2012 Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism Recipient

2012 Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism Recipient

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Transcript for “2012 Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism Recipient”

Pictures of Senator Paul Yuzyk flash on screen.

Announcer: Every year, the Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism is awarded to those who have made exceptional contributions to multiculturalism and integration in Canada.

Video shows series of pictures of Bridget Foster.

Announcer: This year’s award recipient Bridget Foster of St. John’s Newfoundland and Labrador immigrated to Canada in 1978 from Great Britain. As an immigrant herself, Bridget experienced first-hand the settlement and integration process. It was these experiences that led her to the Association for New Canadians where she has worked for over thirty years.

Video changes to close-up of a woman, Bridget Foster, sitting in her office.

A banner flashes on the screen that says: Bridget Foster, 2012 Award Recipient for Lifetime Achievement.

Bridget Foster: I found an organization that the work really interested me. It was a very small organization in those days. But I could see that, you know, the opportunities that it presented. To perhaps help other people feel more comfortable when they arrive than I had perhaps felt, although I didn’t have language barriers and so on, it really, I suppose, presented a bit of a challenge.

Video changes to show Bridget Foster working with newcomers in the classroom.

Bridget Foster: I started with the organization as a volunteer and I wasn’t very good at that because I didn’t like being told what to do.

Video changes back to close-up of Bridget Foster, sitting in her office

Bridget Foster: So, I became the executive director, and you know I really fell it’s true what they say, it’s not the place, and it’s the job and what comes with that. Making the connections, feeling you are making a contribution. This truly is an amazing province and I just wanted other people to see what I see.

Video changes to show Bridget Foster working with children in the classroom.

Bridget Foster: The skills and the talents that people bring…

Video changes back to close-up of Bridget Foster, sitting in her office

Bridget Foster: you only have to walk into this school where we are today and it really re-enforces just what a contribution people make when they come here. They want to be part of it, they want to fit in, and they want to learn about Canada.

Video changes to another close-up of a woman, Lorraine Angelopoulos, standing and talking about the award recipient.

A banner flashes on screen that says: Lorraine Angelopoulos, Former instructor, Association for New Canadians Language School

Lorraine Angelopoulos: She’s been one of the builders, I think, of Canadian society and the values that we hold dear. You know, that immigrants are a positive and that they contribute,

Video changes to show photograph of Bridget Foster talking with Minister Kenney in the halls of the Association for New Canadians.

Lorraine Angelopoulos: and she has always had that vision. Really the influx of immigrants in the past 25 years

Video changes back to Lorraine Angelopoulos, standing and talking about the award recipient.

Lorraine Angelopoulos: is not solely due to her of course, but you know she has certainly eased the way for many many immigrants.

Video changes to close-up of a man, Remzi Cej, standing and talking about the award recipient.

A banner flashes on screen that says: Remzi Cej, Chair, Newfoundland and Labrador Human Rights Commission,

Remzi Cej: I have always felt that you only feel at home in a place where you are comfortable being the person that you are. Having that identity not tampered with or changed with in anyway. Multiculturalism fosters that and supports it, and I think Bridget’s strength is in pushing that as much as she could, in helping us maintain our identity as the people we have come here, but also embracing the local culture as much as we could.

Announcer: Bridget’s involvement in the settlement sector has garnered her respect of local, regional and national politicians, civil servants, policy makers as well as academics. Most recently she was presented with the 2012 Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.

Video shows a variety of photographs of Bridget Foster receiving a variety of awards of recognition.

Announcer: Her commitment to immigrants and her strong advocacy on their behalf has been instrumental in enabling newcomers to Canada to become fully engaged Canadian citizens. She has influenced the lives of thousands of immigrants and refugees, not only in Newfoundland and Labrador, but across the country.

Video again shows Bridget Foster, sitting in her office.

Bridget Foster: We create a very comfortable environment. I mean that it what Multiculturalism is about, making people comfortable with people from other places and not seeing them as different. You know one of the things I like to do periodically is go into our daycare because the children in there are from all over the place and there is no difference. Everybody gets on and that’s what we have to work at.

Citizenship and Immigration logo appears.

The Canada word mark appears.

The video fades to black.

 
 
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