Multiculturalism

Through multiculturalism, Canada recognizes the cultural heritage and the potential of all Canadians, encouraging them to integrate into Canadian society and take an active part in its social, cultural, economic and political affairs.

Games and puzzles

Come in and play games that will help you learn your school subjects in a fun way! All the games are directly related to citizenship, immigration and multiculturalism.

Black History Month

Every year in February during Black History Month, Canadians take part in events that honour the legacy of black Canadians, past and present.

Asian Heritage Month

May is Asian Heritage Month, dedicated to acknowledging the long and rich history of Asian Canadians and their contributions to Canada.

Commemorating the Holocaust

Between March 5, 2013 and February 25, 2014, Canada led international efforts to commemorate the Holocaust as Chair of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance. There are many resources available to Canadians who want to learn more about:

Human Rights

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) co-ordinates the federal activities related to the implementation of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD). The ICERD is a United Nations convention which promotes and encourages universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction based on race, sex, language or religion.

The War of 1812

To recognize the War of 1812's impact on Canadian history and identity, Citizenship and Immigration Canada marked the bicentenary with activities, and the development of educational resources.

Recognizing Leadership

Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism

The Paul Yuzyk Award commemorates the late Senator Yuzyk’s pioneering legacy establishing multiculturalism as one of the fundamental characteristics of Canadian identity.

Komagata Maru

Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Komagata Maru incident

The Komagata Maru steamed into Vancouver in May 1914. Its passengers, mostly Sikhs from Punjab, India and all British subjects, challenged Canada's Continuous Journey clause, which was put in place in part to limit immigration from non-European countries. After two months under difficult conditions, the ship and most of its passengers were forced to return to India where, in a subsequent clash with British soldiers, 19 passengers died.

Discover Canada

Study for your citizenship test and learn about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship
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