ARCHIVED – Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration, 2011

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SECTION 3
Federal–Provincial/Territorial Partnerships

Jurisdiction over immigration is a joint responsibility under section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867, and effective collaboration between the Government of Canada and the provinces and territories is essential to the successful management of the immigration program. Provincial and territorial governments are primary partners of Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), and the shared goal is to make immigration programs responsive to the unique economic, social and labour market needs of each province and territory. Under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act, the Minister for CIC has the authority, with the approval of the Governor in Council, to sign agreements with the provinces and territories to facilitate the coordination and implementation of immigration policies and programs. Table 7 provides a list of the key bilateral agreements currently in force, with their signing and expiry dates.

Framework agreements with eight provinces and one territory highlight immigration as a key area for bilateral collaboration and formalize how governments work together on this issue. Agreements for a Provincial Nominee Program are also in place with 11 jurisdictions (Yukon Territory, Northwest Territories and all provinces except Quebec), either as an annex to a framework agreement or as a stand-alone agreement.

Under a Provincial Nominee Program, provinces and territories have the authority to nominate individuals as permanent residents to address specific labour market and economic development needs. Under the Canada–Quebec Accord, Quebec has full responsibility over the selection of immigrants (except Family Class and in-Canada refugee claimants), as well as the sole responsibility for delivering integration services. The federal government is responsible for establishing eligibility criteria for settlement programs in the other provinces and territories, reuniting families, determining refugee claims within Canada, defining immigration categories, setting national immigration levels, and establishing admission requirements.

In 2010, negotiations were underway to put in place successor arrangements for the Canada–Manitoba Immigration Agreement and the Canada–Ontario Immigration Agreement. As of December 31, 2010, these negotiations had not been concluded.

Table 7: Federal–Provincial/Territorial Agreements Currently in Force
Agreement Date Signed Expiry Date
Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Agreement on Provincial Nominees November 22, 2006
(Original signed in September 1999)
Indefinite
Agreement for Canada–Prince Edward Island Co-operation on Immigration June 13, 2008
(Original signed in March 2001)
Indefinite
Agreement for Canada–Nova Scotia Co‑operation on Immigration September 19, 2007 Indefinite
Canada–New Brunswick Agreement on Provincial Nominees January 28, 2005
Amended: March 29, 2005
(Original signed in February 1999)
Indefinite
Canada–Quebec Accord Relating to Immigration and Temporary Admission of Aliens February 5, 1991 Indefinite
Canada–Ontario Immigration Agreement November 21, 2005 November 21, 2010; one-year extension of the agreement expired March 31, 2011
Canada–Manitoba Immigration Agreement June 6, 2003
(Original signed in October 1996)
Indefinite
Canada–Saskatchewan Immigration Agreement May 7, 2005
(Original signed in March 1998)
Indefinite
Agreement for Canada–Alberta Cooperation on Immigration May 11, 2007 Indefinite
Canada–British Columbia Immigration Agreement April 9, 2010
(Original signed in May 1998)
April 8, 2015
Agreement for Canada–Yukon Co‑operation on Immigration February 12, 2008
(Original signed in April 2001)
Indefinite
Canada–Northwest Territories Agreement on Provincial Nominees August 5, 2009 August 5, 2012

* “Other” includes post-determination refugee claimants, deferred removal orders and temporary resident permit holders.

Table 8: Permanent Residents Admitted in 2010, by Destination and Immigration Category
Category NL PE NS NB QC ON MB SK AB BC YT NT NU Not Stated Total
ECONOMIC CLASS
Skilled Workers 175 49 877 272 34,240 53,885 898 712 11,513 16,659 27 43 7 0 119,357
Business Immigrants 12 4 107 57 2,489 4,419 24 20 305 5,860 5 0 0 0 13,302
Provincial and Territorial Nominees 217 2,419 638 1,352 80 1,528 12,178 5,354 7,492 4,900 269 1 0 0 36,428
Live–in Caregivers 9 2 39 13 1,082 7,310 139 124 2,277 2,884 9 20 1 0 13,909
Canadian Experience Class 7 2 24 33 25 2,360 37 33 811 571 0 10 4 0 3,917
Total Economic Class
(including dependants)
420 2,476 1,685 1,727 37,916 69,502 13,276 6,243 22,398 30,874 310 74 12 0 186,913
FAMILY CLASS
Spouses, Partners, Children and Others 104 44 424 194 8,201 20,653 1,175 649 5,660 7,716 30 39 7 0 44,896
Parents and Grandparents 11 2 25 17 1,428 8,688 202 77 1,712 3,149 4 9 0 0 15,324
Total Family Class 115 46 449 211 9,629 29,341 1,377 726 7,372 10,865 34 48 7 0 60,220
PROTECTED PERSONS
Government–assisted Refugees 155 53 146 146 1,732 2,607 460 337 885 743 0 0 0 0 7,264
Privately Sponsored Refugees 3 0 53 3 482 2,515 514 199 579 485 0 0 0 0 4,833
Protected Persons In-Canada 2 3 15 5 1,710 6,476 38 23 472 296 0 0 0 1 9,041
Dependants Abroad 0 0 4 3 787 2,316 20 15 268 143 2 0 0 0 3,558
Total Protected Persons 160 56 218 157 4,711 13,914 1,032 574 2,204 1,667 2 0 0 1 24,696
OTHER
Humanitarian and Compassionate Grounds/Public Policy 19 3 56 30 1,708 5,294 121 58 658 771 4 13 0 1 8,736
Other* 0 0 0 0 16 59 3 14 10 5 0 2 0 0 109
Total Other 19 3 56 30 1,724 5,353 124 72 668 776 4 15 0 1 8,845
Category Not Stated 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7
TOTAL 714 2,581 2,408 2,125 53,982 118,114 15,809 7,615 32,642 44,183 350 137 19 2 280,681
PERCENTAGE 0.3 0.9 0.9 0.8 19.2 42.1 5.6 2.7 11.6 15.7 0.1 0 0 0 100%

Source: Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Facts and Figures 2010.

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