Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) tool - Skilled immigrants (Express Entry)

Legal Disclaimer: This tool is intended solely for general guidance and reference purposes. In the event of any discrepancy between the results of this questionnaire and that provided by the Express Entry electronic system, the results provided by the system shall govern, in accordance with provisions of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations, and Minister's Instructions issued under IRPA s.10.3. This tool will be updated from time to time in accordance with changes to the Ministerial Instructions governing Express Entry.

Use this tool if:

  • you have not filled out an Express Entry profile and you would like to see what your Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS)  score might be if you do, OR
  • you were invited to apply for permanent residence, and want to see if a change to your profile may affect your CRS score.

If you were invited to apply, you need to make sure that your CRS score is above the minimum points score of your round of invitation . This tool will help you recalculate your score based on the answers you provide below.

The CRS is a points-based system that is used to assess and score a candidate’s profile to rank them in the Express Entry pool. It is used to assess skills, work experience, language ability, education and other factors.

  • If you’ve been invited to apply, enter your age on the date you were invited.
    OR
  • If you plan to complete an Express Entry profile, enter your current age.
  • earned a Canadian degree, diploma or certificate; or
  • had an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) if you did your study outside Canada. (ECAs must be from an approved agency, in the last five years)

Note: a Canadian degree, diploma or certificate must either have been earned at an accredited Canadian university, college, trade or technical school, or other institute in Canada. Distance learning counts, but only if it made up less than half your study.

Note: to answer yes:

  • English or French as a Second Language must not have made up more than half your study
  • you must not have studied under an award that required you to return to your home country after graduation to apply your skills and knowledge
  • you must have studied at a school within Canada (foreign campuses don’t count)
  • you had to be enrolled full time for at least eight months, and have been physically present in Canada for at least eight months.

5) Official languages: Canada's official languages are English and French.

You need to submit language test results for all programs under Express Entry, even if English or French is your first language.

Enter your test scores:

If so, which language test did you take for your second official language?

Test results must be less than two years old.

Enter your test scores for:

6) Work Experience

It must have been paid and full-time (or an equal amount in part-time).

Note: In Canada, the National Occupational Classification (NOC) is the official list of all the jobs in the Canadian labour market. It describes each job according to skill type, group and level.

"Skilled work" in the NOC is:

  • managerial jobs (NOC Skill Level 0),
  • professional jobs (NOC Skill Type A), or
  • technical jobs and skilled trades/manual work (NOC Skill Type B).

If you are not sure of the NOC level for this job, you can find your NOC on this site.

It must have been paid, full-time (or an equal amount in part-time), and in only one occupation (NOC skill type 0, A or B).

Note: A certificate of qualification lets people work in some skilled trades in Canada. Only the provinces and territories can issue these certificates. To get one, a person must have them assess their training, trade experience and skills to and then pass a certification exam.

People usually have to go to the province or territory to be assessed. They may also need experience and training from an employer in Canada.

This is not the same as a nomination from a province or territory.

A valid job offer must be

  • full-time
  • in a skilled job listed as Skill Type 0, or Skill Level A or B in the 2011 National Occupational Classification
  • supported by a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) or exempt from needing one
  • for one year from the time you become a permanent resident.

A job offer is not valid if your employer is:

  • an embassy, high commission or consulate in Canada or
  • on the list of ineligible employers.

Whether an offer is valid or not also depends on different factors, depending on your case. See a full list of criteria for valid job offers.

You can use our online tool to find out if you don’t know.

  • earned a Canadian degree, diploma or certificate; or
  • had an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA)? (ECAs must be from an approved agency, in the last five years)

To get the correct number of points, make sure you choose the answer that best reflects your case. For example:

If you have TWO Bachelor’s degrees, or one Bachelor’s AND a two year college diploma, choose – “Two or more certificates, diplomas, or degrees. One must be for a program of three or more years.”

It must have been paid, full-time (or an equal amount in part-time), and in one or more NOC 0, A or B jobs.

Test results must be less than two years old.

Enter the test scores for:

Your results

All Express Entry candidates get a score out of 1,200, based on the four parts of the Comprehensive Ranking System formula.

We invite the highest-ranking candidates from the pool to apply as a permanent resident through regular “rounds of invitations.” See what minimum scores have been in the past.

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