ARCHIVED – Departmental Performance Report

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For the period ending
March 31, 2012

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Table of Contents

MINISTER’S MESSAGE

SECTION I: ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW

SECTION II: ANALYSIS OF PROGRAM ACTIVITIES BY STRATEGIC OUTCOME

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy

Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted

Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians

Program Activity 5.1: Internal Services

Changes to Government Structure

SECTION III: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

SECTION IV: OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST

MINISTER’S MESSAGE

I am pleased to present the 2011–2012 Departmental Performance Report for Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC).

Immigration has always been a sustaining feature of Canada’s history and continues to play an important role in building our country. Canada welcomed 248,748 permanent residents in 2011. This number is consistent with the average of about a quarter of a million immigrants admitted annually since 2006—the highest sustained level of immigration in Canadian history. Over the past year, CIC has announced major reforms to Canada’s immigration system that will lead to a fast and flexible system designed to help our economy grow.

Despite record-high rates of admittance, demand to immigrate to Canada far exceeds the total number of immigrants accepted each year. This has led to large immigration application backlogs. Accordingly, CIC introduced limits on the intake of new applications, which has helped to reduce the pre-2008 federal skilled worker (FSW) backlog significantly—from more than 640,000 people at its peak in 2008 to fewer than 300,000 people as of March 31, 2012. Under Bill C-38, which received Royal Assent on June 29, 2012, we will eliminate the bulk of the remaining backlog of pre-2008 FSW applications, which will allow CIC to focus resources on facilitating the arrival of skilled immigrants who apply under the current eligibility criteria, and who possess the skills and talents that our economy needs today. It is essential that we create a just-in-time immigration system that allows newcomers to “hit the ground running” and ease their entry into the labour force market, as well as their settlement and integration in Canada.

To contend with the large backlog and lengthy wait times in the Family Class, CIC introduced the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification. As part of the action plan, we increased by over 60 percent the number of sponsored parents and grandparents that Canada will admit this year—from nearly 15,500 in 2010 to 25,000 in 2012. We also launched the Parent and Grandparent Super Visa—another element of the action plan—as an option for parents and grandparents to visit their families in Canada for an extended period of time, and which has been a huge success.

Canada is committed to its international obligations to protect persecuted persons. We already accept one in 10 resettled refugees—more than any other country in the world—but we are enhancing our tradition of refugee protection by increasing by 20 percent the number of resettled refugees Canada accepts from around the world. To this end, Canada worked closely with international partners to resettle refugees fleeing religious persecution, including Eritrean refugees fleeing the Libyan crisis, Iraqis displaced in Syria, Iranians in Turkey, and Bhutanese in Nepal.

Canada has also been leading efforts to combat anti-Semitism through active involvement in the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education Remembrance and Research (ITF). This past December, the ITF confirmed Canada as its Chair for 2013.

Immigration fraud undermines the integrity of our immigration system, and CIC initiated several reforms to combat it. Legislation to crack down on unscrupulous immigration consultants came into force in June 2011 and will better protect applicants from dishonest immigration representatives who seek to defraud and victimize. CIC also introduced measures to crack down on marriage fraud and deter people from using relationships of convenience to circumvent Canada’s immigration laws. Other regulatory changes that came into force this past year reinforce the integrity of Canada’s Family Class sponsorship program. For example, individuals who have committed a serious criminal offence will be ineligible for sponsoring family members. Individuals who do not respect Canadian law and commit a serious crime should not benefit from the privilege of sponsorship.

This past February, we introduced legislation to prevent foreign criminals, human smugglers and those with unfounded refugee claims from abusing Canada’s fair and generous immigration system. The Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act—which received Royal Assent in June 2012—builds upon reforms to the asylum system that were introduced in June 2010 as part of the Balanced Refugee Reform Act.

Under the Canada-U.S. Action Plan on Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness, launched in December 2011, we are working with our security partners to improve verification of visitor identities, pre-arrival screening of visitors to North America, and the management of flows of people across our borders.

We also made it easier this past year for foreign nationals studying at the PhD level to stay in Canada. PhD students and recent graduates are now eligible to apply for permanent residence through the Federal Skilled Worker Program. This will help Canada and Canadian universities to remain competitive in the global market in attracting and retaining top talent.

Moreover, following a substantial increase in the number of study and work permits issued in recent years, last November Canada welcomed the 10,000th permanent resident to be admitted through the Canadian Experience Class since its launch in 2008.

Live-in caregivers can now expect to receive open work permits about 18 months sooner as a result of a processing change announced in December 2011. With an open work permit, caregivers enjoy the flexibility to establish their own home and to seek jobs in other fields.

The government takes seriously its responsibility to ensure that newcomers have the support they need to settle in Canada and integrate into Canadian society. For this reason, we have tripled settlement funding since 2006. Our settlement programs are recognized internationally as being among the best, but we also acknowledge that more can be done to ensure that newcomers successfully meet all of the necessary requirements for citizenship, including the ability to speak English or French. Accordingly, we proposed that the Citizenship Regulations require adult citizenship applicants to provide objective evidence of language ability with their citizenship applications.

These accomplishments could not have been possible without the hard work, support and professionalism of all CIC staff members. I want to thank employees of CIC for their commitment and dedication to the work that is integral to Canada’s continued strength and success.

______________________________________________
The Honourable Jason Kenney, PC, MP
Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism

SECTION I: ORGANIZATIONAL OVERVIEW

Raison d’être

In the first years after Confederation, Canada’s leaders had a powerful vision: to connect Canada by rail and make the West the world’s breadbasket as a foundation for the country’s economic prosperity. This vision meant quickly populating the Prairies, leading the Government of Canada to establish its first national immigration policies. Immigrants have been a driving force in Canada’s nationhood and its economic prosperity—as farmers settling lands, as workers in factories fuelling industrial growth, as entrepreneurs and as innovators helping Canada to compete in the global, knowledge-based economy.

Responsibilities

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) selects foreign nationals as permanent and temporary residents and offers Canada’s protection to refugees. The Department develops Canada’s admissibility policy, which sets the conditions for entering and remaining in Canada; it also conducts, in collaboration with its partners, the screening of potential permanent and temporary residents to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. Fundamentally, the Department builds a stronger Canada by helping immigrants and refugees settle and fully integrate into Canadian society and the economy, and by encouraging and facilitating Canadian citizenship. To achieve this, CIC operates 24 in-Canada points of service and 86 points of service in 72 countries.

CIC’s broad mandate is partly derived from the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act. The Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada is responsible for the Citizenship Act of 1977 and shares responsibility with the Minister of Public Safety for the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), which came into force following major legislative reform in 2002. CIC and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) support their respective ministers in the administration and enforcement of IRPA. These organizations work collaboratively to achieve and balance the objectives of the immigration and refugee programs.

Finally, under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, CIC promotes the integration of individuals and communities into all aspects of Canadian society and helps to build a stronger, more cohesive society.

Jurisdiction over immigration is a shared responsibility between the federal and the provincial and territorial governments under section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867. Under the Constitution, provinces and territories have the authority to legislate immigration matters, as long as such legislation is consistent with federal laws. Under IRPA and the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act, the Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada, with the approval of the Governor in Council, has signed agreements with the provinces and territories to facilitate the coordination and implementation of immigration policies and programs.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Activity Architecture

In 2011–2012, CIC adopted its new Program Activity Architecture (PAA) to better reflect the Department’s mandate and sharpen its focus on outcomes. CIC’s four strategic outcomes describe the long-term results that the Department’s programs are designed to achieve. The Department’s PAA, summarized below, is a reporting framework that links CIC’s strategic outcomes to departmental program activities. In the initial stages of conversion to this more detailed PAA, historical spending data was not available at this level of detail. To develop planned spending numbers, it was necessary to make certain assumptions for estimating an appropriate allocation of resources by program activity. As CIC began to track spending according to the new PAA, it became evident that a realignment of planned spending between program activities was required. This has resulted in significant changes between planned spending and total authorities for several program activities.

Figure 1: CIC’s Program Activity Architecture

Figure 1: CIC’s Program Activity Architecture

Text version: Figure 1: CIC’s Program Activity Architecture

Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Improving/modernizing client service Ongoing SO 1, 2, 3, 4

CIC is advancing an ambitious modernization agenda that is transforming service delivery across its network. The purpose is to render services more accessible and expedient for clients while ensuring program integrity and reducing costs. To achieve these goals, CIC is focusing on more effectively and efficiently managing risk, which is key to guiding what it does and how; managing the workload to optimally integrate how and where CIC works; and managing the work force to optimize its human resources. Building on 2010–2011 client service modernization results, CIC continued to optimize the use of technology to increasingly leverage CIC’s global network.

The Department continues to innovate and modernize with enhancements to the Global Case Management System (GCMS). With the international roll-out of GCMS completed, the last year saw all in-Canada CIC offices integrate temporary resident lines of business, Family Class sponsorship and four other permanent resident lines of business into GCMS—ahead of schedule. This is a significant advancement toward CIC’s modernization vision of all immigration and citizenship processing using one integrated system. In addition, GCMS has the capacity to associate electronic images with applications and clients through e‑storage, laying the foundation for paperless processing and anchoring future large initiatives such as biometrics and eMedical. The Department also introduced a new electronic validation portal for citizenship status in February 2012. Partners such as the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Passport Canada, and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) and some provinces such as Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and British Columbia use this portal and can electronically validate citizenship certificates of clients presenting for services. A manual validation process is also available for partners/provinces. This initiative resulted in efficiencies for partners, and increased program integrity for the Citizenship Program.

Recognizing GCMS as the linchpin of its modernization agenda, the Department took its first steps to integrate GCMS with CIC’s suite of eServices: incorporating the GCMS Document Management application into MyCIC (CIC’s on-line application service). This allowed visa application centres (VACs) to submit completed 2D [Note 1] barcode application forms electronically to CIC. The applications are automatically loaded into GCMS and, following a quality control verification, they are ready for a review and decision. With the success of this year’s pilot with five VACs, the roll-out to remaining VACs will continue next year.

CIC further centralized its intake, expanding the applications received at the Centralized Intake Office in Sydney, Nova Scotia, from only federal skilled worker applications to include all Economic Class lines of business. Centralization improves workload management, which leads to consistent decision making and better processing times, and, ultimately, better service to clients. In addition, the Case Processing Pilot—Ottawa, established in early 2010, now plays an important role in workload distribution as well as enhancing CIC’s overall processing capacity by processing less complex cases in Canada.

CIC is also advancing the implementation of the Temporary Resident Biometrics Project. The project aims to improve the identification of travellers seeking to enter Canada, thereby reducing identity fraud, reducing entry of inadmissible persons, and generally enhancing the safety and security of Canadians. In June 2012, the project successfully transitioned from the planning and design phase into the deployment readiness phase. CIC, CBSA and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police worked collaboratively to define the plans for implementing the project. Fujitsu Canada was awarded the technology contract in February 2012 for the design, development and testing of the technological portion of Canada’s biometrics system with a view to begin taking biometric data for certain clients by mid-2013.

In 2011–2012, the Department opened an additional 24 VACs in 22 countries, bringing the network total to 60 VACs in 41 countries. VACs provide administrative support to applicants before, during and after their application is assessed at a CIC visa office abroad. On January 31, CIC posted a competitive solicitation to expand the current network of VACs into a global network. This network will provide the platform for biometric collection capabilities, standardize services and further enhance service delivery by providing access to services closer to home. The contract award is scheduled for fall 2012, which will allow for increased coverage by the beginning of 2013.


Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Renewing a strategic focus on outcomes New SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

In 2011–2012, CIC prepared the first annual update to its 2010–2015 Strategic Plan, providing the Department with an occasion to assess achievements made in 2010 against the broader five-year context and adjust its plans early. CIC regularly reviews environmental challenges and opportunities in light of its longer-term policy and research agendas and its operational network, and reallocates resources as necessary to support the achievement of its policy and operational goals. In its continued support of alignment of resources against outcomes-focused plans, CIC strengthened performance measurement capacity, focused senior management’s early direction setting on longer-term outcomes and established a departmental evaluation plan based on strategic outcomes.


Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Strengthening performance management New SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

To strengthen overall performance measurement at CIC and support the implementation of its PAA and Performance Measurement Framework, CIC developed a Performance Measurement Action Plan (PMAP) in 2011–2012. The PMAP recognizes that performance needs to be measured at various levels of the organization (departmental, program, operational and corporate services) and that it is essential to align this work and to support measurement through ongoing investments in performance measurement data sources. To strengthen the results-based culture in the Department, CIC undertook capacity-building activities:

  • performance measurement workshops were delivered to senior management and policy and program analysts;
  • a performance measurement guide started to be developed;
  • resources and tools were disseminated;
  • advice was provided to programs and services; and
  • a governance structure was instituted to provide oversight and to ensure that effective data collection and analysis yield the performance results needed to inform decision making.

In addition, an exercise to revamp the Performance Measurement Framework was undertaken in the fall of 2011 to improve outcomes-based indicators and to address a number of gaps in current data and targets; this work will continue until the summer of 2012. Furthermore, under the PMAP, research data development was prioritized to secure performance measurement data availability in the medium to long term.

Finally, in December 2011, the Department launched an initiative to modernize delivery of grants and contributions, which will result in stronger program integrity and accountability through better risk management throughout the business process. The Funding Risk Assessment Model, a key tool for adjusting the management of contribution agreements according to risk, was implemented in March 2012.


Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Emphasizing people management Ongoing SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

CIC has continued to improve integration of its human resources (HR) with business and financial planning. Besides providing managers with improved quarterly HR dashboards and analyses, CIC has introduced a quarterly presentation to the Executive Committee on HR management issues identifying trends, recommendations and strategies in support of effective, efficient and prudent people management.

The Department established recruitment targets, including for post-secondary recruits, based on specific departmental staffing strategies. These were monitored and reported to senior management, which allowed for continued alignment with business needs. Integrated performance evaluation and learning plan forms were launched across the Department, and strategies in the 2010–2013 Official Languages Plan and the 2010–2013 Employment Equity Plan were also reviewed to ensure they support people management excellence.

The Modernizing Training Project strengthened CIC’s learning approach by making learning activities more accessible, integrated, timely and responsive to client requirements. This included reviewing training approaches as well as strengthening the Department’s systems and processes to capture and monitor learning data. In addition, the national implementation of competency-based learning roadmaps, which outline both the required and recommended training for a position, was approved.

In 2011–2012, the Department’s Integrated Change Leadership Framework continued to be the foundation for improving CIC’s capacity to adapt to change. CIC ensured that leaders, managers and employees were properly equipped and supported to adapt and respond in a complex environment.


Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Promoting management excellence and accountability Ongoing SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling

After the release of the findings of the first client satisfaction survey, several branches undertook improvements to internal services to address identified issues. Quarterly reporting on service standards also helped focus compliance efforts.

Taking inventory of CIC’s more than 200 internal management rules led to almost half of them being rescinded; the rest were retained or revised as required. This resulted in internal management rules and regimes that are clearer, simpler and more accessible.

The Learning Management Framework, which sets out CIC’s vision for learning and development as well as three key departmental learning priorities for two years (2011–2013), was reviewed, approved and implemented.

To address Treasury Board Secretariat observations and recommendations from previous Management Accountability Framework (MAF) assessments, the Department developed a MAF action plan and integrated reporting within its quarterly reporting process. As a result, CIC management practices and MAF results improved.


Risk Analysis

CIC’s Corporate Risk Profile identifies potential risks to the achievement of the Department’s strategic outcomes. The profile is reviewed annually and monitored quarterly by the Executive Committee.

In 2011–2012, CIC introduced significant reforms to the immigration system to respond better to Canada’s economic needs. These reforms, as announced in Budget 2012, set the stage for transformative change in Canada’s approach to selecting newcomers with the skills the country needs. Improving program integrity and public health and safety were integral aspects of reform along with new process improvements to achieve better client service. Section II of this report discusses some mitigation strategies in detail, but the following discussion highlights CIC’s operating environment, as well as challenges and risks the Department faces:

Meeting Economic Objectives of the Immigration Program

Immigration has always played an important role in building the nation and meeting Canada’s labour market needs. As the global economic outlook remains uncertain, the structure of the Canadian economy continues to evolve. The demand for highly skilled labour and certain trades is increasing, while regional labour market needs are diversifying. At the same time, the economic outlook for some immigrants is declining and barriers to newcomers entering the labour market persist. Canada’s future success will rely, in significant part, on selecting immigrants who can meet the needs of Canada’s changing labour market and having in place settlement programs necessary to maximize all newcomers’ contributions to the Canadian economy.

CIC prioritized several activities in 2011–2012 that will, in the long run, support the government’s objective to build a faster and more flexible immigration system with a primary focus on meeting Canada’s economic and labour market needs. To ensure strong labour market outcomes, CIC and provincial and territorial partners agreed to establish a minimum language threshold and mandatory language testing for low-skilled provincial nominees. CIC developed a strategy to reform the Federal Entrepreneur Program; implemented new Ministerial Instructions, and created a new eligibility stream in the Federal Skilled Worker Program for international students pursuing PhD studies in Canada. CIC will also introduce changes to the Federal Skilled Worker Program and the Canadian Experience Class in the year ahead, and create a new Federal Skilled Trades Program by the end of 2012.

In terms of mitigating the risk of poor outcomes arising from barriers to labour market integration, CIC continued its commitment to facilitating the labour market access of newcomers through the Settlement Program, which fund language training, employment services, information and orientation, and building professional connections. It also supported the development of a micro-loans pilot program to assist newcomers with the costs associated with foreign credential recognition processes. The Department developed the International Qualifications Network website to enable the sharing of innovative practices in foreign credential recognition and continued the advancement of the Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications. CIC also implemented new citizenship test questions to ensure integrity of the test.

Collaboration with Partners to Support Outcomes

Managing citizenship, immigration and multiculturalism requires CIC to work with a range of international and domestic partners. Inadequate partnership arrangements among various levels of government may result in overlap, duplication and excessive complexity. Lack of effective engagement with employers, communities and other stakeholders may diminish the benefits of immigration. CIC works with domestic and international partners to ensure effective delivery of programs and services. The Department has also developed strategies and approaches to facilitate, strengthen and manage partnerships.

CIC collaborated with provincial and territorial partners on priorities under the Federal–Provincial–Territorial Vision Action Plan. Corresponding work plans were developed for the mapping of settlement services across the country, Provincial Nominee Program improvements, a common engagement and stakeholder consultation strategy, the rationalization of selection systems/economic immigration programs, and a multi-year levels plan. As a result of federal–provincial–territorial collaboration, a common set of outcomes and indicators were developed and a survey undertaken to both assess newcomers’ settlement outcomes across Canada and inform a pan-Canadian framework on settlement outcomes.

As part of the 2010–2012 Blueprint for Engagement, CIC developed a stakeholder engagement action plan and a senior management outreach program. The outreach program aims to use ongoing management activities as a springboard to reach out to key stakeholder groups involved in or affected by the Department’s policies, programs or issues. Local immigration partnerships are being expanded across the country to engage multiple stakeholders to address newcomer settlement issues in their respective jurisdictions via coordinated strategies. Through the Settlement and Integration Joint Policy and Program Council, CIC has involved the settlement sector in the development of a performance measurement strategy for CIC’s settlement program, and has supported the settlement sector’s study of innovative and promising practices of settlement service provider organizations. Finally, CIC committed to Parliament, through its response to the Report on Best Practices in Settlement Services, to promote and share best practices in settlement that lead to successful outcomes for newcomers. An initial inventory of 50 best practices from across the country was completed in consultation with provinces, territories and the settlement sector, and will be posted and updated regularly on CIC’s website.

Health, Safety, Security and Program Integrity

An increasingly mobile and interconnected world calls for well-managed, safe and secure migration programs. Risks to health, safety and security require advances in information sharing between partners and measures to address threats to program integrity. To that end, CIC has implemented a number of enhancements within the health program and will improve governance and collaboration with government departments and international partners in relation to fraud, enforcement and intelligence.

Initiatives to strengthen program integrity include:

  • amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations to expand the list of criminal charges and relationships that will bar future family sponsorships;
  • the introduction of a five-year sponsorship bar for recently sponsored spouses and partners;
  • the pre-publication of regulatory amendments to introduce a period of conditional permanent residence for sponsored spouses and partners;
  • the continuing implementation of the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification, including the introduction of the Parent and Grandparent Super Visa and a temporary pause on the acceptance of new sponsorship applications of parents and grandparents;
  • further reforms to the in-Canada refugee system, as contained in the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act, to improve on reforms proposed in the Balanced Refugee Reform Act;
  • inventory management in the Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program through the introduction of a cap on new applications from private sponsors;
  • the development of a proposed eligibility framework for provincially regulated educational institutions under the regulatory initiative to enhance the integrity of the International Student Program;
  • the publication of a Notice of Intent for consulting on a proposal to amend the Citizenship Regulations to require citizenship applicants to provide objective evidence of their language ability at the time of application, with the aim to better determine whether prospective citizens have the language abilities to participate fully in Canadian society; and
  • the implementation of CIC’s Program Integrity Framework.

The Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act includes measures to address human smuggling and contains authorities for a requirement to provide biometric data with each temporary resident visa application. On the health front, CIC completed a policy review of the Interim Federal Health Program. With regard to safety and security, in 2011–2012 CIC advanced the Temporary Resident Biometrics Project; the Canada–U.S. joint Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness Action Plan (which will focus on addressing threats early; facilitating trade, economic growth and jobs; integrating cross-border law enforcement; and improving critical infrastructure and cyber-security); the development of a coordinated international strategy; and the implementation of new measures that support travel and tourism by providing for fee-exempt temporary resident permits in specific circumstances.

Technology, Modernization and Innovation

Technological progress poses both opportunities and challenges for CIC. Existing technology, such as biometrics, helps establish the identity of visitors, reduces the likelihood of entry of inadmissible persons, and significantly enhances the security and safety of Canadians. However, there is a risk that CIC objectives and programs will not be adequately supported by the existing operational procedures, or by outdated information management/information technology infrastructure and systems. As such, the Department continued to modernize its system infrastructure.

This progress includes the implementation of the next version of the GCMS in all in-Canada offices, which enabled the increased use of centralized intake and processing to increase efficiencies and enhance functionality of GCMS; expansion of the VAC network; ongoing deployment of 2D barcode forms for overseas applications; enhanced CIC website content to ensure quality service to Canadians; and progress in work with Australia to develop eMedical.

Summary of Performance

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
1,575.2 1,636.6 1,583.5

2011–2012 Human Resources (full-time equivalents—FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
4,759 4,845 (86)

Explanation of change: Planned spending of $1,575.2 million increased by a net amount of $61.4 million due to Supplementary Estimates and other funding adjustments to provide total authorities of $1,636.6 million. The overall increase in authorities includes additional funding for the Canada–Quebec Accord on Immigration, funding to meet obligations for employee severance entitlements under collective agreements, and operating funding carried forward from the previous fiscal year. Increased authorities were partially offset by funding set aside to reprofile in future years and the transfer of resources to Shared Services Canada for the consolidation of information technology functions.

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $53.1 million. Operating resources totalling $35.4 million lapsed, allowing the Department to maximize the carry-forward of funds to the next fiscal year. These lapses resulted from lower than projected costs for the implementation of new visa requirements in Mexico, new refugee reform measures, the Temporary Resident Biometrics Project and other general operating lapses. Lower than planned expenditures in the Settlement and Resettlement Assistance programs resulted in $17.7 million in grants and contributions lapsing.

Actual FTEs reflect the increased amount of funding made available through Supplementary Estimates, which were not included in planned FTEs, net of the FTEs transferred to Shared Services Canada.

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy
Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance

Proportion of permanent residents earning higher income three to five years after landing

40% or above

  • 39% had higher incomes just three years after landing;
  • 46% had higher incomes four years after landing; and
  • 49% of permanent residents had higher incomes five years after landing.

The most recent landing cohort with tax returns filed up to five years since landing is the 2005 cohort. For this group, nearly 50% were earning income higher than the Canadian average, five years after landing. Consistent with previous research, it may take several years following arrival in Canada to achieve such good outcomes. It is expected that the target of 40% will be surpassed sooner than the expected target year of 2015, since the cohorts arriving after 2005 are expected to have better overall outcomes as a result of the application of IRPA selection criteria.

Rank within the Organization for Economic Co‑operation and Development (OECD) of employment rate for all immigrants

Maintain top five country ranking

The 2011 OECD International Migration Outlook indicates that in 2010 the average employment rate of foreign-born workers in Canada was 68.8%, which is the fourth highest rate for foreign-born workers among 28 OECD countries.

Level of dispersion of temporary foreign workers and students across the country

Actual mean dispersion [Note 2] not less than the low benchmark

Temporary foreign workers had a mean average dispersion in 2011 of 0.80, with three provinces (Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia) exceeding the mean, but with a lower standard deviation (suggesting dispersion closer to the average).

The dispersion of foreign students across Canada reveals a similar pattern, but student arrivals are more concentrated in British Columbia, followed by Ontario and Nova Scotia. These jurisdictions receive a disproportionately higher share of international students.


($ millions) Program Activity 2010–2011 Actual Spending 2011–2012 Alignment to Government of Canada Outcome
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
1.1 Permanent Economic Residents †† 52.9 63.7 41.1 36.5 Economic Affairs: Strong economic growth
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents †† 24.8 24.8 29.9 23.7 Economic Affairs: Strong economic growth
Total for SO 1   77.7 88.5 71.0 60.2  

Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance

Number of protected persons (resettled refugees and protected persons determined in Canada by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada or positive pre-removal risk assessment decisions) and their dependants abroad granted permanent residence

23,200 to 29,000 persons, as identified in the 2011 immigration levels plan

In 2011, 27,872 protected persons were admitted to Canada, which exceeded the lower number of the planned range (23,200–29,000) in the annual levels plan by 20%, and is within the planned range.

Number of people reunited with their families compared to the annual immigration levels plan

58,500 to 65,500 persons, as identified in the 2011 immigration levels plan

In 2011, 56,446 people were reunited with their families (spouses, partners, children, parents and grandparents), which is 4% below the lower end of the planned range of 58,500–65,500.

This stream is non-discretionary and fully responsive to the volume of applications received. The lower numbers reflected a decline in application intake and are the result of some operational challenges in in-Canada processing of spouses/partners and children.

Number of persons granted permanent resident status on humanitarian and compassionate or public policy grounds due to their exceptional circumstances

7,700 to 9,200 persons, as identified in the 2011 immigration levels plan

In 2011, 8,306 persons were admitted under humanitarian and compassionate grounds, under public policy grounds or as permit holders, which exceeds the lower end of the planned range of 7,700–9,200 by 8%, and is within the planned range.


($ millions) Program Activity 2010–2011 Actual Spending 2011–2012 Alignment to Government of Canada Outcome
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending

2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration

††

50.2

61.0

47.8

45.1

Social Affairs:

A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion

2.2 Refugee Protection

††

31.1

31.1

38.5

33.4

International Affairs:

A safe and secure world through international engagement

Total for SO 2

 

81.3

92.1

86.3

78.5

 

Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society
Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance

Comparative income disparities among the four populations [Note 3]/relative poverty among groups

Reduce gap by 1% per year [Note 4]

Compared with the Canadian-born, non-visible minority population, the income gap for immigrant visible minority groups was approximately 54% for men and 47% for women; for foreign-born non-visible minorities was 35% for men and 39% for women; and for Canadian-born visible minorities was 18% for men and 4% for women. [Note 5]

It is clear that both immigrant and visible minority status have an impact on income disparities, with a particularly evident gender impact on Canadian-born visible minority men.

Announced changes to immigrant selection criteria, as well as the continued evolution of settlement, integration and multiculturalism programming, should assist in the reduction of these disparities in the medium term.

Comparative rates of connections across the four population groups

Increase to 90% foreign-born visible minorities that report all or most of their friends are not co-ethnics

22% of foreign-born visible minorities, 33% of Canadian-born visible minorities, 8% of Canadian-born non-visible minorities, and 5% of foreign-born non-visible minorities report that all or most of the friends that they contacted within the last month are from a visibly different group. [Note 6]

It is clear from this data that the non-visible minority populations are the least likely to have regular connections with people of diverse backgrounds while the foreign-born are far more likely to report close connections with people of diverse backgrounds.

The community connections aspects of the Settlement Program and multiculturalism programming will continue to create opportunities for newcomers and Canadians of diverse backgrounds to interact.

Comparative voting rates among the four populations

Maintain current level (for the 2008 federal election, the participation rate for immigrants/visible minorities was 71%)

2011 voting rates for the entire eligible population were 66.5%, with 67.1% among the Canadian-born, 66.3% among established immigrants and 51.1% among recent immigrants. [Note 7]

While voter participation rates of the foreign-born continue to converge with the Canadian-born over a relatively short period of time, this is less true for immigrants from some world regions.

As CIC continues to incorporate citizenship preparation initiatives into the Settlement Program, to expand the Citizenship Program’s outreach initiatives and to deepen its collaboration with other agencies like Elections Canada, these disparities should decrease over the medium term.

Comparative attitudes held by the four groups regarding acceptance of rights and responsibilities and value of diversity

Maintain current attitudes regarding citizenship values and responsibilities and toward diversity as an important building block of the Canadian identity [Note 8]

Data comparable to that collected in 2010 is not available, therefore direct comparisons are not possible. However, a similar survey found:

  • 62% of Canadians felt that multiculturalism is good for Canada [Note 9];
  • 88% of the foreign-born and 81% of the Canadian-born reported feeling “very proud” to be Canadian;
  • 41% of the foreign-born and 33% of the Canadian-born reported that good citizens “obey laws”; and
  • 12% of the foreign-born and 8% of the Canadian-born reported that good citizens vote. [Note 10]

The foreign-born continue to demonstrate that their level of attachment to Canada exceeds that of the Canadian-born and that their understanding of what is required of citizens is superior to that of the Canadian-born.


($ millions)
Program Activity
2010–2011
Actual Spending
2011–2012 Alignment to Government of Canada Outcome
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending

3.1 Settlement and Integration of Newcomers

††

960.5

960.5

985.3

966.0

Social Affairs:

A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion

3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians

††

42.2

42.2

53.4

49.4

Social Affairs:

A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion

3.3 Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians

††

26.7

26.7

21.3

21.1

Social Affairs:

A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion

Total for SO 3

 

1,029.4

1,029.4

1,060.0

1,036.5

 

Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians
Performance Indicators Targets 2011–2012 Performance
Tuberculosis (TB) incidence among foreign-born compared to TB incidence in Canada Maintain a TB incidence ratio of 13.3 over 4.8 or less The Tuberculosis in Canada Report indicates that this ratio was 13.3:4.7 or less in 2009, the latest year for which the data is available.
Ratio of cases refused over number of inadmissible cases identified 100% of inadmissible cases identified are processed according to regulations and policies in place 100% of applications identified to be medically inadmissible on grounds of risk to public health and safety were refused; others eligible for processing under exemptions for excessive demand were processed.
Number and nature of positions developed in respect of international policy debate on international migration Not applicable 34 positions have been developed in international forums/bilateral meetings that have been reflected in policy debate on international migration.
Number of draft resolutions negotiated on immigration, migration and human rights of migrant workers Not applicable CIC was engaged in 20 resolutions: five with the United Nations Human Rights Council, five with the Organization of American States and 10 with the United Nations General Assembly.

($ millions)
Program Activity
2010–2011
Actual Spending
2011–2012 Alignment to Government of Canada Outcome
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending

4.1 Health Management

††

56.4

95.4

93.2

92.3

Social Affairs:

Healthy Canadians

4.2 Migration Control and Security Management

††

49.4

73.3

72.6

66.8

Social Affairs:

A safe and secure Canada

4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

††

2.5

2.5

3.1

3.1

International Affairs:

A safe and secure world through international engagement

Total for SO 4

 

108.3

171.2

168.9

162.2

 

($ millions) Program Activity 2010–2011 Actual Spending 2011–2012
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
5.1 Internal Services †† 194.0 194.0 250.4 246.1

($ millions) 2010–2011 Actual Spending 2011–2012
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
Total Department Spending 1,590.1 1,490.7 1,575.2 1,636.6 1,583.5

† Total authorities and actual spending excludes amount deemed appropriated to Shared Services Canada.

†† CIC implemented a new PAA for 2011–2012 that is not comparable to previous years.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada’s commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision making by articulating its key strategic environmental goals and targets. CIC ensures that consideration of these outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. CIC contributes to the FSDS theme Shrinking the Environmental Footprint—Beginning with Government as denoted by the visual identifier below:

Theme 4 - Shrinking the Environmental Footprint - Beginning with Government
For Program Activity 5.1: Internal Services

During 2011–2012, CIC considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to The Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. Through the strategic environmental assessment process, departmental initiatives were found to have no environmental effects on goals and targets in any theme.

CIC implemented a Sustainable Development Policy Framework, which brings together the principles of sustainable development as stated in the Federal Sustainable Development Act. This framework effectively links the goals and targets of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy to The Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals. It also ensures that decisions better integrate social, economic and environmental factors to support the most equitable outcomes for current and future generations. This is done through the requirement that all CIC memorandums to Cabinet (MCs) and Treasury Board submissions undergo a sustainable development analysis (SDA) even where no strategic environmental analysis would be required. CIC developed SDAs as required. For all, the sustainable development impacts were zero to slightly positive, and, overall there were no environmental impacts and slight positive economic or security impacts.

For further information on CIC’s activities to support sustainable development and strategic environmental assessments, please visit the departmental sustainable development web page. For complete information on the FSDS, please visit the Environment Canada website.

Expenditure Profile

Departmental Spending Trend

During 2011–2012, CIC’s spending to meet the objectives of its program activities amounted to $1,583.5 million. The following graph illustrates CIC’s spending trend from previous years and planned spending for future years to 2014–2015.

Grants and Contributions

Grants and contributions spending increased significantly in the year prior to 2009–2010, due to additional settlement contribution funding for all provinces and territories and additional obligations under the grant for the Canada–Quebec Accord on Immigration. Total grants and contributions funding in future years remains constant at approximately 63 percent of total planned spending.

Operating Expenditures

The overall level of operating expenditures has remained relatively even from year to year, despite increased funding for certain initiatives. Additional operating funding has been provided, for example, for the modernization of the immigration system, the implementation of new visa requirements, and the Temporary Resident Biometrics Project. These increases have been largely offset, however, by the effects of spending reviews, reductions due to foregone revenue, and transfers to other departments.

Estimates by Vote

For information on CIC’s organizational votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2012 (Volume II) publication.

SECTION II: ANALYSIS OF PROGRAM ACTIVITIES BY STRATEGIC OUTCOME [Note 11]

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy

CIC plays a significant role in fostering Canada’s economic development. By promoting Canada as a destination of choice for innovation, investment and opportunity, CIC encourages talented individuals to come to Canada and to contribute to its prosperity. Canada’s immigration program is based on non-discriminatory principles—foreign nationals are assessed without regard to race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, religion or gender. Those who are selected to immigrate to Canada have the skills, education, language competencies and work experience to make an immediate and long-term economic contribution.

CIC’s efforts, whether through policy and program development or processing applications for the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Quebec Skilled Worker Program, the Provincial Nominee Program or other programs, attract thousands of qualified permanent residents each year. Under the 2008 amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada has the authority to issue instructions establishing priorities for processing certain categories of applications. In that regard, the Department analyses and monitors its programs to ensure they are responsive to emerging labour market needs.

CIC also facilitates the hiring of foreign nationals by Canadian employers on a temporary basis and implements a number of initiatives to attract and retain international students.

Benefits for Canadians

Immigration continues to have a significant influence on Canadian society and economic development. Permanent residents who arrive in Canada enhance Canada’s social fabric, contribute to labour market growth and strengthen the economy. Changes that modernize and improve the immigration system are designed not only to strengthen the integrity of the Permanent Economic Residents program activity but also to benefit Canada by targeting skills Canadian employers need and admitting qualified individuals more quickly.

Temporary foreign workers help generate growth for a number of Canadian industries by meeting short-term and acute needs in the labour market that are not easily filled by the domestic labour force. International students contribute economically as consumers and enrich the fabric of Canadian society through their diverse experiences and talents. Some temporary workers and international students represent a key talent pool to be retained as immigrants, as evidenced by growth in the Canadian Experience Class and Provincial Nominee Program.

Canada’s Immigration Plan for 2011

The immigration levels set out in Canada’s immigration plan for 2011 reflect the important role of immigration in supporting Canada’s economic growth and prosperity. In addition, the plan fulfils the objectives of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Actto reunite families and uphold Canada’s international humanitarian obligations. Further details can be found in the Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration 2011.

New Permanent Residents Admitted in 2011, by Immigration Category (Compared with the Immigration Plan) [Note 12]
Immigrant Category 2011 Plan Target Ranges Number Admitted
Low High
ECONOMIC CLASS
Federally Selected Economic Class* 74,000 80,400 82,251
Principal Applicants† 33,200 36,600 31,683
Spouses and Dependants† 40,800 43,800 50,568
Provincially Selected Economic Class* 76,600 80,900 73,870
Principal Applicants† 31,900 33,800 32,673
Spouses and Dependants† 44,700 47,100 41,197
Provincial Nominee Program 42,000 45,000 38,420
Principal Applicants† 17,500 18,800 15,296
Spouses and Dependants† 24,500 26,200 23,124
Quebec-selected Skilled Workers and Business 34,600 35,900 35,450
Principal Applicants† 14,400 15,000 17,377
Spouses and Dependants† 20,200 20,900 18,073
Subtotal Economic Class—Principal Applicants 65,100 70,400 64,356
Subtotal Economic Class—Spouses and Dependants 85,500 90,900 91,765
Total Economic Class 150,600 161,300 156,121
FAMILY CLASS 
Spouses, Partners and Children 45,500 48,000 42,368
Parents and Grandparents 13,000 17,500 14,078
Total Family Class 58,500 65,500 56,446
PROTECTED PERSONS
Government-assisted Refugees 7,400 8,000 7,364
Privately Sponsored Refugees 3,800 6,000 5,582
Protected Persons in Canada 8,200 10,500 10,743
Dependants Abroad of Protected Persons in Canada 3,800 4,500 4,183
Total Protected Persons 23,200 29,000 27,872
OTHER  
Humanitarian and Compassionate Grounds/Public Policy 7,600 9,000 8,218
Permit Holders 100 200 88
Total Other 7,700 9,200 8,306
TOTAL 240,000 265,000 248,748

* Admission projections for economic immigration in 2011 were based on selecting and/or nominating jurisdiction because the direct involvement of provinces and territories in economic immigration had grown. Under the Canada–Quebec Accord Relating to Immigration and Temporary Admission of Aliens, the Government of Quebec has responsibility for selecting immigrants destined to its province, and other jurisdictions participating in the Provincial Nominee Program have the responsibility to nominate foreign nationals for permanent resident status.

†The number of principal applicants and spouses and dependants was estimated based on historical averages.

Program Activity 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents

Rooted in legislative requirements outlined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the focus of this program activity is on the selection and processing of immigrants who can become permanent residents and contribute to Canada’s economic development. The acceptance of qualified permanent residents helps the government meet its economic objectives, such as building a skilled work force, by addressing immediate and longer term labour market needs. The selection and processing involve the issuance of permanent resident visas to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
63.7 41.1 36.5

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
509 304 205

Explanation of change: Total authorities decreased by $22.6 million compared with planned spending, primarily due to the realignment of estimated authorities under the new PAA implemented in 2011–2012.

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $4.6 million, due to general operating lapses, which will be carried forward to the next fiscal year.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs is due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012. Historical information on planned FTEs by program activity was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Permanent residents selected to contribute to the growth of the Canadian labour force Growth in labour force attributed to economic migration Not applicable. Net labour force growth as of 2012–2015 46.3%
Degree to which lower end number of planning range in the annual immigration levels plan commitments is met for number of permanent residents selected for economic reasons 100% of 150,600 for 2011 156,121
Economic success of permanent residents selected for economic reasons (as measured by employment rates, labour market participation, wages) compared with the economic success of the Canadian-born Permanent residents’ economic success equal to Canadian-born within five to seven years after landing  -12%

Explanation of actual results: For the first indicator, it is estimated that, in 2011, 46.3 percent of net labour force growth in Canada was attributed to economic immigrants (15 years of age and older). The figure is higher when all immigrants (economic and non-economic immigrants) are factored in: about 50 percent of net labour force growth in Canada was attributed to all immigrants.

Immigration contributes around 100,000 new entrants into the Canadian labour force a year. [Note 13] While Canadian entrants into the labour force (mainly school leavers) continue to make up the large majority of new labour market entrants—there are four times as many Canadian new entrants as immigrant new entrants—immigrants (in all categories) comprise around 50 percent of net labour force growth. Therefore, while not the largest source of new labour force participants, immigration is a significant source for net labour force growth, particularly in the long term, where overall labour force participation is expected to decline due to higher rates of retirement and a low replacement rate from Canadian new entrants.

The 156,121 Economic Class immigrants admitted to Canada in 2011 noted for the second indicator exceeded the lower number of the planned range (150,600–161,300) in the annual levels plan by four percent. The levels plan commitment was met for the number of permanent residents selected for economic reasons.

For the third indicator, recent immigrants (five to 10 years after landing) have average weekly wages approximately 12 percent lower than the Canadian-born. In recent years the wages of permanent residents have tended to increase relative to the Canadian-born with additional years since landing. Established immigrants (those who landed 10 years or more ago) have higher weekly wages than those arriving more recently (five to 10 years), and higher than the Canadian-born.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

Immigration levels planning will be aligned with CIC’s current initiatives to prepare the immigration system to support Canada’s ongoing economic needs, including a transformed application management system, in which backlogs would not accumulate and decisions would be made in 6–12 months.

CIC has seen continued and significant progress on the Government of Canada’s three main goals as articulated in the fall 2008 Action Plan for Faster Immigration: reduction of the backlog of applicants in the federal skilled worker category; reduction of wait times; and improvement of labour market responsiveness. Through the use of its existing tools such as Ministerial Instructions and the levels plan, CIC has managed application intake based on labour market needs and allowed for more rapid backlog reduction. CIC issued four sets of Ministerial Instructions between 2008 and 2011 that limit new federal skilled worker applicants to those meeting Canada’s labour market needs. When CIC launched the Action Plan for Faster Immigration in 2008, the pre-2008 federal skilled worker backlog was estimated at 641,000 people, with wait times of over five years. By December 31, 2011, this backlog was reduced by over 50 percent—two years ahead of the projected schedule.

CIC has also used Ministerial Instructions and the levels plan to manage application intake in other streams and increase labour market responsiveness. For example, the fourth set of Ministerial Instructions, issued November 5, 2011, put a temporary pause on the intake of sponsorship applications for parents and grandparents (as part of the 2011 Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification), and created a new eligibility stream in the Federal Skilled Worker Program for international students pursuing PhD studies in Canada and recent graduates.

Furthermore, CIC began exploring ways to transform the existing application management system to allow Canada’s immigration system to be fast, flexible and responsive. New Zealand (in 2003) and Australia (starting July 2012) have introduced an expression of interest [Note 14] immigration application management system, in place of the conventional, applications-driven processing system, such as Canada’s. In March 2012, CIC officials undertook a fact-finding visit to New Zealand and Australia, which allowed CIC to begin assessing the feasibility of implementing an expression of interest-based application management system in Canada that can better respond to labour market needs and ensure backlogs do not accumulate.

In February and March 2011, CIC held consultations with stakeholders and the public to seek input on a number of proposed changes to the Federal Skilled Worker Program. Based on an evaluation of the program, academic research and best practices in other immigrant-receiving countries, the proposed changes aim to help Canada select immigrants who have the best chance of integrating and making a contribution to the Canadian economy. CIC consulted on the proposals to:

  • require federal skilled workers to have a minimum level of language proficiency;
  • make the program more accessible to skilled tradespeople and technicians;
  • place greater emphasis on younger immigrants who will adapt more easily and be active members of the work force for a longer time;
  • redirect points awarded for foreign work experience to other factors that better contribute to success in the Canadian labour market; and
  • reduce the potential for fraudulent job offers.

Stakeholders and the general public were invited to provide feedback through an on-line questionnaire. In-person consultations were also held with key stakeholders in Ottawa, Toronto, Calgary and Vancouver. The input received through these consultations has been summarized in a published report, and comments received have since been taken into account in the development of new draft regulations. Proposed regulatory amendments are expected to be prepublished early in 2012–2013 in the Canada Gazette, as a further and more detailed form of consultation with public and program stakeholders.

The Canadian Experience Class (CEC) offers a pathway to permanent residency for international students and skilled and highly skilled temporary foreign workers. Through the CEC, those eligible can apply from within Canada and expect a decision quickly. The CEC is one of the Government of Canada’s innovations aimed at ensuring Canada retains talented and motivated individuals who have demonstrated an ability to contribute to the economy. Applications under the program, though initially low, have steadily increased since its inception and in 2011 Canada welcomed its 10,000th immigrant selected under the program. The planned evaluation of the CEC has been rescheduled to start in 2013–2014, to support better analysis of data on outcomes. The CEC program was launched late in 2008, and immigrants began to arrive in Canada under the program only in 2009. The evaluation will examine the relevancy and results of the program, with a report on findings to be published in the first half of 2014–2015.

Program Activity 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents

Rooted in legislative requirements outlined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the focus of this program activity is on processing and facilitating the entry into Canada of temporary workers and students. Temporary economic migration benefits Canada’s economic growth. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas, work permits and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
24.8 29.9 23.7

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
238 262 (24)

Explanation of change: Total authorities increased by $5.1 million over planned spending, primarily due to authorities transferred through Supplementary Estimates to support the International Experience Canada program.

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $6.2 million, due to lower than projected costs for visa implementation in Mexico and other general operating lapses.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs was due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012. Historical information on planned FTEs by program activity was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 RPP.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Temporary foreign workers and students selected to benefit Canada’s economic development Proportion of labour market opinions requiring temporary foreign workers that are paid minimum wage or above 100% for 2011 No actual results to report as this performance indicator has been discontinued because it falls outside CIC’s mandate
Approval rates of temporary worker applications for temporary foreign worker permits 90% (Average acceptance rate in recent years) 92%
Approval rates of student applications for study permits 81–85% (Planning range based on five-year average and confidence interval: α=0.05) 81%

Explanation of actual results: Approval rates for both temporary foreign worker and student applications were in line with expectations.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The Temporary Foreign Worker Program is jointly managed by CIC and HRSDC. The ministers for HRSDC and CIC hosted a stakeholder consultation in September 2011, in Alberta, outlining their intention to work together to identify needed improvements to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP). The subsequent review that took place in 2011–2012 confirmed the need to make program changes, in particular to make the program more responsive to skills and labour shortages, with less red tape for employers with strong track records, and to ensure temporary foreign workers benefit from enhanced protection. CIC will continue to review the program through 2012–2013 to assess whether additional measures are warranted to improve its responsiveness to employer needs while ensuring it acts as a complement rather than a substitute for programs for Canadian and permanent resident workers.

In the context of the review of the TFWP, CIC initiated a review of the Live-in Caregiver Program (LCP) in 2011–2012. The LCP is a distinct stream within the TFWP and Economic Class, as a category of foreign worker with a prescribed path to permanent residence. The preliminary analysis of the program conducted in 2011–2012 will support further discussion in 2012–2013 on the role of the LCP as a component of the r TFWP.

A processing change announced in December 2011 allows live-in caregivers working in Canada to obtain open work permits sooner. They can now obtain open work permits once they have applied for permanent residence, after fulfilling the obligations of their initial work permit (work for two years, or 3,900 hours, as a live-in caregiver for a named employer). Previously, they would receive an open work permit only after initial approval of their permanent residence application, in many cases requiring them to continue working as live-in caregivers long after their initial obligations under the program had been fulfilled. The processing change is intended to support the settlement of live-in caregivers intending to remain in Canada while awaiting the processing of their application for permanent residence.

In addition to the r review of the program, CIC worked with HRSDC over 2011–2012 to identify priority changes needed to increase the effectiveness of the TFWP. Options to be further developed in 2012–2013 include a risk-management approach that would make access to foreign workers faster for employers with proven track records in terms of compliance and respect for conditions.

Regulatory amendments aimed at enhancing the integrity of the International Student Program were not finalized as planned in 2011–2012. Significant progress was made on the two main elements of the proposal, including major steps of the regulatory process as well as the development of a policy framework outlining an approach to the designation of educational institutions in support of proposed regulations. The Educational Institutional Eligibility Framework, developed by CIC together with the provinces and territories, was reviewed by provincial and territorial governments in 2011–2012 and will now be put forward as a basis for public consultations in the fall of 2012–2013. As a first step in advancing the regulatory proposal, a Notice of Intent was published in summer 2012 to engage stakeholders early in the process, Final publication of regulatory changes is likely to take place by December 2012, with the new regulations coming into force as early as June 2013.

Lessons Learned for Strategic Outcome 1

Fiscal year 2011–2012 saw the continued evolution of the use of Ministerial Instructions and the levels plan to advance the Government of Canada’s main goals for economic immigration and backlog reduction in various streams. The fourth set of Ministerial Instructions (MI-4) built on lessons learned from the previous sets of Ministerial Instructions, offering a direct approach to application intake management and helping to limit new applications in the parents and grandparents stream. Combined with a higher admission levels range for parents and grandparents in 2012, MI-4 enables faster backlog reduction for this stream. However, CIC’s ongoing use of Ministerial Instructions for application management also revealed that the ad hoc nature of Ministerial Instructions has limitations. As such, at the end of the fiscal year, CIC began exploring a new application management system for federal skilled workers and examining changes for parent and grandparent sponsorships that would entail more structural transformations.

The International Student Program brings significant benefit to Canada, evolving in recent years to ensure Canada remains competitive in attracting international students to its educational institutions. One innovation involved expanded work opportunities for international students in Canada, with the provision of on-campus, off-campus and post-graduate work permits to eligible students. An unintended consequence, however, has been that many individuals coming to Canada to study may be motivated by the opportunity to work in Canada. To ensure international students are choosing to come to Canada principally to pursue education, CIC is developing a regulatory proposal that will place new requirements on students and institutions. These include the requirement that the student be actively enrolled in a program of study and actively attending that program. Other changes attached to that proposal will bring overall enhancements to the integrity of the International Student Program to better support the goals of the program.

Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted

CIC is committed to upholding Canada’s humanitarian tradition of reuniting families, resettling refugees and providing protection to those in need.

The Family Class, as set forth in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, allows permanent residents and Canadian citizens to sponsor their immediate family members (i.e., their spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, and dependent children), as well as parents and grandparents, for immigration to Canada. The permanent resident or Canadian citizen must undertake to provide for the basic needs of their sponsored relative for a set period of time, depending on the nature of the relationship. This program facilitates family reunification while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public.

As a signatory to the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, the 1967 Protocol relating to the Status of Refugees, and the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, and further to provisions set forth in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Canada has international and domestic legal obligations to provide safe haven to individuals in need of protection. Canada meets these obligations through the in-Canada refugee status determination system. In addition, Canada partners with other countries and with international and civil society organizations to come to the aid of individuals in need of protection through resettlement. Every year, Canada resettles 10,000 to 12,000—or one out of every 10—of the refugees resettled globally. CIC engages both domestic and international stakeholders to develop and implement timely, efficient and effective refugee protection policies and programs.

Benefits for Canadians

Promoting human rights and protecting refugees has been a cornerstone of Canada’s humanitarian tradition since the Second World War. CIC plays a significant role in upholding Canada’s international and domestic obligations and reputation with regard to refugees and in promoting the Canadian values of democracy, freedom, human rights and the rule of law. Through family sponsorship, CIC’s efforts enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents to reunite with family members.

Program Activity 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration

CIC facilitates family reunification by enabling eligible foreign nationals to be sponsored by family members in Canada who are Canadian citizens or permanent residents. Spouses and partners, dependent children (including adopted children), and other eligible relatives such as parents and grandparents are welcomed to Canada under this program. [Note 15] CIC may also grant permanent resident or other status to persons who would not otherwise qualify in any immigration category, in cases where there are strong humanitarian and compassionate considerations, or for public policy reasons. Such exceptional and discretionary immigration measures provide the flexibility to approve deserving cases not anticipated in the legislation.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
61.0 47.8 45.1

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
481 450 31

Explanation of change: Total authorities decreased by $13.2 million compared with planned spending, due to a change in the profile of planned funding for the modernization of the immigration system and due to the realignment of estimated authorities under the new PAA implemented in 2011–2012.

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $2.7 million, due to general operating lapses that will be carried forward to the next fiscal year.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs is due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012. Historical information on planned FTEs by program activity was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 RPP.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada reunites families and provides assistance to those in need while balancing Canada’s social, economic and security priorities Degree to which lower end number of planning range in the annual immigration levels plan commitments is met for number of immigrants granted humanitarian and compassionate consideration 100% of 7,600 admissions for 2011 for humanitarian grounds 8,218
Percentage of humanitarian and compassionate decisions that are upheld by the Federal Court Due to the nature of this performance indicator, no target was established for this indicator in 2011–2012 99.6%

Explanation of actual results: For the first indicator, 8,218 persons were admitted in 2011 under humanitarian and compassionate or public policy grounds, which exceeds the lower end of the planned range of 7,600–9,000 by 8 percent, and is within the planned range.

For the second indicator, 99.6 percent of humanitarian and compassionate decisions of 2011–2012 were upheld by the Federal Court in 2011 (although not all are referred to the Federal Court).

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

Regulatory amendments came into force in November 2011 to strengthen the bar on family sponsorships where a sponsor has been convicted of certain offences. The amended regulations prevent a sponsor convicted of a violent offence against anyone (if punishable by a maximum term of imprisonment of at least 10 years) from sponsoring a member of the Family Class to come to Canada. The amendments also expand the list of relationships that are included under the bar on sponsorship when a sponsor has been convicted of an offence causing bodily harm against a member of the family.

On March 2, 2012, new regulatory amendments were put into force that bar new permanent residents sponsored as a spouse, common-law or conjugal partner from sponsoring a subsequent spouse, common-law or conjugal partner for an uninterrupted period of five years following the date for which they were granted permanent residence. The primary intent of the amendments is to create a disincentive for a sponsored spouse or partner to use a relationship of convenience as a means of circumventing Canada’s immigration laws, abandoning their sponsor soon after becoming a permanent resident, then seeking to sponsor a new spouse or partner.

Also in March 2012, proposed regulatory amendments were prepublished in the Canada Gazette, specifying that spouses or common-law or conjugal partners who are in a relationship of two years or less with their sponsor, and having no children in common with their sponsor at the time of sponsorship application, would be subject to a two-year period of conditional permanent residence. The conditional permanent residence measure is also intended to address fraud in sponsorships under the Family Class or the spouse and common-law partner in Canada category. The measure aims to deter people in new relationships from using their relationship to gain quick entry to Canada as permanent residents when they have no intention of staying with their sponsor. The coming into force of this measure is expected to take place in fall 2012.

Provisions for the enforcement of sponsorship undertakings under sections 25, 25.1 and 25.2 of IRPA were included in the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act,which was introduced in Parliament on February 16, 2012. Proposed changes to humanitarian and compassionate and public policy provisions, as well as to section 13 of IRPA, included:

  • restricting requests for humanitarian and compassionate consideration while a refugee claim is pending and re-introducing the one-year bar on access to these provisions for failed refugee claimants. Exceptions to the one-year bar will be made where removal would have an adverse effect on the best interests of a child, or where there is a risk to life caused by a health or medical condition for which no adequate care is available in the applicant’s home country;
  • authorizing the creation of broader sponsorship regulations for permanent and temporary immigration streams; and
  • restricting requests for humanitarian and compassionate consideration to applications in the permanent stream.

Program Activity 2.2: Refugee Protection

The Refugee Protection program activity is in the first instance about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted. One arm of the program starts overseas where refugees and persons in refugee-like situations are selected by Canadian visa officers to be resettled as permanent residents to Canada. Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, the in-Canada asylum system evaluates the claims of individuals seeking asylum in Canada and grants permanent residence when a positive decision is rendered by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
31.1 38.5 33.4

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
300 365 (65)

Explanation of change: Total authorities increased by $7.4 million over planned spending, due to operating budget carried forward from the previous fiscal year and due to the realignment of estimated authorities under the new PAA implemented in 2011–2012.

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $5.1 million, due to refugee reform funding set aside to reprofile in future years and other general operating lapses.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs is due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012. Historical information on planned FTEs by program activity was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 RPP.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canada protects refugees in need of resettlement Percentage of resettled refugees in the world that Canada resettles (which is dependent on actions of other countries) No target was established in 2011–2012, but performance was historically at around 10% 16%
Number of arrivals of resettled refugees 11,200–14,000 admitted, as identified in the 2011 immigration levels plan 12,946
Number of individuals granted permanent residence who were determined to be protected persons in Canada (by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada or positive pre-removal risk assessment decision) and their dependants abroad 12,000–15,000 admitted, as identified in the 2011 immigration levels plan 14,926

Explanation of actual results: For the first indicator, based on the preliminary 2011 data from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, 79,784 refugees were resettled in 2011 across the globe. Canada resettled 12,946 or 16 percent of the global number of resettled refugees.

For the second indicator, 12,946 refugees were resettled in Canada in 2011: 7,364 government-assisted refugees, and 5,582 privately sponsored refugees. Collectively, the 12,946 admissions fall within the combined planned range of 11,200–14,000.

For the third indicator, 14,926 protected persons (10,743 protected persons in Canada and 4,183 of their dependants abroad) were granted permanent residence in Canada in 2011, which is within the combined planned ranges of 12,000–15,000.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

To address the challenges faced by Canada’s asylum system, Parliament passed the Balanced Refugee Reform Act in June 2010. The Act introduced a number of improvements to the in-Canada asylum system. However, as implementation proceeded, further reforms were needed, particularly given an increase in refugee claims from countries that would not normally be considered as refugee-producing such as the European Union and the United States.

As a result, the government introduced the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act in February 2012. The measures proposed in this bill include further reforms to the asylum system, measures to address human smuggling and the authority to make it mandatory to provide biometric data when applying for a visitor visa.

CIC had already been working diligently toward implementation of the Balanced Refugee Reform Act. Much of that work will serve as a foundation for the implementation of measures introduced in the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act, including necessary rules and regulations.

To address long wait times and a growing program inventory in the Privately Sponsored Refugees (PSR) Program, the Department introduced a cap on the number of PSR applications that may be submitted by sponsorship agreement holders. This cap will not affect the total number of privately sponsored refugees that will be admitted to Canada in 2012 and beyond. The level of PSR admissions is established through the annual immigration levels plan and is not affected by the introduction of the cap. Limiting application intake does not translate into fewer admissions as the Department has a sufficient number of applications in the inventory to meet PSR levels despite the cap. Moreover, it is expected that after about three to four years, PSR backlogs will disappear from various missions. This will allow for higher levels of sponsorship and faster processing times. To reduce the backlog of pre-removal risk assessment and humanitarian and compassionate cases, CIC created three new backlog reduction offices in Vancouver, Montréal and Niagara Falls, where significant efficiencies in the triage, centralization, processing and distribution of applications throughout the national CIC network have been realized.

Finally, through the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act, the Government of Canada is targeting the lucrative business of human smuggling. The Act introduces measures that make it easier to prosecute human smugglers, impose mandatory minimum prison sentences on convicted smugglers, and hold ship owners and operators accountable for the use of their ships in human smuggling operations.

Lessons Learned for Strategic Outcome 2

CIC plans increase the number of PSRs to be resettled in a year by 1,000, which will replace an equivalent number of government-assisted refugees. Over the coming year, the Department will work with sponsors to identify populations of interest that may be referred by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees as PSRs in 2013. Increased population-specific efforts within the resettlement program, rather than the current global approach, will allow the Department and sponsors to better prepare population-specific approaches for settlement. It will also ensure that overseas processing resources can be allocated in the best manner to ensure fast processing times and reduction of application inventories.

Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society

Through the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and the Citizenship Act, as well as a broader constitutional and legislative suite that includes the Canadian Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms, the Canadian Human Rights Act, the Official Languages Act and the Employment Equity Act among others, the Government of Canada is committed to facilitating the full participation of all Canadians in the social, cultural, economic and civic spheres of Canadian society. Accordingly, the focus of this strategic outcome is on a “two-way street” approach that works with communities and Canadian institutions to assist individuals to become active, connected and productive citizens.

Working with a range of partners, including other levels of government, the voluntary sector and community partners, employers, school boards and others, CIC seeks to minimize income disparities and strengthen social integration by helping to remove barriers; enabling individuals to fully participate in the labour market; encouraging social and cultural connections among people of different backgrounds and identities; encouraging active civic participation; and inculcating a sense of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship and the value of diversity.

Benefits for Canadians

Canadians enjoy a higher quality of life when citizens and newcomers actively participate in all aspects of society; contribute to a prosperous economy; have a strong sense of civic pride and attachment; and help build culturally vibrant and harmonious communities.

Program Activity 3.1: Settlement and Integration of Newcomers

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Employment Equity Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, CIC develops policies and programs to support the settlement, resettlement, adaptation and integration of newcomers into Canadian society focused on information/orientation, language/skills, labour market access and welcoming communities. All permanent residents are eligible for settlement and integration programs. Programming is delivered by third parties (including provincial and municipal governments, school boards and post-secondary institutions, settlement service organizations and other non-governmental actors, and the private sector) across the country. However, accountability for expended funds and attaining outcomes remains with CIC.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
960.5 985.3 966.0

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
324 345 (21)

Explanation of change: Total authorities increased by $24.8 million over planned spending, due to additional funding through Supplementary Estimates for the Canada–Quebec Accord on Immigration.

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $19.3 million, due to lower than planned expenditures in the Settlement and Resettlement Assistance contribution programs and related operating costs.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs is due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012. Historical information on planned FTEs by program activity was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 RPP.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results

Newcomers contribute to the economic, social, civic and cultural life of Canada

ia) Percentage variance of labour market participation of immigrants residing in Canada less than 5 years in comparison with Canadian-born

ib) Percentage variance of labour market participation of immigrants residing in Canada 5 to 10 years in comparison with Canadian-born

ia) > -3%

ib) > -1%

ia) -1.4%

ib) -0.3%

Percentage of newcomers with language proficiency of the Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB 4 or higher)

90% of immigrants applying for citizenship will have CLB 4 or higher level

97.9%


Explanation of actual results: For the first indicator, the data indicates that newcomers continue to have very high levels of labour market participation that converges with the Canadian-born within the first few years in Canada.

For the second indicator, after three years or more in the country, the vast majority of newcomers who apply for citizenship have made use of language training and other learning opportunities in Canada to acquire the language skills they need to meet the requirements of Canadian citizenship and basic interaction in the country. Furthermore, 97.9 percent of those newcomers required to meet language requirements at the point of citizenship demonstrated CLB 4 skills or higher in 2011–2012.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

Through agreements with CIC, the provinces of British Columbia and Manitoba have been responsible for the design, delivery and management of settlement services in their respective jurisdictions, supported by federal funding through contribution agreements. However, as part of Budget 2012, the Government of Canada will be resuming its responsibility for settlement delivery in Manitoba in 2013 and in British Columbia in 2014. This will support a more coherent settlement program across Canada (outside of Quebec), while continuing to build in policy flexibility for local needs. The Canada–Quebec Accord relating to immigration also gives Quebec the responsibility for providing settlement and integration services to all immigrants in Quebec, including all refugees. Quebec receives an annual grant from the federal government to support these settlement and integration services. Currently, in all other jurisdictions, CIC manages settlement services.

This year, CIC conducted preliminary work for a formal review of the Settlement Program to strengthen the federal role within the settlement governance structure and attain the goals of consistency, effectiveness and efficiency. A multipronged approach was adopted to facilitate the gathering of the necessary evidence to refine decisions on priorities, program design and service delivery mechanisms.

Together with provinces and territories, the Department continued collaborative efforts on the joint Vision for Immigration. An action plan was created to support the vision and includes activities to improve coordination and streamlining of settlement service delivery as well as a pan-Canadian framework for settlement outcomes. The purpose is to provide a cohesive, national approach for defining and measuring settlement outcomes and to establish the evidence base for better accountability and policy decisions. As part of this work, a survey of 20,000 newcomers across Canada was developed to yield information on how well newcomers are faring across the country, as well as identify areas that have the greatest impact on overall settlement outcomes.

In addition, CIC adopted a national plans and priorities strategy for the Settlement Program. The strategy sets the stage for prioritizing settlement programming and maximizing its impact on newcomer outcomes. The strategy also supports funding for interventions that provide direct services to eligible clients and that encourage newcomers to take advantage of needs-based programming earlier in their settlement experience to foster their active participation in all aspects of Canadian life. Other activities under the strategy intend to establish a service delivery network that reduces duplication among services and jurisdictions through improved coordination and collaboration.

Another accomplishment this past year is the continuing expansion of the local partnerships model—local immigration partnerships. The model supports locally based collaboration among multiple stakeholders to address settlement issues of newcomers in their respective jurisdictions via coordinated strategies. Throughout the year, CIC engaged various provincial representatives and community stakeholders to generate interest in the model.

A major program enhancement this year was the development of a more standardized needs assessment and referral approach. Formalizing needs assessment and referral services facilitates access to and use of both CIC-funded settlement services and other community services for newcomers as early as possible. An on-line self-serve tool was also launched to further assist newcomers with settlement planning based on individual settlement needs and aspirations.

In terms of the language training component of the Settlement Program, the Department completed field-testing of the portfolio-based language assessment (PBLA). The PBLA measures student progress within CIC-funded language training programming. This past year, the PBLA was rolled out in Alberta and New Brunswick and its implementation is ongoing as a standard feature in language training classes across the country. CIC also completed two initial versions of a national test of language achievement. This work continues to inform the development and delivery of piloting strategies that will ensure that the test is delivered reliably and remains financially sustainable.

CIC also administered an outcomes survey with Enhanced Language Training clients. The survey’s methodology used clients, training and employment history to attribute outcomes to employment interventions. The Department is currently analysing the results to determine the effectiveness of the tools and methodological approach and will apply the lessons learned to the program’s evaluation approach.

As part of a broader review of settlement programming, and in response to the Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) evaluation, the Department continued to consider new approaches for the delivery of language training. CIC launched an on-line national repository of language teaching tools and resources. The site facilitates the sharing of resources among English and French second-language teachers, fosters the development of teacher communities, and provides opportunities for professional development. In addition, the Department completed the renewal of the Canadian Language Benchmarks and the Niveaux de compétence linguistique canadiens, Canada’s national standards for describing the English and French language proficiency of adult immigrants that will help support the creation of a new national test of language achievement.

CIC continued to support the 13 Francophone immigration networks within Francophone minority communities throughout the country to solidify and strengthen efforts to economically, socially and culturally integrate French-speaking immigrants. The Department also continued to pursue its commitment to foster the vitality and development of Francophone minority communities, including promotion and recruitment abroad and support for Francophone immigration networks. Key interventions for employment-related services delivered to Francophone immigrants included work placements, employment-related mentorships and networking opportunities, referral services, services meant to facilitate credential recognition, and employment counselling.

Furthermore, to ensure that citizenship ceremonies comply with the Official Languages Act to the greatest extent possible and to better promote the linguistic duality of Canada, CIC introduced positive measures across the country, like holding citizenship ceremonies in partnership with language minority groups and preparing modules in both English and French for speeches for citizenship judges promoting Canada’s linguistic duality.

The Department made significant strides with its performance measurement strategy for the Settlement Program. Efforts under this strategy include identifying appropriate indicators and related data collection methods for improving the evidence base to assess and report on client outcomes and the overall impact of the Settlement Program.

CIC also conducted a client survey to test a methodology for measuring the impact of settlement programming on newcomer outcomes. The survey and ongoing analysis supports work to identify appropriate client feedback mechanisms and data collection methods for measuring, improving and reporting on the impact of the Settlement Program.

CIC began major redevelopment of the Immigration—Contribution Accountability Measurement System (known as iCAMS) to better align with the Settlement Program and to ensure collection of relevant program information related to clients, services, outputs and immediate outcomes. Development of a robust needs assessment and referrals section was the first phase in proposed upgrades that will form the new system called the Immigration Contribution Agreement Reporting Environment (or iCARE).

Other accomplishments for the Settlement Program include the development of a best practices website to share evidence-based practices with the settlement sector and the public. Content for the Welcome to Canada publication was also updated through collaboration with other government departments and provincial counterparts.

A March 2010 audit called for a baseline of needs and demands for services, improved plans and priorities, and a performance measurement strategy to guide future program decisions. The Department addressed the audit’s major recommendations in its overall achievements in planning and governance (e.g., plans and priorities strategy, pan-Canadian framework for settlement outcomes), performance measurement (e.g., client survey pilots and the Annual Project Performance Report), and internal controls for monitoring and assessment of risks.

The Pan-Canadian Framework for the Assessment and Recognition of Foreign Qualifications facilitates the efforts of governments in the implementation of a common approach to foreign credential recognition, including timely assessment and recognition, in an effort to address barriers to foreign credential recognition for newcomers.

Following successful implementation of the foreign qualifications framework by the initial eight target regulated occupations in 2010, the next six target occupations (i.e., dentists, engineering technicians, licensed practical nurses, medical radiation technologists, physicians and teachers) have committed to implementing the framework by December 2012. CIC, through the Foreign Credentials Referral Office, HRSDC, Health Canada, and their provincial and territorial partners continued to consult with these occupations on progress of their implementation, in particular on development of occupational action plans to guide future actions and investments to address gaps along the framework pathway to labour market integration. HRSDC published the 2009–2010 framework progress report in March 2012.

The Federal Internship for Newcomers Program provides newcomers with Canadian work experience in the federal public service that aligns with their skills and experience. The program is delivered in partnership with immigrant-serving organizations that screen applicants for employment readiness. The program has been expanded from the National Capital Region to Toronto and Vancouver/Victoria, as well as to 20 participating departments and agencies where 63 interns were successfully placed and new partnerships were developed with 13 additional immigrant-serving organizations.

CIC continued to provide overseas services through the Canadian Immigrant Integration Program (CIIP) to support prospective immigrants before their arrival in Canada. Such support facilitates quicker entry into the labour market at levels commensurate with their skills and experience. Services are provided to prospective immigrants in the Federal Skilled Worker and Provincial Nominee programs, including to their spouses and working-age dependants. CIIP services are offered from four permanent locations in India, China, the Philippines and the United Kingdom. In 2011–2012 (PDF, 1.3 MB), the total number of countries served by the CIIP was expanded to a total of 25, including locations where satellite sessions were held. To date, more than 6,700 clients have participated in the program.

Together, these achievements mean greater coordination, harmonization and management of economic integration support to and settlement programming for all eligible newcomers to Canada, with engagement of Canadian citizens, for achieving welcoming communities and nationally comparable social and economic outcomes.

Program Activity 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians

The purpose of the Citizenship Program is to administer citizenship legislation and promote the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship. CIC administers the acquisition of Canadian citizenship by developing, implementing and applying legislation, regulations and policies that protect the integrity of Canadian citizenship and allow eligible applicants to be granted citizenship or be provided with a proof of citizenship. In addition, the program promotes citizenship, to both newcomers and the Canadian-born, through various events, materials and projects. Promotional activities focus on enhancing knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions and values, as well as fostering an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
42.2 53.4 49.4

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
404 566 (162)

Explanation of change: Total authorities increased by $11.2 million over planned spending, due to funds carried forward from the previous fiscal year and due to the realignment of estimated authorities under the new PAA implemented in 2011–2012.

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $4.0 million, due to unspent funding for government advertising programs and other general operating lapses.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs is due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012. Historical information on planned FTEs by program activity was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 RPP.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian citizenship is a valued status among newcomers and the Canadian-born Take-up rates of citizenship among eligible newcomers 75% or higher 85%
Sense of belonging to Canada for newcomers and the Canadian-born Over 70% (maintain the overall response to having a strong sense of belonging); and within 10% (maintain discrepancy between immigrants and Canadians-born) N/A

Explanation of actual results: For the first indicator, Canada continues to have high citizenship take-up rates in comparison with other countries. Efforts are being made to update the take-up rates more frequently to track the impact of changes to the Citizenship Program, including the implementation of the Citizenship Action Plan and citizenship modernization. [Note 16] Work is under way to determine whether administrative CIC data can be used to provide annual citizenship take-up rates of eligible newcomers accurately and reliably.

For the second indicator, no data is currently available. Given the subjective nature of the indicator, CIC is looking at alternative indicators to measure the results of this program.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The Citizenship Act was passed in 1977 and the legislative framework has not seen a comprehensive update in more than 30 years. CIC has initiated a review of the legislation and program implementation with a view to possible improvements in areas such as access, Citizenship Program integrity and fraud, and streamlining processing. Work is currently ongoing to address challenges on an operational level.

To strengthen the citizenship process and increase efficiency and transparency, CIC introduced an electronic validation portal for partners to verify citizenship status and also developed risk report cards and risk indicators for the citizenship grant and proof business lines. In addition, the Department stopped accepting incomplete citizenship applications.

In fall 2011, a Notice of Intent was published in the Canada Gazette concerning proposed amendments to the Citizenship Regulations on language requirements for citizenship. The amendments will require citizenship applicants to provide objective evidence of their language ability at the time they apply for citizenship. The proposed changes will enhance the integrity of the Citizenship Program by making language assessment more objective, while improving language outcomes for newcomers and improving processing. Prepublication in the Canada Gazette was completed in April 2012 and final publication is planned for fall 2012.

An updated version of Discover Canada, CIC’s flagship publication in helping immigrants prepare to become Canadian citizens, was issued in 2011–2012 and, to increase the study guide’s accessibility, a mobile application and an e-book were introduced. The electronic version of Discover Canada was downloaded 200,440 times in 2011–2012, a slight decrease from the previous fiscal year. There have also been over 26,000 downloads of the e-book and close to 14,000 downloads of the mobile application. The most frequently accessed format still remains the audio version, which had over 500,000 hits and/or downloads.

Several public events took place and materials and strategies developed to strengthen the value, meaning and practice of citizenship. For example, the Department introduced new citizenship ceremony program folders that include an oath brochure, bookmarks and a Minister’s message. Enhancements were made to the CIC website and social media channels were used to encourage the public to organize and host reaffirmation ceremonies in their communities.

CIC organized a number of special events to celebrate Citizenship Week last October. Enhanced citizenship ceremonies were also held, for example, on July 1, in conjunction with the royal Canadian tour of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and in February 2102 to mark the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The Department held 18 percent of its ceremonies off-site and increased partnerships with outside organizations.

Program Activity 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians

The Multiculturalism Program is the principal means of carrying out the Minister’s responsibilities under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act for promoting the full and equitable participation of individuals and communities of all origins. Grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, the private sector, provincial and municipal governments, non-federal public institutions and individuals seek to advance overarching program objectives. These objectives are to: build an integrated, cohesive society (through intercultural understanding, civic memory and pride, democratic values, and equality of opportunity); improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and actively engage in discussions on multiculturalism and diversity at the international level. Direct public outreach and promotional activities by the program primarily target young people. The program assists federal partners to meet their obligations under the Act and ensures annual reporting to Parliament on its operation. It also engages with non-federal public institutions seeking to respond to diversity. The program provides a forum for cooperation with provinces and territories and is the locus for Canada’s participation in international agreements and institutions with respect to multiculturalism, anti-racism and related issues.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
26.7 21.3 21.1

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
100 53 47

Explanation of change: Total authorities decreased by $5.4 million compared with planned spending, primarily due to contribution funding set aside to be reprofiled for next fiscal year.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs is due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012. Historical information on planned FTEs by program activity was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 RPP.

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Program participants and beneficiaries are enabled to support an integrated society Annual percentage of program participants and beneficiaries who report that they are more enabled to support an integrated society 70% >70%

Explanation of actual result: Overall results achieved go beyond the expected target of 70 percent in all data sources. Data from grants and contributions project reports and staff assessments show that 70.18 percent of respondents answered that “they are more enabled to support an integrated society.” Pilot client feedback shows that over 87 percent of project and event participants who responded to the survey answered positively to questions referring to the performance indicator. Over 82 percent of event recipients who responded to the exit survey answered to a “great extent” on questions assessing how multiculturalism projects have contributed to increasing their ability to support an integrated society.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The Multiculturalism Program is undergoing a policy review to determine how best to move the program forward. Promoting equality of opportunity and reducing socio-economic barriers will inform the approach. Through Inter-Action projects, CIC is already targeting issues related to the promotion of intercultural and interfaith understanding, increasing civic memory and pride as well as respect for core democratic values. These and future activities will help promote equal opportunity and thereby decrease barriers to society and the economy.

Within Canada’s Counter-terrorism Strategy (CCTS), CIC defined its role as a government partner in preventing radicalization to mitigate the threat of violent extremism. CIC accomplishes this by managing migration and ensuring that newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential. In particular, CIC provides grants and contributions to community projects and events to build intercultural understanding and foster citizenship, civic memory and pride, and respect for core democratic values. CIC also supports Public Safety Canada, the lead department for the CCTS, by participating in the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security and the Kanishka research project.

For the multiculturalism Call for Proposals, launched in June 2010, priority was given during 2011–2012 to project proposals that targeted youth, youth at risk, faith communities and organizations, and immigrants. Project proposals also had to align with citizenship rights and responsibilities and facilitate positive interaction among different cultural, ethnic and religious communities.

Lessons Learned for Strategic Outcome 3

In keeping with the Department’s strategic and corporate planning goals related to accountability and performance management, several strategies and tools were developed to support an outcomes-based approach to planning and reporting for the Settlement Program. CIC developed several surveys including a pilot that targeted newcomers and clients, a follow-up survey that focused on economic outcomes of those who received specified language and labour market preparation training, and a pan-Canadian survey to yield results for newcomers from across Canada. The value and effectiveness of partnerships in these endeavours contributed to the achievements this past year.

Despite the advancements in collecting program and client results, further work is needed to analyse the results, assess the effectiveness of the tools and strategies used to collect data, modify where necessary, and implement more informed results-gathering methods. These surveys helped identify key elements that CIC must improve, including obtaining clients’ consent, getting up-to-date client information, establishing a complete procurement strategy and clarifying roles of all players in the survey process. In addition, preliminary results showed the need to revisit the strategy to implement more sophisticated electronic tools.

CIC must continue to strengthen data-gathering efforts in order to continue to enhance its ability to demonstrate results of the Settlement Program.

In terms of the Multiculturalism Program, results from the evaluation suggest that the program should be more fully integrated into CIC policies and programs and that there is a need for more transparency and a timely project approval process. A more robust performance measurement strategy is also recommended. Further, the Inter-Action Call for Proposals should have a narrower focus. Management provided a response and approved an action plan to address these recommendations.

Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians

Canada welcomes thousands of permanent residents, temporary foreign workers, international students and visitors each year. CIC manages the movement of people within the context of a more responsive immigration system that benefits Canada’s economic, social and cultural development while at the same time protecting the health, safety and security of all Canadians. To manage health issues related to immigration, CIC develops and implements risk mitigation strategies in cooperation with the Public Health Agency of Canada, provinces and territories, and partner countries. Any residual public health risks regarding the transmission of infectious diseases are mitigated through medical surveillance of newly arrived permanent and temporary residents as required. To protect Canadians—and to ensure that the benefits of a more responsive immigration system are not undermined—CIC works with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) to conduct appropriate background screening of both immigrants and temporary residents and to identify applicants who could pose a security risk to the country. CIC shares information with these organizations, fostering timely and effective delivery of its program.

Internationally, migration and humanitarian issues continue to gain the attention of governments, bilateral and multilateral forums, non-governmental organizations, and academic and other research institutes. CIC plays an important role in framing and advancing international dialogues on migration and integration policy, refugee protection and governance. These dialogues explore the links between migration policy and development assistance, health, the environment, trade and the movement of human capital. CIC works to develop and implement a strategic agenda on global migration and refugee protection, and to advance Canada’s policy and program priorities.

Benefits for Canadians

Growing international migration has increased the possibility of Canadians being exposed to disease outbreaks and infectious diseases. CIC and its partners in health management work to reduce the impact of identified risks on the Canadian population.

Policies and programs that affect the international movement of people—across Canada’s borders and outside them—have a direct bearing on the safety and security of Canada and Canadians at large, whether they are at home or travelling and conducting trade abroad. Strengthening Canada’s refugee programs and demonstrating continued leadership in refugee protection, human rights and the promotion of cultural diversity through active participation in various international and regional forums and partnerships support Canada’s broader contribution to a safe and secure world. Finally, coordinated and responsible sharing of information supports a fast response to threats to the safety and security of Canadians.

Program Activity 4.1: Health Management

This program activity aims to provide effective immigration health services to manage the health aspect of migrant access and settlement to Canada, and facilitate the arrival of resettled refugees to Canada and their integration while contributing to the protection of the health and safety of all Canadians and contributing to the maintenance of sustainable Canadian health and social services.

The program activity aims to evaluate health risks related to immigration and coordinate with international and Canadian health partners to develop risk management strategies and processes to assess the health of applicants wishing to immigrate to Canada and develop pre‑departure, in-transit, and post-arrival interventions. The strategies, processes and interventions are intended to reduce the impact of identified risks on the health of Canadians and on Canada’s health and social services.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
95.4 93.2 92.3

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
57 94 (37)

Explanation of change: Total authorities decreased by $2.2 million from planned spending, primarily due to lower than estimated requirements for the Interim Federal Health program.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs is due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012. Historical information on planned FTEs by program activity was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 RPP.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Migrants who pose health risks are identified and are treated or refused entry Number of cases of active tuberculosis (TB) found during an immigration medical examination, treated and rendered inactive Not applicable. According to historical trends this is expected to be 2.1% of the immigration medical examinations conducted 0.087%
Number of cases of active TB found during an immigration medical examination overseas over total number of new active cases of TB in Canada Not applicable. According to historical trends this ratio is expected to be around 17/100 409/1,577 (or 26/100) in 2010 [Note 17]

Explanation of actual results: 435 cases of TB were treated and rendered inactive following an immigration medical assessment.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

In calendar year 2011, CIC conducted 500,911 immigration medical assessments. The assessments found 815 cases inadmissible on health grounds and 11,687 cases requiring medical surveillance. Of the latter, 6,931 notifications were sent to provincial and territorial health authorities for further action. To further protect public health of Canadians, vaccination protocols, tailored to specific refugee movements, were implemented.

CIC continued to manage the Interim Federal Health Program transition toward a new claims administration contract. The program provides temporary health-care coverage to eligible protected persons, refugee claimants and others who do not qualify for provincial or territorial health insurance plans. Transition activities with the previous contractor were completed, including the transfer of records, bank account closure and destruction of electronic records.

For the eMedical project, CIC made progress with its Australian counterpart by defining the project scope, developing the business requirements, advancing the technical design, and aligning the two countries’ respective immigration medical examinations and panel physicians as much as possible. A web-based system that will provide electronic recording and transmission of immigration medical examinations, eMedical will lead to improved client service, faster and more cost-effective processing, and improved overall program integrity.

Program Activity 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management

In accordance with the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and Regulations, this program activity aims to ensure the managed migration of people to Canada in order to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. Even as CIC facilitates the travel of bona fide permanent residents, visitors, students and temporary workers, it also deploys an array of policy interventions to manage access and entry to Canada, including visa, admissibility, information-sharing, travel document and identity management policies. Effective partnerships with public safety-related departments and organizations are an essential component of this program activity.

Under IRPA, all visitors to Canada require a Temporary Resident Visa except where an exemption has been granted under the Regulations. The Temporary Resident Visa requirement is Canada’s primary means of controlling migration and allows for the screening of individuals for health, safety and security risks before they begin travel to Canada.

CIC also aims to ensure that admissibility policy continues to provide flexibility to address compelling circumstances that warrant a foreign national’s presence in Canada, while maintaining the integrity of Canada’s immigration system. Information-sharing agreements and mechanisms support immigration management and provide security advantages.

This program activity supports CIC’s policy initiatives related to identity management and entry document requirements, including the expansion of biometrics to accurately identify foreign nationals entering Canada and the provision of a highly secure proof of status document to all permanent residents. The Permanent Resident Card also serves as a travel document and is required for all commercial travel to Canada.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
73.3 72.6 66.8

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
476 596 (120)

Explanation of change: Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $5.8 million, due to lower than projected costs for the Temporary Resident Biometrics Project and other general operating lapses.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs is due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012. Historical information on planned FTEs by program activity was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 RPP.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results

Managed migration of people to Canada facilitates the movement of low-risk, genuine travellers, while denying entry to Canada to those that pose a safety or security risk

Number of Temporary Resident Visa applications (a) processed, (b) issued and (c) refused for security reasons

Not applicable

(a) 1,089,773

(b) 866,059

(c) 61 [Note 18]

Proportion of known immigration violations by visa-exempt and non-visa-exempt country

Not applicable

The data is not available for 2011–2012. CIC will only start reporting on this indicator in 2012–2013.

Proportion of asylum claims by (a) visa-exempt country and (b) non-visa-exempt country

(a) 58–70%

(b) 30–42%

(a) 62%

(b) 38%


Explanation of actual results: For the third indicator, the proportion of claims by visa-exempt and non-visa-exempt countries are within the target ranges.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

CIC worked with its key partners on enforcement- and intelligence-related issues, namely CBSA, the RCMP, CSIS and Public Safety Canada, to improve the integrity of Canada’s immigration system. CIC and its security partners also collaborated on operational guidance and procedures to ensure that decision making related to security cases is based on sound advice and information.

CICCBSA working groups were established to develop work plans and address mutual concerns related to fraud, enforcement and intelligence. A review of the existing memorandum of understanding (MOU) annexes resulted in renegotiations of certain annexes with the goal of improving overall accountability. CIC and CBSA also established a formal process to identify joint intelligence and enforcement priorities each year. Furthermore, new guidelines regarding the processing of tips and investigating possible marriages of convenience were also established. These joint guidelines will help combat marriage fraud effectively and deter individuals who might otherwise use a marriage of convenience to circumvent Canada’s immigration laws. The Federal–Provincial–Territorial Vision Action Plan, endorsed by the federal, provincial and territorial deputy ministers in January 2012, will support coordinated efforts toward fraud prevention and improved program integrity.

CIC is engaging provinces and territories on a number of fronts to optimize the administration of the immigration system, both to improve the client experience and to strengthen program integrity. CIC is committed to working bilaterally and multilaterally with provinces and territories to improve communication on verifications for processing Provincial Nominee Program cases, to examine how to best enhance document verification processes, and to assist in expanding and enhancing provincial and territorial program integrity training programs.

CIC continued to advance implementation of the collection of biometrics for visitors requiring a visa to enter Canada. The new Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act makes it mandatory for travellers, students and workers from certain visa-required countries and territories to have their photographs and fingerprints taken as part of their temporary resident visa, study permit and work permit applications.

Regarding the Permanent Resident Card, three procedural changes were implemented this past year, including an application form “completion check” and the return of incomplete applications to clients without further processing. The application form was also made available on-line, which moves the Department one step closer to a complete downloadable kit, thereby speeding up the application process.

CIC is in the process of finalizing a network- quality assurance exercise on Family Class applications, which includes spouses, common-law partners, family relationships with humanitarian and compassionate considerations, and conjugal partners. This exercise is designed to assess the consistency of the Department’s decision-making processes and the level of documentation provided to support its decisions.

Program Activity 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

As part of its mandate, CIC aims to influence the international migration and integration policy agenda. This is done by developing and promoting, together with other public policy sectors, Canada’s position on international migration, integration and refugee protection issues, and through participation in multilateral, regional and bilateral forums.

CIC works closely with partner countries to ensure the effective administration of immigration laws through the exchange of information, including biometric data. This international migration policy development helps Canada advance its interests in the context of international migration as well as meet its international obligations and commitments.

CIC supports international engagement and partnerships through membership in the International Organization for Migration (IOM), and contribution arrangements with other international migration policy organizations.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
2.5 3.1 3.1

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
5 11 (6)

Explanation of change: Total authorities increased by $0.6 million over planned spending, due to the realignment of estimated authorities under the new PAA implemented in 2011–2012.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs is due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012. Historical information on planned FTEs by program activity was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 RPP.

Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Canadian positions on managed migration, integration and international protection are advanced in international forums Number of international initiatives that promote Canadian goals It is not possible to forecast how many times it will be necessary to develop international initiatives 13
Number of positions initiated or supported by Canada at fora such as IOM, Intergovernmental Consultation, Organization for Security and Co‑operation in Europe and Puebla, which are eventually reflected in international policy debate It is not possible to forecast how many times it will be necessary to develop positions 34
Extent of influence on the direction taken by key international organizations Medium-high Medium-high
Degree of success in promoting Canada’s interests in the negotiation of multilateral resolutions and in bilateral and regional discussions Medium-high Medium-high

Explanation of actual results: For the first indicator, the number of initiatives that promote Canadian goals changes from year to year, depending on topics that arise in international fora and with bilateral partners. This year, 13 international initiatives have promoted Canadian goals: two in bilateral relations between Canada and the United States, two at the Global Forum on Migration and Development, six in fora and discussions with the European Union, and three in fora and discussions with countries in the Americas.

For the second indicator, the number of positions initiated or supported by Canada that are eventually reflected in international policy debate changes from year to year and depends on which topics arise in international fora as well as the degree to which other countries support Canada’s position. Other countries are only likely to support Canada’s position if their legislation and migration issues are similar to Canada’s. CIC estimates 34 positions developed in the context of a number of fora/bilateral relations have eventually been reflected in international policy debate: Canada–U.S. bilateral relations (three positions); Global Forum on Migration and Development (two); Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (one); International Organization for Migration (three); intergovernmental consultations (three); Organization of American States (five); South American Conference on Migration (one); bilateral relations with Mexico (five); Regional Conference on Migration (10); and United Nations General Assembly (one).

For the third indicator, Canada is a key partner with a strong voice in many international organizations, and participates actively in related fora. Given that there are a number of other highly engaged countries involved in the same fora, CIC estimates that Canada’s level of influence on the direction taken by key international organizations is medium to high.

For the fourth indicator, CIC plays an active part in promoting Canada’s migration interests in the negotiation of multilateral resolutions in bilateral and regional discussions. Given CIC’s particular expertise in migration and understanding of other countries’ migration policies, the Department is able to engage constructively and in great detail. Furthermore, given Canada’s positive reputation in the field of migration and ability to find consensus and to work with like-minded countries, CIC has a medium to high level of success in ensuring Canada’s migration-related interests are reflected in resolutions and bilateral/regional discussions.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

As in previous years, the Department engaged its international partners on key immigration issues including visas, refugee issues and migratory patterns, both bilaterally and multilaterally through fora such as the Five Country Conference (FCC), [Note 19] the International Organization for Migration, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and the European Union.

In particular, CIC took part as Canada’s representative in the FCC Data Sharing Working Group, which seeks to promote collaboration in developing and managing an FCC data sharing information technology solution, deliver a program of FCC data sharing initiatives, and support FCC working groups with projects that include a data sharing component. The Data Sharing Working Group is making good progress on automated data sharing and the countries continue to work together to achieve an efficient, highly automated information sharing system that delivers on the key goals of security, savings and service.

The Department led and completed a project to develop a model MOU that will guide future negotiations of MOUs regarding international immigration information sharing and ensure the protection of client privacy while providing for ongoing compliance mechanisms.

CIC also represented Canada at the Global Forum on Migration and Development and actively participated in its steering committee and assessment team, as well as in various working meetings (e.g., preparatory steering committee meetings, government working groups responsible for preparing and supporting working sessions on labour mobility and development themes).

Lessons Learned for Strategic Outcome 4

To meet the objectives of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act to protect the health and safety of Canadians, CIC is working to address the 2011 report of the Office of the Auditor General on visa issuance. Furthermore, the Department is actively working to implement eMedical and the reformed Interim Federal Health Program in 2012–2013.

An independent review of the Temporary Resident Biometrics Project was undertaken at the end of the solution design phase. The reviewers concluded that the project is prepared to continue into the deployment readiness phase, and they provided a series of recommendations related to deployment approach, stakeholder readiness engagement and positioning the project to recognize success.

With regard to the Canada–U.S. Perimeter Security and Economic Competitiveness Action Plan, CIC continued to develop options to improve the establishment of visitor identities, the pre-arrival screening of visitors to North America and the management of flows of people across our borders. In doing so, CIC continued to engage with security partners to enhance the effectiveness of joint collaboration to advance these commitments.

Finally, on the international front, the opportunity to work with FCC partners as part of the Data Sharing Working Group and in the development of a model MOU contributed to the understanding of the challenges of multilateral initiatives such as working with and within multiple legislative and privacy frameworks, policy interests and priorities, and fiscal realities. Canada will continue working with its partners to ensure early and broad consultation, and, by engagement, find commonalities and efficiencies to alleviate associated resource constraints while ensuring adequate privacy protections.

Program Activity 5.1: Internal Services

CIC’s internal services are groups of activities and resources that help the Department achieve its strategic outcomes. Internal services apply across CIC and are not linked to a specific program. These services include management and oversight, communications, legal, human resources management, financial management, information management, information technology, real property, materiel, acquisition, and travel and other administrative services.

2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending
194.0 250.4 246.1

2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
1,865 1,799 66

Explanation of change: Total authorities increased by $56.4 million over planned spending. This increase includes funding to meet obligations for employee severance entitlements under collective agreements and operating funding carried forward from the previous fiscal year. Total authorities were offset by the impact of resources transferred to Shared Services Canada for the consolidation of information technology functions.

Actual spending was lower than total authorities by $4.3 million, due to refugee reform funding set aside to reprofile for future years and other general operating lapses.

The variance between planned and actual FTEs is due to realignments associated with the implementation of the new PAA in 2011–2012, net of the FTEs transferred to Shared Services Canada. Historical information on planned FTEs was not available at the time of the preparation of the 2011–2012 RPP.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

In 2011–2012, CIC continued to improve its internal services and capacity in several areas. For example, the Department developed a Web 2.0 Road Map and introduced paperless meetings for several senior-level committees to foster a collaborative and green environment. CIC also undertook activities to support the Clerk’s Public Service Renewal Action Plan, including the development of generic work descriptions for first-level decision makers and integration officers, as well as establishing a network of values and ethics champions. A new Code of Conduct was drafted to help CIC integrate values and ethics into all aspects of the Department.

To increase efficiency and effectiveness of services delivered to its clients, CIC implemented a network approach to better manage its workload and increase centralized intake and processing. The Department continued to leverage technology to develop e-tool enhancements, including front-end imaging, e-storage, electronic scheduling and global payment. Alternative solutions are also being explored to ensure consistent service delivery is provided to all clients through the CIC Call Centre.

A Program Integrity Framework was implemented to fully integrate risk management, quality assurance, and fraud deterrence and detection into CIC’s day-to-day operations. The framework balances risk mitigation with modernization of client services. Baselines were developed to measure and assess performance in key lines of business and to facilitate adjusting strategies as needed. A client satisfaction survey was also conducted. Survey results will help the Department address systemic service issues through the development of a client feedback action plan.

In regard to official languages, CIC addressed gaps identified in the 2009–2010 Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages report card for Parts IV and V of the Official Languages Act and themanagement of the Official Languages Program. To improve on the delivery of the active offer in both official languages, the Department developed various tools for managers, including a checklist and a Directive on the Linguistic Identification of Positions. Also, CIC’s senior Departmental Champion promoted the use of preferred official language in designated bilingual regions through communiqués and learning activities for all CIC employees.

For the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, CIC is a participant in and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Internal Services program activity. The Department contributes to the following target areas of Theme IV, Shrinking the Environmental Footprint—Beginning with Government:

  • greenhouse gas emissions from the federal fleet;
  • electronic waste (electronic and electrical equipment);
  • print units;
  • paper consumption;
  • green meetings; and
  • green procurement.

For additional details on CIC’s Greening Government Operations activities, please see the List of Supplementary Information Tables in Section III.

Lessons Learned for Program Activity 5.1

Involving bargaining agents at the beginning of the generic work description project is crucial to ensuring acceptance by employees at the time of implementation and will potentially minimize the number of grievances. This lesson learned will be implemented by consulting bargaining agents early in the development of the integration officer generic work description.

The Management Accountability Framework assessment determined that CIC should be more proactive in communications with employees regarding the consequences of non-observance of expected ethical behaviours and in addressing the issue of fear of reprisal. The 2012–2013 Values and Ethics High Level Action and the Values and Ethics Internal Communications Strategy will focus on actions to respond to those concerns.

Changes to Government Structure

An Order in Council (OIC) P.C. 2011-0881 established Shared Services Canada (SSC) as a department, effective August 4, 2011. Subsequent OICs P.C. 2011-0877 and P.C. 2011-1297 transferred the control and supervision of certain portions of the federal public administration related to information technology infrastructures services. The effect of this transfer on CIC is reported in the following table.

Impacts on Financial and Human Resources Resulting from the Establishment of Shared Services Canada
2011–2012 Financial Resources ($ millions)
  Planned Spending Total Authorities*
Net transfer post OIC ** to SSC 8.9*** 8.9***

* Pursuant to section 31.1 of the Financial Administration Act and OICs P.C. 2011-0881, P.C. 2011-0877 and P.C. 2011-1297, this amount was deemed to have been appropriated to SSC, which resulted in a reduction in the appropriation for CIC.

** Total authorities, as presented in the 20112012 Financial Resources table (and other relevant tables) in the Summary of Performance section, is the net of any transfers to SSC. Actual spending does not include expenditures incurred on behalf of SSC as of the OIC date.

*** Includes contribution to employee benefit plan of $0.6 million.


2011–2012 Human Resources (FTEs)
  Planned Actual
Deemed to SSC 24 24

SECTION III: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

Financial Highlights

This year CIC modified the structure of its program activities and added new activities. In addition, other significant events affected the presentation of this year’s financial information to include the withdrawal of one of the participating provinces from the Immigrant Investor Program, the Federal Skilled Workers refund initiative announced in the Budget 2012 and the creation of the new federal organization Shared Services Canada.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2012 ($ thousands)
  Change % 2011–2012 2010–2011
Total net liabilities 51% (565,263) (373,229)
Total net financial assets 68% 552,020 327,921
Departmental net debt -71% (13,243) (45,308)
Total non-financial assets -12% 158,920 181,017
Departmental net financial position 7% 145,677 135,709

The increase in net liabilities is mainly attributed to the accrued liability for the Federal Skilled Worker initiative. Applicants will be refunded for an estimated $119 million. Also, in January 2012, the Northwest Territories officially withdrew from the Immigrant Investor Program and returned $113 million to CIC. This amount will be held until such time as the funds are due to be repaid to the individual investors. Finally, there was a decrease of $34 million in employee future benefits due to the severance benefit termination and related cashouts.

The increase in net financial assets is explained by the increase in the Due from Consolidated Revenue Fund, which represents amounts the Department needs to meet its future liabilities, including liabilities related the Federal Skilled Worker initiative and the Immigrant Investor Program, as already described.

Non-financial assets decreased mainly due to the transfer of capital assets to SSC.

Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2012 ($ thousands)
  Change % 2011–2012 2010–2011
Total expenses -1% (1,819,620) (1,842,466)
Total revenues 18% 13 11
Transferred operations -35% (15,484) (23,777)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers -2% (1,835,091) (1,866,232)
Government funding and transfers -1% 1,845,059 1,855,803
Departmental net financial position—Beginning of year -7% 135,709 146,138
Departmental net financial position—End of year 7% 145,677 135,709

Total departmental expenses have decreased by $22 million or 1 percent from $1.842 billion in 2010–2011 to $1.820 billion in the current year. Transfer payments comprise the majority of this year’s expenses (52 percent, or $940 million) followed by employee costs, which include salaries and benefits (34 percent, or $610 million).

Financial Highlights—Chart

Financial Statements

The financial highlights presented in this Departmental Performance Report are intended to serve as a general overview of CIC’s net financial position and operations. CIC’s unaudited financial statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles and, therefore, are different from the information published in the Public Accounts of Canada, which are prepared on appropriation-based reporting. The complete unaudited financial statements can be found on CIC’s website.

List of Supplementary Information Tables

Electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2011 - 12 Departmental Performance Report can be found on CIC's website.

  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs;
  • Greening Government Operations;
  • Internal Audits and Evaluations;
  • Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits;
  • Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue;
  • Status Report on Major Crown/Transformational Projects;
  • Up-Front Multi-Year Funding; and
  • User Fees Reporting.

SECTION IV: OTHER ITEMS OF INTEREST

Organizational Contact Information

For any additional information, on this report or other parliamentary reports, please contact ParliamentaryReports-RapportsParlementaires@cic.gc.ca.

Metropolis

CIC continued to support the work of Metropolis, an international network for comparative research and public policy development on migration, diversity and integration in cities in Canada and around the world. In 2011–2012, Metropolis continued to disseminate research products, and organized international and national conferences as well as highly focused, policy-relevant events, presentations and seminars that brought together policy makers, academics and non-governmental sector participants to discuss emerging issues in the fields of immigration and diversity.

The five Metropolis Centres of Excellence in Canada continued to conduct research into migration and diversity and to publish an extensive series of working papers, scholarly articles and books, as well as to organize knowledge-transfer events for a policy audience.

At the end of the third phase of funding (March 31, 2012), management of the Metropolis project was successfully transitioned to Carleton University.

Research Activities

CIC’s research activities provide senior management with the necessary evidence-based analysis to support policy and program development. To this end, the Department completed the redesign of the Longitudinal Immigration Database (IMDB), which resulted in higher immigrant linkage and coverage rates, a streamlined and faster update process, and the augmentation of the IMDB content, such as new capacity to identify immigrant families and the concentration of immigrants by industry. CIC also developed a redesign strategy for a new data collection system (i.e., Immigration Contribution Agreement Reporting Environment or iCARE) for settlement programs to augment and improve the quality of available information, better support performance measurement and evaluation requirements, and reduce collection burden on service provider organizations. Other data-related advancements in 2011–2012 included securing new data sources by leveraging Statistics Canada surveys including the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies, the General Social Survey and the Labour Force Survey; redesign of the Refugee Claimant Continuum database to support Canada’s refugee reform; completion of the first phase (landings) of the Sponsorship database; and continued refinement of datasets made available on the Government of Canada’s Open Data Portal, a mechanism through which quarterly administrative reporting on immigration is carried out exclusively, and which is among the top downloads in Canada.

CIC developed knowledge frameworks in the following areas of responsibility: immigration, refugee resettlement and determination, integration, citizenship, multiculturalism, and official languages. These frameworks provide the foundation for a research and data plan by identifying research gaps, priorities and data requirements. CIC also developed a knowledge dissemination strategy and a research partnerships strategic framework to further enhance its knowledge translation and sharing activities and guide its outreach to governmental and non-governmental research partners.

Gender-based Analysis at CIC

CIC implemented its new gender-based analysis (GBA) policy throughout the Department. The new policy builds on CIC’s previous GBA Strategic Framework to ensure that the needs of diverse groups of women and men, girls and boys are considered in the development and implementation of policies and programs across CIC’s business lines. This policy commits to identifying models of good practice and, in keeping with that commitment, GBA was incorporated in files from policy development to evaluation and figured prominently in key areas of reform. For example, gender has become a key claimant characteristic to be analysed within the scope of the metrics of success for the reformed refugee system. The citizenship knowledge test results were analysed by gender to enhance CIC’s citizenship policy and program development. A gender and diversity lens was applied to CIC’s Settlement Program during the development of a data-gathering tool, which will lead to more informed reporting on results. Gender considerations were also incorporated in the development of options to revise the selection grid of the Federal Skilled Worker Program. The Metropolis Project also contributed significantly to understanding the gender dimensions of immigration, and cooperation with CIC continued throughout 2011. For more information on the Department’s GBA activities, please consult the 2011 Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration.


  • [1] The two-dimensional (2D) barcode is generated when applicants complete their form electronically. The barcode, which is printed on the last page of the application form upon completion, facilitates data entry as it contains all of the data entered by the applicant and can be scanned for direct upload. [back to note 1]
  • [2] For temporary foreign workers, the average dispersion indicates the provincial share of temporary foreign worker entries relative to the provincial share of the national working population. For foreign students, the average dispersion indicates the provincial share of foreign student entries relative to the provincial share of the national population. [back to note 2]
  • [3] The four population groups are: visible minority and foreign-born; non-visible minority and foreign-born; visible minority and Canadian-born; and non-visible minority and Canadian-born. [back to note 3]
  • [4] Benchmark for year-to-year analysis is not possible as this is the first time CIC reports on its new Program Activity Architecture. [back to note 4]
  • [5] According to K. Pendakur and R. Pendakur, forthcoming, “Colour By Numbers: Minority Earnings in Canada 1996–2006.” Journal of International Migration and Integration, using 2006 Census data. [back to note 5]
  • [6] According to Statistics Canada, 2008, General Social Survey—Social Networks, Cycle 22 , Record no. 5024. [back to note 6]
  • [7] According to the Statistics Canada, May 2011, Labour Force Survey, Record no. 3701. [back to note 7]
  • [8]Based on 2010 public opinion research, 22% of immigrants, 21% of Canadian-born, 23% of visible minorities and 21% of non-visible minorities agree that to “be a good person/citizen and practise good citizenship/values” is one of the top three responsibilities of citizenship. Moreover, 80% of immigrants, 66% of Canadian-born, 76% of visible minorities and 69% of non-visible minorities agree “Ethnic background is a defining and enriching part of the Canadian identity.” [back to note 8]
  • [9] Angus Reid, January 31, 2012, Canadians are divided on the actual effect of immigration.” [back to note 9]
  • [10] Environics, Institute for Canadian Citizenship, CBC and RBC, 2011, “What does it mean to be a citizen in Canada? Environics study measures views of native-born and foreign-born Canadians.” [back to note 10]
  • [11] The numbers appearing in this report may differ from those reported in earlier publications. These differences reflect adjustments to CIC’s administrative data files that normally occur over time. [back to note 11]
  • [12] For more information, please consult Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Facts and Figures 2011. [back to note 12]
  • [13] Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Canadian Occupational Projection System, 2011 projections. [back to note 13]
  • [14] An expression of interest model allows greater control over the type and number of skilled worker applications that are accepted and processed. Prospective immigrants fill in a form to indicate their “interest” in applying for temporary and/or permanent residence. The information collected determines whether candidates who enter the EOI pool might later be drawn and invited to apply for an immigrant visa. [back to note 14]
  • [15] To reduce the large backlog and lengthy wait times for parent and grandparent sponsorship, CIC introduced on November 5, 2011, as part of Phase I of the Action Plan for Faster Family Reunification, a temporary pause of up to 24 months on the acceptance of new sponsorship applications. [back to note 15]
  • [16] Current rates are based on Census data and available only every five years (take-up rate data based on Census 2011 to be released in 2013). [back to note 16]
  • [17] Data source: Public Health Agency Canada TB in Canada 2010 prerelease. Please note this is the most up-to-date information on TB statistics available in Canada. [back to note 17]
  • [18] Results may be an underestimate in that applications may be refused for non-security reasons at an earlier stage of the screening process. [back to note 18]
  • [19] The other Five Country Conference members are Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States. [back to note 19]
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