Guide 5781 – Applying to Voluntarily Renounce Your Permanent Resident Status


Table of Contents


Overview

Application package

This application package consists of:

  • an instruction guide, and
  • the required forms.

The instruction guide is a tool that provides:

  • the information you must know about this application before sending it to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and
  • assistance with how to fill out the forms and the required supporting documents.

Read the instruction guide thoroughly and then fill out each of the applicable forms.

The forms are specifically designed with questions that will assist the processing of your application.


Symbols used in this guide

This guide uses the following symbols to indicate information of particular importance.

Required step

What you must do to have your application processed.

Important information

Important information that you need to be aware of in order to avoid delays or other problems.

Get more information

Where to get more information.

Note:

Tips that will assist you with this application.



Before You Apply


Who may use this application?

This application is for persons who want to voluntarily renounce their status as permanent resident of Canada.


Who is eligible to renounce their permanent resident status?

To renounce your status as a permanent resident, you must:

  • be a permanent resident of Canada;
  • have citizenship or valid legal permanent resident status in another country.

Note: In case where the client is under 18 years of age, all legal guardians must consent in writing to the client renouncing their permanent resident status.


Why would I renounce my permanent resident status?

There are multiple situations in which a person might wish to renounce permanent resident status including:

  • You want to accept a diplomatic or official position with a foreign government;
  • You want to obtain citizenship or permanent resident status in another country and that country requires you to renounce permanent resident status in Canada;
  • You only want to visit Canada and you know you have not met the residency obligations because you have been outside of Canada for a long period of time and
    • you don’t want to wait for a visa officer to assess whether or not you are still a permanent resident of Canada; or
    • You would like to avoid delays at the Port of Entry.
  • You no longer want to live in Canada permanently.

Note: You do not need to renounce your permanent resident status in order to become a Canadian Citizen.


What happens if I renounce my permanent resident status?

If you renounce your permanent resident status, you will permanently change your status in Canada as of the day your application is approved by an officer. You will be unable to appeal the decision to the Immigration Appeal Division (IAD). You will no longer be a permanent resident of Canada. You will no longer be eligible to apply for Canadian citizenship. Any application for Canadian citizenship that is still in process will be refused.


How will renouncing my permanent resident status affect my family?

Your family members do not need to renounce their permanent resident status if you do. They can remain as permanent residents.

However, when CIC receives your application to renounce your permanent resident status, it will suspend any active family class sponsorship applications you may have already submitted. If your application to renounce your permanent resident status is approved, any sponsorship application that is still in process will be refused. The applications for permanent residence of any family you have sponsored that are still in process will also be refused. The processing fees will not be refunded.


Can I still get social services or federal benefits if I’m not a permanent resident?

If you renounce your permanent residence in Canada, you will lose access to social and health services provided to permanent residents by the Government of Canada or your province or territory of residence. You may still qualify for certain benefits such as those related to the Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security, but there may be exceptions.

If you receive or plan to receive social services or benefits from the Government of Canada or from a province or territory, you should contact the appropriate authorities within the federal government or the province or territory. They can tell you if you have to be a permanent resident to receive the service.


Can I stay in or return to Canada after renouncing my permanent resident status?

If you live in Canada, you will automatically become a temporary resident after renouncing your permanent resident status. You do not need to make a separate application for temporary residence. Your temporary resident status will be valid for six months. To remain in Canada longer, you will have to apply to extend your stay as a visitor before it expires. You will no longer be allowed to work or study without authorization from Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC).

If you do not live in Canada, you will no longer have the right to travel to or stay in Canada, unless you meet all regular requirements to obtain temporary resident status. You may need to apply for a temporary resident visa (TRV) if you would like to return to Canada, depending on your country of citizenship and the purpose of your visit. If you wish to apply for a temporary resident visa, you must submit your visa application separately from your application to renounce your permanent resident status.

TRV applications must be submitted following the existing instructions for submitting TRV applications, while Voluntary Renunciation of PR status applications must be sent in a separate envelope by mail to the CIC visa office.

We recommend that you apply for Voluntary Renunciation of your PR status first, and apply for your TRV once you receive the approval of your Voluntary Renunciation.

Once you have renounced your permanent resident status, there is no guarantee that you will be allowed to enter Canada as a temporary resident.

If you do not meet the requirements of temporary residence, you could be prevented from entering Canada or if you are in Canada, you could be removed from Canada.


Can I still renounce my permanent resident status if I’m a protected person?

Yes you can, but you will not lose your protected person status. If you remain in Canada, you can continue to live as a protected person in Canada and you may be eligible for a work or study permit.

If you leave Canada or are already outside of Canada, your protected person status is not a guarantee of re-entry into Canada. You may have to obtain a temporary resident visa (TRV), a work permit, or a study permit, depending on your country of citizenship and the purpose of your visit.


Step 1. Gather Documents

What documents are required?

Use the Document Checklist (IMM 5783) to assist you in gathering the necessary documents.


Important information

Note: If any of the required documents are missing, or photocopies are not clear and legible, your application will be returned to you.


What do I provide if I changed my name?

Consult the following examples to determine which documents to include with your application:

If you have legally changed your name,

  • Submit a copy of the change of name document issued by a Canadian province or territory, or by the appropriate foreign-state authority.

If you have changed your name as a result of marriage, adoption or divorce

  • Submit a copy of:
    • the document showing both names and
    • a copy of one document issued by a Canadian province or territory or by an appropriate foreign-state authority.

Examples of documents to include:

  • health insurance card,
  • driver’s licence or
  • an official school record issued by the provincial or territorial department responsible for education showing that exact name.

If you have applied for an amendment to your Record of Landing or Confirmation of Permanent Residence,

  • Submit a copy of the amendment or a letter confirming the change of name.

Applicants under the age of 18

A clear and legible photocopy of one of the following:

  • applicant’s birth certificate showing the applicant’s name, date of birth, place of birth and the names of the parents or adoptive parents.

NOTE: if the names of both parents do not appear on the birth certificate, include also a baptismal certificate, a civil registry document, a school transcript or a national identity card which carries the name of the child and both parents.

  • If the child is adopted or under legal guardianship, a copy of the adoption order or legal guardianship documents.
  • If the child is under the sole custody of one parent, sole custody should be proven by providing:
    • The birth certificate which indicates the father is unknown;
    • A death certificate of one parent; or
    • A court order or a written agreement granting sole custody
  • If one parent has custody under a court order or a written agreement which gives the non-custodial parent the right to be consulted on decisions related to the child, the signatures of both parents are required.

Step 2. Complete the Application

Filling out the application

Make one photocopy of the original forms once you have filled them out.

Original forms:

Sign the original forms.

NOTE: If the application is for a client under the age of 18, signatures of client and ALL parents or guardians are required.

See Step 4 below for information on where to send your application.

Photocopy:

Keep this set for your personal records.

Follow the step-by-step instructions below to complete the application forms.


The following are the forms that must be filled out and submitted for all clients:



Important information

Be complete and accurate

Complete all sections. If a section does not apply to you, write “Not Applicable” or “NA”. If your application is incomplete it may be returned to you and this will delay the processing of your application.

If you need more space for any section, print out an additional page containing the appropriate section, complete it and submit it along with your application.


Application to Voluntarily Renounce Permanent Resident Status (IMM 5782)

Part A - Personal Information

Question 1

Write your full family name (surname/family name) as it appears on your Record of Landing (IMM 1000) or Confirmation of Permanent Residence (IMM 5292 or IMM 5688) or Permanent Resident Card).

Write all of your given names (first, second or more) as it appears on your Record of Landing (IMM 1000) or Confirmation of Permanent Residence (IMM 5292 or IMM 5688) or Permanent Resident Card).

Write all of your other names (first, second or more) for example, maiden name, son/daughter of, other family name, other given name.

Question 2

Select your sex as female or male.

Question 3

Write your complete date of birth.

Question 4

Indicate your place of birth, including the city or town.

Question 5

Select your current marital status:

Single: This means that you have never been married and are not in a common-law relationship.

Married: This means that you and your spouse have had a ceremony that legally binds you to each other. Your marriage must be legally recognized in the country where it was performed and in Canada.

Widowed: This means that your spouse has died and that you have not re-married or entered into a common-law relationship.

Divorced: This means that you are officially separated and have legally ended your marriage.

Legally Separated: This means that you are married, but no longer living with your spouse.

Common-Law: This means that you have lived continuously with your partner in a marital-type relationship for a minimum of one (1) year.

Question 6

Write the date and place (including city and province) of where you became a Permanent resident. (As it appears on your Record of Landing (IMM 1000) or Confirmation of Permanent Residence (IMM 5292 or IMM 5688).

Question 7

Write the document number on your Record of Landing (IMM 1000) or Confirmation of Permanent Residence (IMM 5292 or IMM 5688).

Question 8

Write your passport or travel document number. Make sure there is no space between each number or letter.

Write the date your passport was issued and the expiry date.

Question 9

a) Check the appropriate box if you are a citizen of a country.
If yes, indicate of which country (ies).

b) Check the appropriate box to indicate if you are a permanent resident of another country.
If yes, indicate of which country (ies).

c) Write in which country (ies) you can legally return to.

Question 10

a) Indicate your current residential address include the following information:

  • Apartment (Apt.) or Unit, if applicable
  • Street Number (No.). It is the number on your house or apartment building.
  • Street Name
  • City or Town
  • Country
  • Province or State
  • Postal Code/zip code
  • District, if applicable
  • Telephone number including, country code, area code and number
  • If applicable, indicate your e-mail address using a format to the following: name@provider.net

b) Indicate your current mailing address, if different from above by typing the following information:

  • Post Office Box (P.O. Box) number, if applicable. If you do not indicate post office box, the Street number must be provided
  • Apartment (Apt.) or Unit, if applicable
  • Street number (No.), if applicable. It is the number on your house or apartment building. This must be provided if you did not type in a P.O. Box
  • Street name, if applicable
  • City or Town
  • Write the Country of your current mailing address
  • Province or State
  • Postal code/zip code
  • District, if applicable

Note: All correspondence will go to this address.

c) Indicate the address in Canada you intend to visit, include the following information:

  • Apartment (Apt.) or Unit, if applicable
  • Street number (No.), if applicable. It is the number on your house or apartment building. This must be provided if you did not type in a P.O. Box
  • Street name, if applicable
  • City or Town
  • Write the Country
  • Province
  • Postal code

Use of a Representative (IMM 5476)

Who may use this form?

Complete this form only if you:

  • are appointing a representative;
  • have to update contact information for your previously appointed representative; or
  • are cancelling a representative’s appointment.

If you have dependent children aged 18 years or older, they are required to complete their own copy of this form if a representative is also conducting business on their behalf.

Who is a representative?

A representative is someone who provides advice, consultation, or guidance to you at any stage of the application process, or in a proceeding and, if you appoint him or her as your representative by filling out this form, has your permission to conduct business on your behalf with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA).

You are not obliged to hire a representative. We treat everyone equally, whether they use the service of a representative or not.

When you appoint a representative:

  • you also authorize IRCC and CBSA to share information from your case file with this person in place of you. Please note the representative will receive all correspondence from IRCC or the CBSA, not the applicant;
  • your application will not be given special attention nor can you expect faster processing or a more favourable outcome;
  • the representative is authorized to represent you only on citizenship or immigration matters related to the application you submit with this form; and
  • you can appoint only one (1) representative for each application you submit.

Important information: You must notify IRCC if your representative’s contact information changes, or if you change your representative, or cancel the appointment of your representative. For more information on updating IRCC with your representative’s information, please see below section - Notify IRCC about any changes.

There are two (2) types of representatives.

Uncompensated Representatives:

Uncompensated representatives do not charge fees or receive any other form of consideration or compensation for providing advice or services to represent you before IRCC or the CBSA.

Uncompensated representatives include:

  • friends and family members who do not, and will not, charge a fee or receive any other consideration for their advice and services;
  • organizations that do not, and will not, charge a fee or receive any other consideration for providing citizenship or immigration advice or assistance (such as a non-governmental or religious organization);
  • consultants, lawyers and Quebec notaries, and students-at-law under their supervision, who do not, and will not, charge a fee or receive any other consideration to represent you.

Note: You do not have to pay someone for them to be your representative. IRCC will conduct business with an uncompensated representative if an applicant appoints them on their behalf.

Compensated representatives:

Compensated representatives charge a fee or receive some other form of consideration in exchange for the representation that they provide.

It is important to know that anyone who represents or advises you for payment - or offers to do so - in connection with IRCC proceedings or applications is breaking the law unless they are an authorized representative or they have a specific agreement or arrangement with the Government of Canada that allows them to represent or advise you. This applies to advice or consultation which happens before or after a citizenship or an immigration application is made or a proceeding begins.

IRCC will only conduct business with compensated representatives who are in good standing with their designated regulatory body. For more information see - Find out if your representative is authorized.

Note: If a representative is being paid or compensated by someone other than you, the representative is still considered to be a compensated representative.

Authorized representatives are:

  • consultants who are members in good standing of the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC);
  • lawyers and paralegals who are members in good standing of a Canadian provincial or territorial law society and students-at-law under their supervision;
  • notaries who are members in good standing of the Chambre des notaires du Québec and students-at-law under their supervision.

If you appoint a compensated representative who is not a member in good standing of one of these designated bodies, your application will be returned. Learn about using a representative.

General Application Information

Appoint a representative
  • Check box to indicate if you are appointing a representative to represent you with your application process. Complete sections A, B and D.
Cancel a representative
  • Check box to indicate if you are canceling a representative. Complete sections A, C and D; and
  • Check both boxes and complete all sections if you are cancelling a representative and appointing a new one at the same time.

Section A – Applicant Information

Question 1

Write your last name (surname or family name) and given name(s).

Question 2

Write your date of birth.

Question 3
If you have already submitted your application, write:
  • the name of the office where the application was submitted; and
  • the type of application you have submitted.
Question 4

Write your IRCC’s Identification (ID) or Unique Client Identifier (UCI) number (if known). If you have not dealt with IRCC since 1973, you will not have a UCI or a Client ID.

Section B – Appointment of Representative

Question 5

Write your representative’s full name.

If your representative is a member of the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC), a law society or the Chambre des notaires du Québec, print his or her name as it appears on the organization’s membership list.

Question 6

Check one box to indicate if your representative is uncompensated or compensated.

If your representative is compensated, write the membership ID number of:
  • the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC); or
  • a Canadian provincial or territorial law society; or
  • the Chambre des notaires du Québec.
Question 7

Write your representative’s contact information.

If you are appointing a student-at-law to represent you, include their supervising lawyer’s information including their membership ID.

Note: By indicating your representative’s e-mail address, you are hereby authorizing IRCC to transmit your file and personal information to this specific e-mail address.

Question 8

To accept responsibility for conducting business on your behalf, your representative must:

  • sign the declaration; and
  • date the declaration.

Section C – Cancel the Appointment of a Representative

Question 9

Fill in this section if you wish to cancel the appointment of a representative. Write the representative’s full name.

Complete all sections of the form if you wish to both cancel a representative and appoint a new one.

Section D – Your Declaration

Question 10

By signing, you authorize IRCC to complete your request for yourself and your dependent children under 18 years of age.

For sponsorship application, your spouse or common-law partner does not have to complete a separate request. If your spouse or common-law partner is included in this request, he or she must sign in the box provided.

Release of information to other individuals

To authorize IRCC to release information from your case file to someone other than a representative, you will need to complete the form Authority to Release Personal Information to a Designated Individual (IMM 5475). The form is also available from Canadian embassies, high commissions and consulates abroad.

The person you designate under that form (IMM 5475) will be able to obtain information on your case file, such as the status of your application. However, they will not be able to conduct business on your behalf with IRCC.

Where to submit the form

If you have not yet submitted your application:

Send this form along with your application to the office listed in your respective application kit

If you have already submitted your application:

You may use this Web form to upload the IMM 5476.

Or;

If you know which IRCC office is processing your application, send the completed form to the office mailing address. Consult IRCC office mailing addresses.

Notify IRCC about any changes

You must let IRCC know if any information changes regarding the person you authorized to represent you on your application.

If your application was already submitted, use this Web form and upload the IMM 5476.


Step 3. Pay the Fees

Fees

There is no fee for voluntarily renouncing your permanent resident status.

If you are applying for any other documents (for example, a TRV) along with the application to voluntarily renounce your permanent resident status, you must pay the application processing fee for the other document(s).

Step 4. Submit the Application

If you currently live in Canada:

Send your complete application with all supporting documentation to the following address:

(Your name)
(Your address)
(Your postal code)

Affix sufficient postage (top right of the envelope)

Recipient

Renunciation of Permanent Resident Status
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Operational Support Centre
365 Laurier Avenue West
Ground Floor Mailroom, South Tower
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 1L1

If you currently live outside of Canada:

Send your complete application with all supporting documentation to the Canadian visa office responsible for your country of citizenship or legal residence.

Find out where to submit your application

Where are you applying from?

You must have legal status in that country.


If you want to visit Canada and require a TRV based on your country of citizenship or the purpose of your visit, you must submit your TRV application separately from your Voluntary Renunciation of PR status application.

TRV applications must be submitted following the existing instructions for submitting TRV applications, while Voluntary Renunciation of PR status applications must be sent in a separate envelope by mail to the CIC visa office.

We recommend that you apply for Voluntary Renunciation of your PR status first, and apply for your TRV once you receive the approval of your Voluntary Renunciation.



Note

Forms

Before submitting your application, ensure that all forms have been filled out and signed and that you have included all supporting documentation. Your application will not be processed if even one document is missing.


Mail the document checklist

Make sure you use the Document Checklist (IMM 5783) and attach it to your application.


What Happens Next

Upon receiving your completed application, an officer will review your file and determine whether you meet the requirements to renounce your Canadian permanent resident status.

If your application is approved, you will be provided with a document confirming that you no longer have permanent resident status in Canada.


If my request is granted, can I still apply to come to Canada?

If you are outside Canada and have also applied for a temporary resident visa (TRV), it will be assessed and, if you meet the requirements for a TRV, one will be issued to you. If you have not applied for a TRV and would like to visit Canada, you may be required to apply for one, depending on your country of citizenship and the purpose of your visit.


If my request is granted, can I still remain in Canada?

If you are inside Canada, you are allowed to remain in Canada for six months as a temporary resident. If you would like to remain in Canada longer than six months, you must apply to extend your stay in Canada.


Online services

For more information on the programs offered by Citizenship and Immigration Canada, visit Immigration and Citizenship.


Protecting your information

Your personal information is:

  • available to CIC and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) employees who need to see it in order to provide the services to you, and
  • not disclosed to other organizations except as permitted under the provisions of the Privacy Act or the Citizenship Regulations.

For more information. You can obtain additional information on the protection of your data by visiting the Help Centre.


Need help?

If you need help, you can find answers to your questions by consulting the Help Centre.


Appendix A: Photo specifications

Notes to the applicant

Take this information with you to the photographer

  • Make sure that you provide the correct number of photos specified in the Checklist.
  • You must provide identical and unaltered photographs.
  • Photographs may be in colour or in black and white.
  • Photographs must be original and not altered in any way or taken from an existing photograph.
  • Photographs must reflect your current appearance (taken within the past six (6) months).

Notes to the photographer

The photographs must be:

  • taken by a commercial photographer;
  • 50 mm x 70 mm (2 inches wide x 2 3/4 inches long) and sized so the height of the face measures between 31 mm and 36 mm (1 1/4 inches and 1 7/16 inches) from chin to crown of head (natural top of head);
  • clear, sharp and in focus;
  • taken with a neutral facial expression (eyes open and clearly visible, mouth closed, no smiling);
  • taken with uniform lighting and not show shadows, glare or flash reflections;
  • taken straight on, with face and shoulders centred and squared to the camera (i.e. the photographs must show the full front view of the person’s head and shoulders, showing the full face centered in the middle of the photograph);
  • taken in front of a plain white background with a clear difference between the person’s face and the background. Photographs must reflect and represent natural skin tones.
Image described below

The back of one (1) photograph must:

  • bear the name and date of birth of the subject, as well as the name and complete address of the photography studio;
  • bear the date the photograph was taken;
  • The photographer may use a stamp or handwrite this information. Stick-on labels are unacceptable.

Find out if you are eligible

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