Details of Transfer Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Settlement Program

Start date: May 15, 2008

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Settlement Program provides services that make a difference in the lives of newcomers. These services include language training; information and referrals; assistance matching employment with newcomers’ skills and education; and help with establishing networks and contacts in their communities.

Strategic outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.

Results achieved: CIC provides funding for the delivery of settlement services across Canada and pre-arrival orientation services overseas. In 2013–2014, CIC served 259,575 clients in Canada and 17,427 clients overseas. 

The program’s ultimate outcomes are that:

  • newcomers are better able to find employment commensurate with their skills and experience;
  • newcomers enjoy their rights and act on their responsibilities in Canadian society;
  • Canadians provide a welcoming community to facilitate the participation of newcomers in Canadian society; and
  • newcomers contribute to the economic, social and cultural development needs of Canada.
Program: Settlement Program
($ millions)
Actual spending
2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
2013–14
Variance
Total grants
Total contributions 593.7 585.5 596.9 590.2 572.2 24.7
Total other types of transfer payments
Total program 593.7 585.5 596.9 590.2 572.2 24.7

Comments on variances: A reduction in the authorities through the supplementary estimates of $5.3 M was due to the repatriation of settlement services in British Columbia and Manitoba and internal reallocations of $1.4 M. In addition, the delivery of the Settlement Program depends on service provider organizations (SPOs). While plans are made to fully spend the budget and agreements are established accordingly, slippage may occur for many reasons, such as planned activities not materializing or actual eligible expenses ending up lower than planned.  

Audits completed and planned: The Audit of the Administration of the Settlement Program was published in June 2010. The Audit of the Administration of Grants & Contributions is expected to be completed in 2015–2016 and includes this transfer payment program.

  • Completed 2009–2010: Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada.
  • Completed 2010–2011: Host Program, Welcoming Communities Initiative, Immigration Settlement and Adaptation Program, Going to Canada Immigration Portal Initiative.
  • Completed 2012–2013: Overseas Orientation Initiatives, Recruitment and Integration of French-speaking Immigrants to Francophone Minority Communities Initiative.

Evaluations completed and planned:

  • Completed 2009–2010: Evaluation of Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada.
  • Completed 2010–2011: Evaluations of Host Program, Welcoming Communities Initiative, Immigration Settlement and Adaptation Program, Going to Canada Immigration Portal Initiative.
  • Completed 2012–2013: Evaluations of Overseas Orientation Initiatives and Recruitment and Integration of French-speaking Immigrants to Francophone Minority Communities Initiative.
  • Completed 2012–2013: Evaluation of the Foreign Credentials Referral Office.
  • Planned 2016–2017: Evaluation of the Settlement Program.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: CIC engages recipients through the National Settlement Council, which meets twice a year with representatives from CIC, settlement service providers, umbrella organizations, and provinces and territories. In addition, CIC also engages applicants through an open and fair call for proposals process.

Name of transfer payment program: Multiculturalism Program

Start date: 1982–83

End date: Ongoing

Description: The Multiculturalism Program promotes equal opportunity for individuals of all origins. It works to foster intercultural understanding, citizenship, civic memory and pride and respect for core democratic values grounded in our history.

The program’s objectives are to:

  • build an integrated, socially cohesive society;
  • improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and
  • engage in international discussions on multiculturalism and diversity at an international level.

Strategic outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.

Results achieved: For results achieved, see section on Engagement of applicants and recipients.

The expected results of the Multiculturalism Program are to:

  • increase the awareness of program participants regarding core democratic values and institutions, Canadian history and ethnocultural and religious diversity;
  • increase the civic memory and pride of program participants, their respect for core democratic values and their intercultural/interfaith understanding;
  • make federal and targeted public institutions aware of how to meet the needs of a diverse society;
  • ensure that federal and targeted public institutions’ programs, policies and services are responsive to the needs of a diverse society; and
  • share best practices on approaches to diversity.
Program: Multiculturalism Program
($ millions)
Actual spending
2011–12
Actual spending
2012–13
Planned spending
2013–14
Total authorities
2013–14
Actual spending
2013–14
Variances
Total grants 1.9 1.3 3.0 3.0 2.0 1.0
Total contributions 6.6 6.7 5.6 5.5 4.6 1.0
Total other types of transfer payments
Total program 8.5 8.0 8.6 8.5 6.6 2.0

Comment on variances: The $2.0 M surplus is mostly due to recipients not spending as planned.

Audits completed and planned: The Enhanced Follow-up of the Multiculturalism Program Review was completed in 2011–2012. The Audit of the Administration of Grants & Contributions is expected to be completed in 2015–2016 and includes this transfer payment program.

Evaluation completed: Completed 2011–2012: Evaluation of the Multiculturalism Program.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: CIC distributes surveys to participants attending multiculturalism projects and events to measure results. A new survey process was implemented in the summer 2013 using online survey tools accessible via a smart phone, tablet or computer to encourage immediate feedback at the events. Results for the period between August 2013 and March 2014 are based on 1,295 responses received from participants attending 42 events and three project-related activities. A preliminary analysis of responses indicates that 95% of respondents were “enabled to support an integrated society,” which exceeds the annual target of 70%.

Name of transfer payment program: Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP)

Start date: 1970s (under another name; RAP in its current form was implemented in 1998)

End date: Ongoing

Description: The purpose of RAP is to provide direct financial support and fund the provision of immediate and essential services to eligible recipients (e.g., government-assisted refugees (GARs) who lack the resources to provide for their basic needs and the needs of their dependants).

Strategic outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.

Results Achieved: The expected outcomes of RAP include meeting the immediate and essential needs of RAP clients as well as ensuring that RAP services are timely, useful and accessible; clients are linked to CIC settlement and other government services; and these newcomers have increased life skills, knowledge and the means to live safely and independently.

CIC continues to meet the immediate and essential needs of RAP clients. Additionally, these clients obtain CIC settlement and other government services they need to progress toward their settlement goals. In March 2014, CIC launched a new and improved data collection tool to gather information from RAP funding recipients. As a result, the Department has begun collecting more detailed information on client activities and service outputs, which will improve future reporting.

Program: RAP ($ millions) Actual spending 2011–12 Actual spending 2012–13 Planned spending 2013–14 Total authorities 2013–14 Actual spending 2013–14 Variance
Total grants
Total contributions 54.2 50.7 58.2 58.2 51.2 7.0
Total other types of transfer payments
Total program 54.2 50.7 58.2 58.2 51.2 7.0

Comment on variance: The GAR targets are established on an annual basis. In 2013–2014, the actual arrivals were less than the planned arrivals.

Audits completed and planned: The Audit of the Administration of the Resettlement Assistance Program was published in October 2010. The Audit of the Administration of Grants & Contributions is expected to be completed in 2015–2016 and includes this transfer payment program.

Evaluation planned: An evaluation of RAP will be completed in 2015–2016.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: CIC uses calls for proposals to award contribution agreements to service providers. Refugee recipients undergo an intake assessment upon arrival to Canada to determine the level of support they need and what types of services they require.

Name of transfer payment program: Canada–Quebec Accord Grant / Subvention versée en vertu de l’Accord Canada–Québec

Start date: Financial compensation to the province (in the form of a grant) is based on the Canada–Quebec Accord, which came into force on April 1, 1991.

End date: The Accord does not have an expiry date.

Description: The Canada–Quebec Accord relating to immigration gives Quebec the responsibility for providing reception and integration services to all immigrants in Quebec, including all refugees. Quebec receives an annual grant from the federal government to support these reception and integration services.

Objective / anticipated outcomes: An objective of the Canada–Quebec Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec’s demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants into the province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec.

Activities: Quebec is responsible for the selection of immigrants and their reception to and integration into Quebec. In accordance with Section 26 and Annex B of the Canada–Quebec Accord, Canada is required to pay compensation to Quebec for reception and integration services, where it is established that:

  • the reception and integration services (referred to in sections 24 and 25 of the Accord) offered by Quebec correspond, when considered in their entirety, with those offered by Canada in the rest of the country; and
  • those services are offered without discrimination to any permanent resident in the province, whether or not that permanent resident has been selected by Quebec.

Strategic outcome: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society.

Results achieved: The Government of Quebec is responsible for developing and publishing its own expected results related to immigration.

Program: Canada–Quebec Accord Grant ($ millions) Actual spending 2011–12 Actual spending 2012–13 Planned spending 2013–14 Total authorities 2013–14 Actual spending 2013–14 Variance
Total grants 283.1 284.5 284.5 320.0 320.0 (35.5)
Total contributions
Total other types of transfer payments
Total program 283.1 284.5 284.5 320.0 320.0 (35.5)

Comment on variance: Actual spending was higher than planned due to adjustments in the final payment. The final payment is based on a formula in the Accord.

Audit completed or planned: No audits of this accord have been conducted and none are currently planned.

Evaluation completed: Completed 2012–2013: Evaluation of the grant to Quebec.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Not applicable.

Transfer Payment Programs (TPP) Under $5 Million

Name of TPP Main objective End date TypeFootnote * Actual spending for 2013–14 Fiscal year of last completed evaluation General targeted recipient group
Annual Assessed Contribution to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (formerly the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance, and Research [ITF]) Membership in the ITF supports the multiculturalism objective of actively engaging in discussions on multiculturalism and diversity at the international level. N/A C $45,114 Planned for 2014–15 The ITF is a coalition of governmental and non-governmental organizations that promotes Holocaust remembrance both nationally and internationally. Canada became the 27th member of the ITF in 2009.
Annual Assessed Contribution to the International Organization for Migration (IOM) Membership in the IOM, which allows Canada to participate in the governance and decision-making mechanisms of the IOM. This is linked to the Department’s capacity to meet its objectives, in particular:
  • managed migration that promotes Canadian interests and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians; and
  • international recognition and acceptance of the principles of managed migration consistent with Canada’s broader foreign policy agenda.
Ongoing C $1,716,884 2010–11 IOM
Migration Policy Development Program The objectives of the program are to:
  • provide funding to organizations active in international migration policy development and research;
  • promote research and the exchange of information among states on migration issues;
  • gain access to organizations, projects and activities, and be able to influence them;
  • inform the development of Canadian policy and programs relating to international migration, including refugees, immigrants and visitors, thus maximizing the economic and social benefits of international migration; and
  • support the Department’s expected results of advancing in international forums Canadian positions on managed migration and international protection.
Ongoing G $348,707 2012–13 Multilateral forums and organizations active in international migration policy development, research and the exchange of information.
Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants (GAIM) Provide funding to trusted international, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations to help support the provision of activities and support to intercepted migrants such as basic needs, medical care and return and reintegration in the country of origin. The program also includes activities related to awareness and outreach including partnership and network development in the context of consequence management. March 31, 2015 C $3,085,575 International, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations
Institute for Canadian Citizenship (ICC) The ICC is an independent charitable organization that was established to raise awareness of and generate discussion about Canadian citizenship. It particularly focuses on grassroots organizations and encourages national dialogue on citizenship to help identify and build national networks with the aim of increasing social cohesion. March 31, 2015 G $1,058,886 Institute for Canadian Citizenship
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