ARCHIVED – Details of Transfer Payment Programs

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Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada–Quebec Accord Grant / Subvention versée en vertu de l’Accord Canada–Québec

Start Date: Financial compensation to the province (in the form of a grant) is based on the Canada–Quebec Accord, which came into force on April 1, 1991.

End Date: The Accord does not have an expiry date.

Description: The Canada–Quebec Accord relating to immigration gives Quebec the responsibility for providing settlement and integration services to all immigrants in Quebec, including all refugees. Quebec receives an annual grant from the federal government to support these settlement and integration services.

Objective/anticipated outcomes: An objective of the Canada–Quebec Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec’s demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants into the province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec.

Activities: Quebec has responsibility for the selection, reception and integration of immigrants into Quebec. In accordance with section 26 of the Canada–Quebec Accord, Canada is required to pay compensation to Quebec, where it is established that:

  • the reception and integration services offered by Quebec correspond, when considered in their entirety, with those offered by Canada in the rest of the country; and
  • those services are offered without discrimination to all permanent residents in the province, whether or not they have been selected by Quebec.

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Results Achieved: The Government of Quebec is responsible for developing and publishing its own expected results related to immigration.

Program Activity: Settlement and Integration of Newcomers
($ millions)
  2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12
Planned
Spending
2011-12
Total
Authorities
2011-12
Actual
Spending
Variances
Total Grants 234.2 258.4 258.4 283.1 283.1 (24.7)
Total Contributions - - - - - -
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - - - -
Total Program Activity 234.2 258.4 258.4 283.1 283.1 (24.7)

Comment on Variance: Actual spending was $24.7 million higher than planned due to adjustments in the final payment. The final payment is based on a formula in the Accord.

Audit Completed or Planned: Not applicable

Evaluation Completed or Planned: An evaluation of the grant component of the Canada–Quebec Accord was completed in 2011–12.

Engagement of Applicants and Recipients: Not applicable



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP)

Start Date: 1970s (as the Adjustment Assistance Program); RAP in its current form implemented 1998

End Date: Ongoing

Description: RAP provides direct financial support and funds the provision of immediate and essential services to eligible recipients who lack the resources to provide for their basic needs and the needs of their dependants (e.g., government-assisted refugees; privately sponsored refugees in blended sponsorships; and persons admitted under section 25.2, public policy considerations, of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act).

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Results Achieved: The expected results of RAP include meeting the immediate and essential needs of RAP clients, as well as ensuring that:

  • RAP services are timely, useful and accessible;
  • resettled newcomers are linked to Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) settlement services and to other government services; and
  • these newcomers have increased life skills and the knowledge and means to live safely and independently.

To facilitate these expected results, the RAP performance measurement strategy was launched in January 2012 to measure the outcomes of the program more efficiently.

In March 2012, the RAP terms and conditions were amended to increase the flexibility of the program, and now include non-refugee vulnerable groups in compelling humanitarian situations as eligible recipients of RAP. These persons are admitted under section 25.2 (public policy considerations) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

Program Activity: Settlement and Integration of Newcomers
($ millions)
  2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12
Planned
Spending
2011-12
Total
Authorities
2011-12
Actual
Spending
Variances
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 56.5 54.0 56.7 56.7 54.2 2.5
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - - - -
Total Program Activity 56.5 54.0 56.7 56.7 54.2 2.5

Comment on Variance: CIC committed to additional government-assisted refugees under the Balanced Refugee Reform Act. Because of delays in their arrival, however, $2.5 million lapsed at the end of the fiscal year.

Audit Completed or Planned: Not applicable

Evaluation Completed or Planned: Not applicable

Engagement of Applicants and Recipients: Stakeholders, such as service provider organizations in receipt of RAP funding, have been engaged during the course of program renewal of the RAP terms and conditions.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Historical Recognition Program (CHRP)

Start Date: 2006–07

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: CHRP provides funding for community-based projects that commemorate or recognize the historical experiences of selected ethnocultural communities affected by federally legislated wartime measures and immigration restrictions or prohibitions. The program also educates the Canadian public concerning the contributions made by these communities to shaping Canada. Eligible communities include: Chinese-Canadians, Jewish-Canadians, Indo-Canadians and Italian-Canadians.

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Results Achieved: During 2011–12, 15 new projects received ministerial approval, bringing the overall total of funded projects to 69.

Of special note was the documentary project Lost Years, produced by the Chinese Graduates Association of Alberta, which chronicles 150 years of Chinese Diaspora history in Canada, the United States, New Zealand and Australia. It was the winner of the 2011 Best Documentary Award (History and Culture) at the Guangzhou International Documentary Film Festival, and nominated for numerous other awards in 2012 including: six Rosies at the 38th Alberta Film and Television Awards; the Golden Sheaf Award at the 65th Yorkton Film Festival; and Best Documentary Cinematography at the 55th Canadian Society of Cinematographers Gala Awards.

In 2011–12, the terms and conditions of CHRP were extended to March 31, 2013, to allow for completion of funded projects.

Program Activity: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians
($ millions)
  2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12
Planned
Spending
2011-12
Total
Authorities
2011-12
Actual
Spending
Variances
Total Grants 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.2
Total Contributions 1.6 2.9 5.1 6.2 6.2 (1.1)
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - - - -
Total Program Activity 1.9 3.2 5.3 6.2 6.2 (0.9)

Comment on Variance: Actual spending was higher than planned in 2011–12. As a result, the 2012–13 spending for CHRP will be less than planned.

Audit Completed or Planned: No audit of CHRP was completed during 2011–12. However, an audit of the management control framework over all grants and contributions programs is planned for 2012–13.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: An evaluation is currently being conducted, with planned completion in 2012–13.

Engagement of Applicants and Recipients: Representative advisory committees (no longer active) for each ethnocultural or faith community were involved in the selection of projects to be funded. Engagement with recipients is now limited to claims processing and overall project management. Recipients are normally contacted once per month by project officers.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Multiculturalism Program

Start Date: 1982–83

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The program objectives are to:

  • build an integrated socially cohesive society;
  • improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and
  • engage in discussions on multiculturalism and diversity at an international level.

The Multiculturalism Program works to build an integrated cohesive society by fostering intercultural understanding, citizenship, civic memory and pride, as well as respect for core democratic values grounded in our history, and by promoting equal opportunity for individuals of all origins.

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Results Achieved: The Projects stream of Inter-Action provides funding for long-term, multi-year activities that support building an integrated, socially cohesive society. In 2011–12, funding was approved for 30 projects for a total of $7,658,378.

The Events stream of Inter-Action provides funding for community events that foster intercultural understanding, civic memory and pride, and respect for core democratic values. In 2011–12, 202 events received funding approval amounting to $1,848,601.

Public education programs such as Black History Month, Asian Heritage Month and the Paul Yuzyk Award continued to be carried out in support of program’s objectives.

Program Activity: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians
($ millions)
  2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12
Planned
Spending
2011-12
Total
Authorities
2011-12
Actual
Spending
Variances
Total Grants 0.1 1.0 3.0 1.9 1.9 1.1
Total Contributions 4.1 5.8 7.8 6.6 6.6 1.2
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - - - -
Total Program Activity 4.2 6.8 10.8 8.5 8.5 2.3

Comment on Variance: The $2.3-million surplus is caused by recipients not spending as planned. A significant portion of the 2011–12 planned spending has been moved to the 2012–13 planned spending
.

Audit Completed or Planned: No audit of the Multiculturalism transfer payment program was completed during 2011–12. However, an audit of the management control framework over all grants and contributions programs is planned for 2012–13.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: An evaluation of the Multiculturalism Program was completed in 2011–12 and will be posted on the CIC website in 2012–13.

Engagement of Applicants and Recipients: Non-project-specific replies are provided to potential applicants prior to submission in response to a Call for Proposals. Applicants are contacted during the project assessment process as per departmental service standards. Once selected for funding, recipients are engaged to ensure smooth project management and claims processing.



Name of Transfer Payment Program: Settlement Program

Start Date: May 15, 2008

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: The Settlement Program provides services that make a difference in the lives of newcomers. These services include: language training; information and referrals; assistance matching employment with newcomers’ skills and education; and help with establishing networks and contacts in their communities.

The terms and conditions for the Settlement Program describe both eligible recipients of contribution funding and eligible clients. The eligible recipients (often referred to as service providers) for settlement services include the following:

  • provincial, territorial or municipal governments;
  • not-for-profit organizations including non-governmental organizations, non-profit corporations, community groups and umbrella organizations;
  • businesses;
  • educational institutions (including school boards, districts and divisions); and
  • individuals.

Eligible clients for settlement services are primarily permanent residents. However, they may also include some prospective immigrants and refugees who are highly likely to obtain permanent residency, but have not yet received their permanent resident visa. These include, for example, individuals who have been selected by CIC pending completion of medical, security and criminal verification requirements.

Strategic Outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Results Achieved: CIC provides funding for the delivery of settlement services across Canada and pre-arrival orientation sessions overseas. Despite an 8-percent reduction in the settlement funding envelope, CIC increased the number of clients served in Canada and overseas by 3 percent from 207,057 the previous year to 213,346 in 2011–12. CIC continues to reach more potential immigrants overseas in an effort to help them achieve better outcomes once they arrive in Canada. While the number of clients served in Canada was relatively stable, there was a 68-percent increase in the number of clients served overseas.

In recent client surveys and a pilot survey, CIC found that:

  • 84 percent of respondents indicated that settlement information from a government source was useful for their settlement in Canada;
  • 93 percent of respondents indicated that opportunities to meet with employers and people who work in their field of choice was very useful or somewhat useful in finding employment;
  • 97 percent of respondents reported having made friends since arriving in Canada; and
  • two-thirds of respondents who received CIC-funded services reported that they better understand life in their community and in Canada, they interact with Canadians and other people in the community, and they have a better understanding of rights and responsibilities in Canada.

Overall, after having received CIC settlement services, clients have seen improvements in their abilities to find and apply for employment by adapting their skills and experience to the Canadian labour market. Newcomers are also creating strong connections within their communities.

Program Activity: Settlement and Integration of Newcomers
($ millions)
  2009-10
Actual
Spending
2010-11
Actual
Spending
2011-12
Planned
Spending
2011-12
Total
Authorities
2011-12
Actual
Spending
Variances
Total Grants - - - - - -
Total Contributions 641.7 628.1 611.8 608.9 593.7 18.1
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments - - - - - -
Total Program Activity 641.7 628.1 611.8 608.9 593.7 18.1

Comment on Variance: The lapse can be explained by planned spending on behalf of recipients that did not materialize.

Audit Completed or Planned: No audit of the Settlement Program was completed during 2011–12. However, an audit of the management control framework over all grants and contributions programs is planned for 2012–13. In addition, an enhanced follow-up of the audit of the administration of Settlement Programs is planned for 2013–14.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: An evaluation of the Settlement Program is scheduled to be completed in 2016–17. It will include the following streams: information and orientation; language training and skills development; labour market access; and welcoming communities.

Engagement of Applicants and Recipients: CIC engages recipients through the Settlement and Integration Joint Policy and Program Council, which meets twice a year with representatives from CIC, settlement service providers, umbrella organizations and provinces.

Date Modified: