international agreements (including North American Free Trade Agreement, bilateral youth exchange agreements and other exceptions), the foreign national applies directly to IRCC for a work permit and visa, and IRCC considers the genuineness of the job offer and ensures the foreign national meets all admissibility and eligibility requirements. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas and work permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Visitor and Temporary Worker Programs

Description: Information concerning regulatory requirements and policies related to the temporary admission of foreign nationals to visit or work in Canada.

Document Types: Analysis and policies related to the determination of applications for temporary entry of visitors, live-in caregivers and other temporary workers to Canada. Partnership arrangements with provinces and territories; and program integrity measures for temporary foreign workers.

Format: These records are shared with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). Formerly CIC IVR 001.

Record Number: CIC ASB 012

Temporary Worker Permits Statistics

Description: Annual reporting on temporary resident permits (Minister’s permits); statistics on the number of work permits.

Document Types: Number of temporary resident permits (Minister’s permits) issued annually; number of work permits issued to temporary foreign workers.

Record Number: CIC ASB 018

Notes: These records may be shared with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).


Family and Discretionary Immigration

IRCC’s Family and Discretionary programs support the Government of Canada’s social goals for immigration. The Program objectives are to reunite family members and to allow for the processing of exceptional cases. Family Class provisions of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada to apply to sponsor eligible members of the family class, including spouses and partners, dependent children, and parents and grandparents. Discretionary provisions in the legislation are used in cases where there are humanitarian and compassionate considerations or for public policy reasons. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional and deserving cases not anticipated in the legislation and to support the Government of Canada in its humanitarian response to world events and crises. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa or granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification

The objective of this Program is to grant permanent resident status to foreign nationals who are the sponsored spouses, partners and dependent children (including adopted children) of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This supports the Government’s objective to reunite close family members while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. The sponsor, who is a permanent resident or Canadian citizen, is responsible for providing the basic needs of their spouse or partner for 3 years, and for their dependent children for up to 10 years. Processing involves determining the sponsor’s ability to meet the sponsorship obligations and verifying the bona fides of the relationships. Given the close family relationships involved, these family members are the highest priority for processing. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa or granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Family Class Immigration: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification

Description: Information concerning regulatory requirements related to the sponsorship of members of the family class of children (including adopted children), and the spouse or common-law partner in-Canada class.

Document Types: Policies related to the assessment of applications for sponsorship of members of the family classes and public policy consideration.

Record Number: CIC ASB 013

Case Processing Centre System - Family Class: Spouses, Partners and Children

Description: The CPC system supports the processing of all Family Class sponsorships submitted in support of foreign nationals overseas as well as all in-Canada applications for the following: in-Canada sponsorship of family class for spouses, partners and Children Reunification; extension of temporary resident status; applications for permanent resident status; applications based on humanitarian and compassionate grounds and applications for permanent resident cards.

Document Types: Case processing information, reports.

Record Number: CIC APB 012

Parents and Grandparents Reunification

The objective of this Program is to grant permanent resident status to sponsored foreign nationals who are the parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This Program makes it possible for Canadian citizens and permanent residents to be reunited with their extended family members, while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. Sponsors must demonstrate that they can meet their sponsorship obligations, which include providing for the basic needs of their parents and grandparents for 10 years. Particular sponsorship requirements and a lower processing priority distinguish this category from the spouses, partners and dependent children category. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Family Class Immigration: Parents and Grandparents Reunification

Description: Information concerning regulatory requirements related to the sponsorship of members of the family class of parents and grandparents.

Document Types: Policies related to the assessment of applications for sponsorship of members of the family classes and public policy consideration.

Record Number: CIC ASB 014

Case Processing Centre System – Family Class: Parents and Grandparents

Description: The CPC system supports the processing of all Family Class sponsorships submitted in support of foreign nationals overseas as well as all in-Canada applications for the following: in-Canada sponsorship of family class for parents and grandparents; extension of temporary resident status; applications for permanent resident status; applications based on humanitarian and compassionate grounds and applications for permanent resident cards.

Document Types: Case processing information, reports.

Record Number: CIC APB 013

Humanitarian & Compassionate Public Policy Considerations to Address Exceptional Circumstances

The humanitarian and compassionate and public policy provisions of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act enable the Minister to address exceptional circumstances by granting an exception to any criteria or obligations of the Act or by granting permanent residence. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional cases which were not envisioned in the legislation. An applicant’s circumstances are assessed on a case-by-case basis, taking into account establishment in Canada, the best interests of a child, and other relevant circumstances brought forward for consideration. The public policy provision is a discretionary tool designed to grant permanent or temporary resident status to individuals in similar circumstances, all of whom must meet eligibility criteria defined in the public policy. The outcome of this Program is that exceptional cases are treated with appropriate flexibility, in accordance with Canadian values. The selection and processing involve the issuance of a permanent resident visa or granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.


Refugee Protection

The Refugee Protection program is in the first instance about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted. One arm of the program starts overseas where refugees and persons in refugee-like situations are selected by Canadian visa officers to be resettled as permanent residents to Canada. Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, the in-Canada asylum system evaluates the claims of individuals seeking asylum in Canada and grants protected person status when a positive decision is rendered by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada.

Government-Assisted Refugees

Working closely with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees or other referral agencies, Canadian visa officers within the Government-Assisted Refugees (GARs) Program identify and select as permanent residents, members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada when there is no other durable solution available within a reasonable period of time. The primary objective of the Program is to affirm Canada’s humanitarian commitment to assist refugees in need of international protection through the provision of governmental assistance and to assist the countries hosting them through responsibility sharing.

Privately Sponsored Refugees

The primary objective of the Privately Sponsored Refugees program is to affirm Canada’s commitment to providing durable solutions to more refugees than would otherwise be admitted under the Government-Assisted Refugees program. Canadian visa officers select as permanent residents members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada who are referred by private sponsors. These private sponsors then provide the social, financial and emotional support to the refugees upon their arrival in Canada. The program is unique as it ensures an additional number of refugees are offered protection over and above those sponsored by the government.

In-Canada Asylum

Flowing from Canada's international and domestic legal obligations, Canada's asylum system provides protection to persons fleeing persecution and risk of torture, risk to life, or risk of cruel or unusual treatment or punishment, by way of legislative and regulatory measures that enable Canada to meet those obligations. The program establishes fair and efficient procedures that uphold Canada’s respect for the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all human beings, while maintaining the overall integrity of the system. Canada’s asylum system includes the determination of eligibility for referral to a refugee hearing at the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada and the granting of protected person status to those determined by the Board to be Convention refugees or persons in need of protection (note: protected persons may apply for permanent residence). The system also provides for a pre-removal risk assessment to certain persons who are facing removal from Canada.

Refugee Determination

Description: Records related to the process of making a claim for refugee status in Canada or submitting an application for a Pre-Removal Risk Assessment. Records may include information related to the control of persons claiming refugee status in Canada, the terms and conditions of their stay, including welfare, legal aid and employment.

Document Types: Policies, procedures, terms and conditions, other types of documents that would relate to this activity.

Record Number: CIC ASB 008

Refugees and Displaced Persons [C10]

Description: Records related to the admission of refugees and internally displaced persons. Records may include information related to emergency situations, guarantees for sponsorship, and background on information exchange programs between IRCC and Canadian, provincial or international governments and agencies.

Document Types: Policies, procedures, criteria for admission, other types of documents that would relate to this activity.

Record Number: CIC ASB 007

Pre-removal Risk Assessment

In accordance with its commitment to the principle of non-refoulement, IRCC offers a risk assessment to many persons facing removal from Canada. The principle of non-refoulement holds that people should not be removed to a country where they would be at risk of a danger of torture, a risk to their life, or a risk of cruel and unusual treatment or punishment. Under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, people who have been issued a removal order must formally apply to IRCC for a pre-removal risk assessment. When a person has already had a refugee protection claim assessed by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, only new evidence, such as evidence that demonstrates a change in country conditions, is considered. Persons whose applications are approved become ‘protected persons’ and may apply and be granted permanent resident status.


Newcomer Settlement and Integration

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Employment Equity Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, programming is developed based on policies that support the settlement, resettlement, adaptation and integration of newcomers into Canadian society. All permanent residents are eligible for settlement and integration programs. Programming is delivered by third parties (including provincial and municipal governments, school boards and post-secondary institutions, settlement service organizations and other non-governmental actors, and the private sector) across the country. However, accountability for expended funds and attaining outcomes remains with IRCC.

Foreign Credentials Referral

The Foreign Credentials Referral Office (FCRO) was established to help internationally trained individuals receive the information, path-finding and referral services to have their credentials assessed as quickly as possible so they can find work faster in the fields for which they have been trained. In Canada, Service Canada delivers in-person and telephone services on behalf of the FCRO. Information on foreign credential recognition (FCR) is also available through the FCRO website (www.credentials.gc.ca) to prospective immigrants overseas. The FCRO works with federal, provincial and territorial partners, and national associations, recognition bodies and employers to strengthen FCR processes across Canada. IRCC, through the FCRO, is the lead department on the pre-arrival component of the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications. The FCRO supports the Canadian Immigration Integration Program, a key service administered by the Association of Canadian Community Colleges that helps immigrants prepare for integration into the Canadian labour market while they are still in their countries of origin.

FCRO Public Inquiries Reporting System

Description: The FCRO Public Inquiries Reporting system is an MS-Access database that captures information related to clients’ questions and replies. The database contains details such as the correspondent’s name, e-mail address, country of residence, language used, category of inquiry, type of job in which the person wants to work and a summary of the inquiry.

Document Types: Summary of e-mails received from the clients.

Record Number: CIC AOB 007

Settlement

Settlement refers to a short period (three to five years) of mutual adaptation between the newcomers and the host society, during which the government provides support and services to newcomers, while integration is a two-way process that involves commitment on the part of immigrants to adapt to life in Canada and on the part of Canada to welcome and adapt to new peoples and cultures. Ultimately, the goal of integration is to encourage newcomers to be fully engaged in the economic, social, political and cultural life of Canada. IRCC’s Settlement Program assists immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers specific to the newcomer experience (such as a lack of official language skills and limited knowledge of Canada) so that they can participate in social, cultural, civic and economic life in Canada. The Program accomplishes this goal by providing language learning services for newcomers, community and employment bridging services, settlement information, and support services that facilitate access to settlement programming. Most services are designed and delivered by service provider organizations, but certain services (such as some information provision) are delivered directly by IRCC, and some services are delivered overseas. Currently, British Columbia and Quebec design, deliver, and administer their own settlement services. As a result of the 2012 Federal Budget, IRCC will resume the management of federally funded settlement services in British Columbia, beginning in 2014-2015.

Settlement Program Policy

Description: Policy, planning and correspondence on programs designed to help newcomers become fully participating, contributing Canadians.

Document Types: Development of policies, guidelines and programs for all provinces and territories where IRCC is responsible for the direct delivery of settlement programs.

Record Number: CIC ASB 020

Program Policy and Business Management

Description: Policy, operations and correspondence related to settlement funding and to the development of new directions for integration programs.

Document Types: Policy documents such as memorandum to cabinet, briefing notes, Treasury Board submissions related to policy development in the area of integration policy and programming.

Record Number: CIC ASB 022

Information and Orientation

The provision of settlement-related information and orientation is fundamental to the successful settlement of newcomers in Canada. Tools are provided for individuals to enable them to take charge of their own settlement and integration pathways and to effectively navigate Canadian systems (e.g. acquiring a social insurance number card, drivers’ license, or health card). Increasingly these tools and information are available prior to arrival to enable newcomers to plan more effectively. This Program area has two interrelated objectives. First, it aims to provide newcomers with relevant, accurate, consistent, and timely information that is needed to make informed settlement decisions and access settlement services. Second, it seeks to promote a contextual understanding of life in Canada, including laws, rights, responsibilities of citizenship, and the democratic system. This programming is delivered in part by IRCC itself and in partnership with a range of other government departments, other levels of government, and other partners including both national and international service provider organizations.

Language Training

The ability of newcomers to communicate in one of Canada’s official languages has long been recognized as key to both the initial settlement and the longer term integration of immigrants. Language learning services are intended to help newcomers develop sufficient linguistic communication skills (including literacy) to enable newcomers to function in Canadian society and contribute to the economy. Through the Settlement Program, IRCC funds service provider organizations to deliver various language learning services for newcomers, including language assessment and official language instruction.

Labour Market Access

The majority of newcomers who come to Canada intend to enter the labour force, and for most adults it is their primary objective upon arrival. Many face difficulties integrating into the Canadian labour market. These difficulties include individual and systemic barriers such as foreign credential recognition, lack of Canadian experience, lack of knowledge of workplace culture and discrimination. In addition, employers face barriers including knowing how to integrate newcomers into their labour force. Labour market services are intended to address these barriers and equip newcomers with the skills, information and support they need to enter into the labour market and contribute to the economy. Labour market participation also provides opportunities to practice language skills and to connect with other Canadians. Labour market services include services such as job search skills, soft skills, networking, internships, mentorships, and work placements. This programming is delivered by a range of partners including service provider organizations, labour market organizations like chambers of commerce, and employers themselves in some cases.

Welcoming Communities

While language, information and orientation, and labour market access programming are focused on newcomers, welcoming communities balances this focus by increasing the capacity of Canadian communities to value and facilitate the contribution of newcomers. The Community Connections stream of the Settlement Program works with public institutions (e.g. Schools, Libraries and Community Health Centres) to address newcomer needs, supports welcoming, safe and inclusive spaces where newcomers can access information, services and other public assets (e.g. Welcome Centres), enables local stakeholders to collaboratively develop plans, strategies and tools (e.g. Local Immigration Partnerships), communicates best practices and shares information and expertise, and connects vulnerable groups with their Canadian-born counterparts and established support networks (e.g. mentoring, connecting parents with young children to early childhood development networks, newcomer seniors to seniors networks, entrepreneurs to business networks, etc.). This programming is delivered through a range of partnerships including service provider organizations, public institutions such as libraries, school boards and community health centres, employers and other local partners.

Contribution to British Columbia for Settlement and Integration

Under a signed agreement between the government of Canada and the province of British Columbia, IRCC provides funding to the province for settlement and integration services that assist immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers specific to the newcomer experience. The province has primary responsibility for the design, administration and delivery of these settlement and integration services. British Columbia informs IRCC of its activities through an annual service plan and annual report. As a result of the 2012 Federal Budget, IRCC will resume the management of federally funded settlement services in British Columbia, beginning in 2014-2015.

Support for Official Language Minority Communities

IRCC has an obligation to take positive measures to foster the vitality of the official language minority communities under Part VII of the Official Languages Act. To that end, this program implements a cross section of promotion, recruitment and settlement activities to enhance the ability of these communities to welcome newcomers. The programming is delivered by a range of Partners including other orders of government, employers and service provider organizations.

Grant to Quebec

Quebec has the sole authority for administration of settlement and resettlement services for clients in that province. This program governs the transfer of funds under a federal-provincial agreement, the Canada-Quebec Accord. The monies are used by Quebec to develop, implement and manage delivery of settlement and resettlement services to newcomers. An objective of this Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec’s demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants to that province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec. Quebec has rights and responsibilities, set out in this Accord, with respect to the number of immigrants destined to Quebec and the selection, reception and integration of those immigrants.

Immigration Loan

The Immigration Loan Program is a statutory program under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. It ensures that some persons, otherwise unable to pay for the costs of transportation to Canada and medical admissibility exams, have access to a funding source. Assistance loans may also be approved for newcomers in need to cover initial settlement expenses such as rental and utilities deposits. The main target groups for the program are government-assisted refugees and privately sponsored refugees. These individuals have undergone extreme hardship and most often have few personal resources and are therefore unable to access traditional lending institutions. Canadian visa officers authorize the transportation and admissibility loans and the International Organization for Migration arranges travel and medical exams for refugees and pays these costs. IRCC reimburses them and the refugee reimburses IRCC. Assistance loans are authorized by in-Canada officers. The interest bearing loans are repayable in full and payment plans vary by the value of the loan and the recipients’ ability to repay while integrating.

Immigration Loans Program

Description: Immigration loans are designed to help foreign nationals to resettle to Canada as well as adjust to Canadian life and to gain access to the labour market.

Document Types: Immigration loans are provided to those persons accepted as permanent residents; general settlement assistance; transportation; assistance loan, clothing, medical examinations, right of permanent residence fee, emergency assistance.

Record Number: CIC ASB 011

Management Data Finance

Description: Computerized information systems of a financial, personnel, and operational performance measurement nature.

Document Types: Correspondence; status reports; minutes of meetings. Information held in Electronic Data Processing (EDP) systems is organized under the following title: Immigration Program Accounts Receivable which provides for the monitoring and tracking of loans granted to immigrants.

Record Number: CIC APB 001

Refugee Resettlement Assistance Program

The Refugee Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP) provides direct financial support and immediate and essential services to RAP clients, including Government-Assisted Refugees, Privately Sponsored Refugees in Blended Initiatives, and persons in refugee-like situations admitted to Canada under a Public Policy, to meet their resettlement needs. In most cases RAP clients have undergone extreme hardship and may lack the social networks and the financial resources to assist in addressing the needs associated with becoming established in a new country. Income support is administered directly by IRCC to RAP clients for up to 12 months if the RAP client’s income is insufficient to meet his or her own needs and the needs of any accompanying dependents. In some cases, RAP clients also receive start up allowances for expenses related to furniture and other household supplies. Immediate and essential services are supported through contributions to service provider organizations in all provinces in Canada except Quebec, which delivers similar settlement services through the Canada-Quebec Accord. RAP services include, but are not limited to, port of entry services, assistance with temporary accommodations, assistance opening a bank account, life skills training, orientation sessions, and links to settlement programming and mandatory federal and provincial programs.

Resettlement Program Policy

Description: Policy, planning and correspondence on resettlement programs designed to help newcomers become fully participating, contributing Canadians.

Document Types: Development of policies, guidelines and programs for all provinces and territories where IRCC is responsible for the direct delivery of settlement programs.

Record Number: CIC ASB 021


Citizenship for Newcomers and all Canadians

The purpose of the Citizenship Program is to administer citizenship legislation and promote the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship. IRCC administers the acquisition of Canadian citizenship by developing, implementing, and applying legislation, regulations and policies that protect the integrity of Canadian citizenship and allow eligible applicants to be granted citizenship or be provided with a proof of citizenship. In addition, the program promotes citizenship, to both newcomers and the Canadian-born, through various events, materials and projects. Promotional activities focus on enhancing knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions, and values, as well as fostering an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

Citizenship Awareness

The Citizenship Program aims to enhance the meaning of Canadian citizenship for both newcomers and the Canadian-born and to increase a sense of belonging to Canada. Through knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions and values, as well as the rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship, newcomers and the Canadian-born are better equipped for active citizenship and can contribute to the development of an integrated society. The program undertakes various knowledge-building and promotional activities such as: citizenship ceremonies; citizenship reaffirmation ceremonies; Citizenship Week; Canada’s Citizenship award; and, the distribution of citizenship educational publications (e.g. Discover Canada citizenship study guide).

Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation & Revocation

Citizenship processing activities include interpreting and administering the Citizenship Act and Regulations, managing the naturalization process (whereby non-citizens become citizens), issuing proof of citizenship to those who are citizens by birth or by naturalization, and maintaining these records. The processing of Canadian citizenship helps newcomers fully participate in Canadian life and contributes to their successful integration into Canadian society. A person’s citizenship is revoked if it is found that they have obtained their citizenship fraudulently, by misrepresentation or by knowingly concealing information during the course of their immigration or citizenship application process. IRCC reviews files where there are allegations of fraud and collects and analyses information to determine if recommendation to initiate revocation proceedings should be made to the Minister.

Citizenship Policy

Description: Information concerning the administration of past and present citizenship legislation and policy, development of new citizenship legislation and policies.

Document Types: Legislative, regulatory and program policies relating to citizenship legislation; citizenship by naturalization; acquisition of Canadian citizenship; certificates of citizenship; residence requirements; tools used for the assessment of citizenship knowledge requirements (test and study guide) and language requirements (assessment and screening tools); prohibitions; violation and penalty for offence against acts or regulations; hearings; oaths or affirmations; loss of citizenship; renunciation of citizenship; revocation of citizenship; resumption of citizenship; statelessness; dual nationality; Citizenship Act; Citizenship Regulations; authority of Governor in Council; and previous citizenship legislation.

Record Number: CIC ASB 004


Migration Health Management

This program aims to provide effective migration health services to manage the health aspect of migrant access and settlement to Canada, and facilitate the arrival of resettled refugees to Canada and their integration while contributing to the protection of the health and safety of all Canadians and contributing to the maintenance of sustainable Canadian health and social services.

The program aims to evaluate health risks related to immigration and coordinate with international and Canadian health partners to develop risk management strategies and processes to assess the health of applicants wishing to immigrate to Canada and develop pre-departure, in-transit, and post arrival interventions. The strategies, processes and interventions are intended to reduce the impact of the risks identified on the health of Canadians and on Canada’s health and social services.

Health Screening

This Program aims to manage the health risks related to permanent and temporary residence according to the three grounds for inadmissibility under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, which are (1) danger to public health, (2) danger to public safety and (3) excessive demand on health or social services.

The Immigration Medical Examination (IME) is a tool used to screen for infectious diseases all applicants for permanent and temporary residence. The IME includes x-rays and lab tests that identify applicants who could pose health threats to Canadians or to the Canadian health and social systems. Those who are in good health are cleared for entry into Canada; those who are found with infectious disease are referred for treatment before admittance to Canada; those who are a danger to public health or public safety or are deemed to cause excessive demand on Canada’s health and social system are deemed inadmissible.

Immigration Medical Examination Program (IMEP)

IMEP is responsible for selecting, appointing, monitoring, evaluating and, when required, suspending or terminating panel members (physician, radiologist, laboratory) who conduct Canadian immigration medical examinations. It is responsible for preparing the training and reference materials used by panel members performing Canadian IMEs, as well as the policy framework that governs the IME process. IRCC-Health Branch (IRCC-HB) supports the functions of panel members performing IMEs through advice, guidance, liaison visits and instruction.

Document Types: Files describing the panel members practice and the audits performed by IRCC on the DMP/Examiner

Record Number: CIC AOB 006

Immigration Medical Assessment Program (IMAP)

IMAP assesses immigration medical examinations to determine if potential permanent and temporary residents to Canada are not inadmissible on health grounds.

Document Types: Medical examination and assessment of those permanent and temporary residents who have submitted to an immigration medical examination; and related immigration health policy and guidelines.

Record Number: CIC AOB 003

Medical Surveillance Notification

Section 38(1) of Immigration and Refugee Protection Act sets danger to public to health as a condition of inadmissibility to Canada.

Applicants for temporary or permanent residence in Canada whose Immigration Medical Assessments demonstrate that they may pose risks to public health require further health assessment and monitoring following their landing in Canada in order to ensure that they do not represent a danger to public health.

The Medical Surveillance Notification Program informs provincial/territorial public health authorities of applicants who require medical surveillance in order to ensure that the terms and conditions of landing are met.

Interim Federal Health Program

The Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP) is a discretionary program that provides limited, temporary coverage of health care costs for specific groups of people including protected persons, refugee claimants, rejected refugee claimants, and certain persons detained under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. The Program helps protect public health and public safety, and offers access to urgent and essential health services and products to some of the eligible groups above. The Program primarily offers four types of coverage: health care coverage, public health or public safety health care coverage, Immigration Medical Examinations, and coverage for detainees.

In general, eligibility for the IFHP is restricted to those who are not eligible for provincial or territorial health insurance. The IFHP does not cover services or products for which a person may make a claim under a private insurance plan.

The IFHP provides coverage to eligible beneficiaries, via a contracted claims administrator, through a network of registered health-care providers across Canada. Health-care providers are reimbursed directly for covered services rendered to eligible beneficiaries.


Migration Control and Security Management

This Program aims to ensure the managed migration of foreign nationals and newcomers to Canada. As such, in accordance with the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and accompanying Regulations, IRCC facilitates the travel of bona fide permanent residents, visitors, students and temporary workers while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians by effectively managing migration access and controlling entry. This is accomplished through a variety of policy and operational measures, including visa policy interventions, anti-fraud measures, eligibility and admissibility criteria, negotiations of bilateral and multilateral information sharing agreements and treaties, security updates to travel and immigration status documents, as well as revisions to identity management practices. Strategic partnership engagements with security and public safety-related departments are another essential component of this Program.

Permanent Resident Status Documents

In accordance with the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, IRCC must process and issue to all permanent residents a secure status document for travel purposes. The Permanent Resident Card (PR Card) serves as proof of permanent resident status in Canada and may be easily verified by commercial carriers and border officers. While the PR Card also meets international travel document standards it is not a travel document. The PR Status Documents Program makes it difficult to access Canadian territory fraudulently. The Program establishes a mechanism to verify compliance with the residency requirement, provides permanent residents with a status document confirming their right to live, work and study in Canada, provides permanent residents with access to government services and enables them to be recognized and processed quickly at the border, thereby enhancing border security. While not mandatory within Canada, the PR Card is required for all permanent residents as proof of their status when seeking to re-enter Canada on a commercial carrier. It contains security features to reduce the risk of fraud. Permanent residents who obtained their status under previous immigration legislation or those who wish to replace an expired, lost or stolen PR Card may obtain one upon application. Limited use travel documents are also issued by visa offices overseas to qualified Permanent Residents outside of Canada who do not have a valid PR Card, to facilitate return travel to Canada.

Immigration Statistics

Description: Annual, quarterly and monthly reports on the number of persons who become permanent residents, by class, or who are in the process of becoming permanent residents.

Document Types: By immigrant class, statistics on applications received, persons in process, visas issued, number of persons landed as permanent residents, source countries and province of destination. Note: These records may be shared with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

Record Number: CIC ASB 016

Card Control System (CCS)

Description: The CCS brings together data and images from the Field Operations Support System (FOSS), the Case Processing Centre System (CPC) and a scanning database held in Sydney, Nova Scotia. When all the data are complete and present, CCS sends these to the Permanent Resident Card Production Facility in Canadian Bank Note (CBN) in order to produce the Permanent Resident (PR) Card. CBN then returns card data, the disposition of the card and various statistics used in the management of the program. There are interfaces to the FOSS, the CPC system, the Sydney Scanning System, the Client Status Query (CSQ) and CBN.

Document Types: Case processing information, reports.

Record Number: CIC APB 017

Visitors Status

Under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, all visitors to Canada require a Temporary Resident Visa (TRV), except citizens of countries for which an exemption has been granted under the Regulations. A foreign national who wishes to come to Canada, and from a country for which a TRV is imposed, needs to apply at a Canadian Embassy abroad prior to traveling to Canada. The Visitors Status Program aims to ensure that each applicant is screened to determine whether they meet the entry requirements, including that they will abide by the terms and conditions of entry, and are not inadmissible to Canada. The screening of travellers requiring a TRV is carried out by IRCC in cooperation with its federal security partners. Once individuals arrive in Canada, their status needs to be maintained, regardless of whether they needed a visa to enter the country.

The TRV is designed to prevent individuals who would abuse temporary entry from coming to Canada, and to facilitate the entry to Canada of genuine temporary residents. The requirement to obtain a TRV limits the number of immigration violations (i.e., refugee claims, no proper travel documents, not leaving Canada once the period of stay has expired, working illegally, etc.) and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians.

Temporary Resident Permits

Persons seeking temporary residence in Canada who do not meet the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act requirements are subject to refusal of Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) abroad, denial of entry at ports of entry, or refusal of extensions inland. In some cases, however, there may be compelling reasons for an officer to issue a Temporary Resident Permit (TRP) to allow a person who is otherwise inadmissible to enter or remain in Canada. Designated officers may issue these permits abroad, at a port of entry or in Canada, depending on the circumstances. Grounds for issuance of a TRP include, among others, inadmissibility due to medical reasons, criminality, reasons of security, infringement of human or international rights, or organized crime. TRPs are issued for a limited, often short, period of time and subject to cancellation at any time. TRPs provide officers with the flexibility to address exceptional circumstances and, in so doing, maintain the integrity of Canada’s immigration program and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians.

Fraud Prevention and Program Integrity Protection

Under this Program, policy is developed and procedures are designed in order to maintain confidence in Canada’s citizenship and immigration system and to protect the safety and security of Canada while effectively delivering on economic and social objectives by selecting only those applicants that meet program needs. Program integrity is achieved through case processing procedures that filter out applicants who fail to meet eligibility requirements, admissibility requirements or who commit fraud, and through referral of these cases for enforcement action where appropriate.

Identity management contributes to strengthened program integrity by ensuring that services are delivered to the correct individual; developing efficiencies across the multiple business lines; and allowing IRCC to streamline interactions with repeat clientele. Identity management involves the application of procedures to establish, fix, and manage client identity across IRCC operations and between key partners based on personal identifiers, identity documents, and biometrics identifiers.

Case Processing System (CPS)

Description: The Case Processing System (CPS) is both a tracking system and a processing system accessible only to employees of the Danger to the Public - Humanitarian and Compassionate Unit, Case Review Division, Case Management Branch. All humanitarian and compassionate consideration cases and requests for consultation with the Minister on refugees and refugee claimants who are subject to extradition proceedings, direction for hearings on long-term permanent residents convicted of serious crimes, pre-removal risk assessments (PRRA) as well as all danger to the public cases are in this system. Reports are prepared for the Minister’s delegate in each case using CPS. All information may be found on the Immigration case paper file.

Document Types: Case processing information, reports.

Record Number: CIC APB 018

Biometrics Field Trial

Description: The Biometrics Field Trial consisted of research on biometrics technology, policy and programs in Canada and around the world. The project participates in a number of domestic and international fora to develop understanding of trends, standards and new technologies. Note: All personal information collected for the purpose of this trial was destroyed three months after the closing of the field trial (July 2007).

Document Types: Letters, briefing notes, ministerial correspondence, policies, directives, manuals, forms, operational memoranda, Privacy Impact Assessment, policy concerning testing biometrics within IRCC and CBSA operations, analysis and testing of Biometrics samples, Field Trial Evaluation Report, Field Trial Close Out Report.

Record Number: CIC ASB 024


Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

Reflecting part of IRCC’s mandate, this Program aims to influence the international migration and integration policy agenda. This is done by developing and promoting, together with other public policy sectors, Canada’s position on international migration, integration, and refugee protection issues and through participation in multilateral, regional and bilateral forums.

IRCC works closely with partner countries to ensure the effective administration of immigration laws through the exchange of information, including biometric data. This international migration policy development helps Canada advance its interests in the context of international migration as well as meet its international obligations and commitments.

IRCC supports international engagement and partnerships through membership in the International Organization for Migration, and contribution arrangements with other international migration policy organizations.

International Migration/International Policy Coordination

Description: Policy documents, briefing notes, correspondence, presentations, reports and information on departmental and government-wide participation in bilateral and multilateral international engagement relating to international migration, involving foreign governments, international organizations and fora. Contribution and grant agreements and supporting documents relating to Canada’s membership in and support for international migration organizations.

Document Types: International co-operation and liaison, general information and reports related to international organizations and conferences.

Record Number: CIC ACB 015


Internal Services

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: management and oversight services; communications services; legal services; human resources management services; financial management services; information management services; information technology services; real property services; materiel services; acquisition services; and travel and other administrative services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Acquisitions

Acquisition Services involve activities undertaken to acquire a good and/or service to fufill a properly completed request (including a complete an accurate definition of requirement and certification that funds are available until entering into or amending a contract.

Communications Services

Communications services involve activities undertaken to ensure that Government of Canada communications are effectively managed, well coordinated and responsive to the diverse information needs of the public. The communications management function ensures that the public – internal or external – receives government information, and that the views and concerns of the public are taken into account in the planning, management and evaluation of policies, programs, services and initiatives.

Financial Management

Financial management services involve activities undertaken to ensure the prudent use of public resources, including planning, budgeting, accounting, reporting, control and oversight, analysis, decision support and advice, and financial systems.

Human Resources Management

Human resources management services involve activities undertaken for determining strategic direction, allocating resources among services and processes, as well as activities relating to analyzing exposure to risk and determining appropriate countermeasures. They ensure that the service operations and programs of the federal government comply with applicable laws, regulations, policies, and/or plans.

Information Management

Information management services involve activities undertaken to achieve efficient and effective information management to support program and service delivery; foster informed decision making; facilitate accountability, transparency, and collaboration; and preserve and ensure access to information and records for the benefit of present and future generations.

Information Technology

Information technology services involve activities undertaken to achieve efficient and effective use of information technology to support government priorities and program delivery, to increase productivity, and to enhance services to the public.

Legal Services

Legal services involve activities undertaken to enable government departments and agencies to pursue policy, program and service delivery priorities and objectives within a legally sound framework.

Management and Oversight Services

Management and oversight services involve activities undertaken for determining strategic direction, and allocating resources among services and processes, as well as those activities related to analyzing exposure to risk and determining appropriate countermeasures. They ensure that the service operations and programs of the federal government comply with applicable laws, regulations, policies, and/or plans.

Materiel Services

Materiel services involve activities undertaken to ensure that materiel can be managed by departments in a sustainable and financially responsible manner that supports the cost-effective and efficient delivery of government programs.

Real Property Services

Real property services involve activities undertaken to ensure real property is managed in a sustainable and financially responsible manner, throughout its life cycle, to support the cost-effective and efficient delivery of government programs.

Travel and Other Administrative Services

Travel and other administrative services include Government of Canada (GC) travel services, as well as those other internal services that do not smoothly fit with any of the internal services categories.


Classes of Personal Information

Application for an ex gratia payment

Head Tax payers and the conjugal partners of deceased Head Tax Payers, or those applying on their behalf, provided personal information about the applicant to the Department of Canadian Heritage to allow determination of eligibility for a payment, with consent. Canadian Heritage shared personal information with IRCC for purposes of confirming the applicant’s residency record and citizenship status and identity, and the existence of a conjugal relationship, also with consent. IRCC shared Information on the applicant’s residency/citizenship record with Canadian Heritage, with consent, for purposes of making a decision on eligibility for an ex gratia payment. Canadian Heritage also disclosed applicants’ personal information to HRSDC for purposes of confirming identity and conjugal relationships to establish eligibility for payment, with consent, and HRSDC disclosed information on identity or conjugal relationships, if any, to Canadian Heritage, with consent.

Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act

Federal institutions provide information to the department on how they implement the Canadian Multiculturalism Act. This input is compiled into an annual report which is tabled in Parliament within 5 sitting days of a new calendar year.

Under Section 8 of the Act, the Minister responsible for multiculturalism is required to prepare and table in Parliament an annual report on the operation of the Act. Section 3 of the Act requires federal institutions (departments, agencies and Crown Corporations) to carry out their activities in a way that responds to the multicultural reality of Canada, and to report on those activities through the Annual Report.

Multiculturalism Champions Network

The Multiculturalism Champions Network was created in 2005 and consists of members of federal institutions who play a leadership role in their organizations, ensuring that policies, programs, and practices are responsive to diversity and building awareness. There are currently Multiculturalism Champions in 95 federal institutions.

The Network facilitates the incorporation of a multiculturalism lens across the federal government and supports the implementation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act.

Federal-Provincial-Territorial Network of Officials Responsible for Multiculturalism Issues (FPTORMI)

The Multiculturalism FPT network was established in 2005 and is co-chaired by a federal and an alternating provincial representative. The Multiculturalism FPT network provides an ongoing forum for FPT representatives to exchange information and engage in policy dialogue regarding programs, research and other issues concerning multiculturalism, diversity and anti-racism with the overarching objective of promoting inclusion and integration in Canada.

Manuals


Additional Information

Please see the Introduction to this publication for information on access procedures under the provisions of the Access to information Act and the Privacy Act. In effort to save time and postage, and in order to modernize our client service delivery, Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) requests can now be submitted online at https://atip-aiprp.apps.gc.ca/atip/. This includes requests for personal information held in 2001 or before and/or that involves an investigation file, as well as requests for any of Passport Canada’s corporate records.

IRCC ATIP requests can also be submitted in writing at the following address:

Access to Information and Privacy Division
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Narono Building
360 Laurier Avenue West, 10th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 1L1

Find answers to your questions about IRCC programs and activities in the Help Centre.

Be aware that any requests for personal information held by Passport Canada in 2002 or after, or for records regarding the delivery of passport services should be made to Employment and Social Development Canada.


Footnote

Footnote 1

The relationship with Quebec is governed under the Canada-Quebec Accord.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Features

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