User Fees Reporting

User Fees

The following tables list Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) user fees and provide information regarding the history of the fees, client service outcomes, revenue and associated costs.

Notes regarding all user fees:

  1. Both the forecasted and the actual revenues are calculated based on volume of applications processed. Forecasted volumes of applications processed are provided by CIC’s Operations Performance Measurement Branch, and actual revenue amounts are derived from CIC Form E of the Public Accounts.
  2. The 2013–2014 CIC Departmental Performance Report (DPR) User Fees table includes changes to CIC’s mandate. Among these are the integration of the Passport Program and International Experience Canada, the impact of the Employment and Social Development Canada Labour Market Opinion fees introduction, and on CIC’s costs of delivering the Temporary Foreign Workers Program. The information reflected in the User Fees table includes the financial information (revenues and costs) and the performance standard and results with respect to their distinct fees.  
  3. The full-cost methodology to produce the 2013–2014 User Fees table total cost (including other government departments) was adapted to selected fees impacted by revised fees implemented along with the injection of additional funding announced as part of the Economic Action Plan 2013. Therefore, the year-over-year analysis may not be comparable with the 2012–2013 estimated full cost as reported in the DPR 2012–2013.
  4. The full cost for 2013–2014 and the estimated full cost for planning years are based on the final unit costs from CIC and other government departments as per the 2012–2013 CIC Cost Management Model by applying the 2013–2014 and future-year volume fluctuation, where applicable, to the 2012–2013 unit costs. They represent the best-available cost data at the time of producing this table. Since the unit costs are based on 2012–2013 information, this methodology does not account for fluctuations generated by changes in application processing that may have occurred in 2013–2014.

    Other government departments included in CIC’s Cost Management Model are: Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada; Public Works and Government Services Canada; Immigration and Refugee Board; Royal Canadian Mounted Police; Department of Justice; Employment  and Social Development Canada; Canadian Security Intelligence Service; Canada Border Services Agency; and Treasury Board Secretariat.
  5. It should be noted that CIC’s service standards, with the exception of the Passport Program, were not developed relative to user fees but rather to application processing times.
  6. According to a prevailing legal opinion, where the corresponding fee introduction or most recent modification occurred prior to March 31, 2004,
    • the performance standard, if provided, may not have received parliamentary review;
    • the performance standard, if provided, may not respect all established requirements under the User Fees Act(UFA) (e.g., international comparison; independent complaint redress); and,
    • the performance result, if approved, is not legally subject to Section 5.1 of the UFA regarding fee reductions for unachieved performance.
  7. The Passport Program’s service standards relate directly to user fees. In 2010, the Program undertook to review its fee structure in accordance with the UFA. The new fee structure came into effect on July 1, 2013 (with the exception of four administrative services fees that came into force on March 31, 2014). Under the UFA, the CIC Passport Program is accountable to Parliament for its service standards and performance. If the organization misses its stated service standards by more than 10%, it will be required to reduce its fees by a percentage equivalent to the unachieved performance up to a maximum of 50%.

User fee: Right of Permanent Residence Fee

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: Financial Administration Act (FAA); Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA); and Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR)

Year last modified: 2006

Performance standards: This fee is collected for all persons who become permanent residents of Canada, except for persons who are exempted by the regulations from paying the fee (i.e., protected persons and dependent children).

Performance results: The fee is collected for 100% of applicants who do not qualify for a regulatory exemption. This fee is closely linked to the processing of permanent resident applications in Canada and overseas.

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
84,800 84,100 Costs associated with this fee are related to the overall cost of the immigration regulatory regime, estimated to exceed $84,100. 2014–15 85,500 Costs associated with this fee are related to the overall cost of the immigration regulatory regime, estimated to exceed $87,600.
2015–16 91,000
2016–17 91,000

User fee: Permanent Residence Application Fee, Permanent Resident Card (PRC) Fee, Permanent Resident Travel Document Fee, and Sponsorship Application Fee for Family Classes

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year last modified: 2002

Performance standards: Permanent Residence Application Processing: Priority is given to processing the reunification of immediate family members—spouses, partners and dependent children—and to the other lines of business for which CIC has service standards (Quebec-selected Skilled Worker (QSW), Canadian Experience Class, Provincial Nominee Program applications, as well as Federal Skilled Worker (FSW) applications received after June 26, 2010).

Service standards on applications for permanent residence are as follows:

As of April 1, 2010:

  • Immediate members of the Family Class processed overseas (spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children processed overseas): We aim to process 80% of these applications within 12 months from the time the application is received at the Case Processing Centre (CPC) in Mississauga.

As of September 30, 2011, additional service standards were implemented for other permanent resident classes, including:

  • Federal Skilled Workers: We aim to process 80% of FSW applications received after June 26, 2010, within one year from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision.
  • Provincial Nominees and QSW: We aim to process 80% of Provincial Nominee and QSW Worker applications within 11 months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision (not including the provincial processing time).
  • Canadian Experience Class: We aim to process 80% of Canadian Experience Class applications within 10 months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision.

Sponsorship application for Family Class processed abroad: There is no public commitment concerning the time taken to process the sponsorship portion of the Family Class application. However, please see above for the service standard on the end-to-end application process (which includes both the sponsorship application and the application for permanent residence) for spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children processed overseas.

Permanent resident travel documents processed overseas: Processed expeditiously.

PRCs: There are two types of clients for the PRC—new permanent residents who have never had a PRC, and existing permanent residents requesting their first PRC or renewing or replacing their current PRC. As of April 2010, PRCs for new clients are subject to a two-month processing service standard.

Permanent resident application processing:In the 2013 calendar year, CIC made final decisions on over 325,000 permanent resident applications. Broken down by class, they consisted of the following: Economic Class: 184,555; Family Class: 94,826; Humanitarian Class: 45,682.

In the 2013–2014 fiscal year, performance against service standards related to permanent residence lines of business was as follows:

  • Spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children processed overseas: In 2013–2014, 65% of spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children of overseas applications were processed within this service standard, with 80% of files being processed in 18 months.
  • FSW (received after June 26, 2010): In 2013–2014, 25% of these applications were processed within the 12-month service standard, as aging inventory continues to be processed. While adherence to the FSW service standard will improve once older inventory is cleared, there have been notable improvements in processing times with more recent applications. For instance, applications received under the eighth set of Ministerial Instructions were processed in nine months or less, accounting for 100% adherence to the 12-month service standard.
  • Provincial Nominees and QSW: In 2013–2014, 61% of Provincial Nominee and 47% of QSW applications were processed within this service standard, with 80% of applications being processed in 17 months for Provincial Nominees and 21 months for QSW.
  • Canadian Experience Class: In 2013–2014, 49% of Canadian Experience Class applications were processed within this service standard, with 80% of applications being processed in 13 months or less.

Permanent resident travel documents processed overseas: In calendar year 2013, 80% of applications were processed within 29 days.

PRCs: In 2013–2014, 43% of new PRC applications were processed within the service standard of two months, with 80% of files processed within 72 days. The 72-day period begins when the client is granted permanent residence at the port-of-entry and Canada Border Service Agency mails the Confirmation of Permanent Residence (CoPR) document to CPC-Sydney for processing; the period ends when Canada Bank Note produces the PR card. 

Performance Results: 

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
138,300 137,400 393,900 2014–15 140,900 393,900
2015–16 149,500 381,500
2016–17 149,600 381,200

User fee: Work Permit Fee (Individuals and Performing Artist Groups)

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year last modified: 2014

Performance standards: Work permits processed overseas and in Canada: As of September 30, 2011, service standards were implemented for all work permit applications:

  • Work permit applications submitted outside Canada: We aim to process 80% of work permit applications received from outside Canada (excluding live-in caregiver applications) within two months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision.
  • Work permit applications for live-in caregivers submitted from outside Canada: We aim to process 80% of live-in caregiver work permit applications received from outside Canada within one year and four months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision.
  • Work permit applications submitted in Canada (same and new employer): We aim to process 80% of work permit applications submitted in Canada for same and new employers within four months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision.
  • Off-campus work permit applications submitted in Canada: We aim to process 80% of off-campus work permit applications submitted in Canada within four months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision.

Performance results: New permits and extensions: In 2013, 169,694 new work permits were processed while 216,587 extensions were processed over the same period. CPC Vegreville prioritizes work permits for those who are changing employers, as applicants extending their permit with the same employer benefit from implied status and may continue to work until a decision is rendered on their case, with certain conditions.

Performance against the service standards that were established in September 2011 was as follows:

  • Work permit applications received from outside Canada: In 2013–2014, 78% of work permit applications received from outside Canada (excluding live-in caregiver applications) were processed within the two-month service standard.
  • Work permit applications for live-in caregivers received from outside Canada: In 2013–2014, 81% of live-in caregiver work permit applications received from outside Canada were processed within the one-year and four-month service standard.
  • Work permit applications submitted in Canada for new and same employers: In 2013–2014, 97% of work permit applications submitted in Canada for new and same employers were processed within the four-month service standard.
  • Off-campus work permit applications submitted in Canada: In 2013–2014, 100% of off-campus work permit applications submitted in Canada were processed within the four-month service standard.
2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
50,600 57,000 81,200 2014–15 53,200  86,400
2015–16 54,400  87,800
2016–17 55,600 97,500

User fee: International Experience Canada (IEC)  

Fee type: Regulatory Program Participation Fee

Fee-setting authority: Order JUS-609929 amending the Order in Council P.C. 2000-1723 of November 30, 2000, made pursuant to paragraph 19(1)(b) of the FAA

Year last modified: 2007

Performance standards: All routine IEC applications that are received at Canadian missions in participating countries are processed within eight weeks.

Performance results: A total of 94.4% of complete routine applications were processed within eight weeks from September 1 to December 31, 2013.

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
5,600 6,800 5,500 2014–15 5,400 5,500
2015–16 5,400 5,500
2016–17 5,400 5,500

Note: As of August 31, 2013, CIC is responsible for the IEC program.

User fee: Study Permit Fee

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year last modified: Various

Performance standards: Study permit applications processed overseas and in Canada: As of September 30, 2011, service standards were implemented for all study permit applications:

  • New study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada: We aim to process 80% of new study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada within four months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision.
  • New study permit applications submitted outside Canada: We aim to process 80% of new study permit applications submitted outside Canada within two months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision.

Performance results: New permits and extensions: In 2013, 159,373 new work permits and 91,135 extensions were processed. 

Results against the September 2011 service standards are as follows:

  • New study permit applications submitted outside Canada: In 2013–2014, 87% of new study permit applications submitted outside Canada were processed within the two-month service standard.
  • New study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada: In 2013–2014, 99% of new study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada were processed within the four-month service standard.
2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
31,700 33,200 39,100 2014–15 38,900 41,000
2015–16 41,300 43,000
2016–17 44,000 45,300

User fee: Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) Application Fee, Extension of Authorization to Remain in Canada as a Temporary Resident Fee and Restoration of Temporary Resident Status Fee

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year last modified: 1997 for restoration; 2014 for TRV and extension

Performance standards: A service standard was implemented in September 2011 for TRV applications submitted outside Canada:

  • New TRV applications submitted outside Canada: We aim to process 80% of new TRV applications submitted outside Canada within two weeks from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision.

Performance results: New TRV applications submitted outside Canada: Visas and visitor records. In 2013, 1,193,670 applications for a TRV were processed, while 79,993 Visitor Records were processed.  In 2013–2014, 68% of new TRV applications submitted outside Canada were processed within the two-week service standard implemented in September 2011; 80% of these applications were processed within 21 days.

Extensions of authorization to remain in Canada as a temporary resident: The Centralized Processing Region processes applications for extensions of authorizations to remain in Canada as a temporary resident. Recent processing times for Case Processing centres are updated weekly on the CIC Web site.

Restoration of temporary resident status: These applications are submitted into various processing streams, including students, workers and visitors, depending on the status that the applicant needs to regain. They are processed according to the processing times of the stream under which the individuals are applying, and thus there are no separate processing times available for these cases.

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
143,900 138,500 139,300 2014–15 155,500 158,800
2015–16 168,500 172,700
2016–17 184,100 189,500

User fee: Temporary Resident Permit (TRP) Fee

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year last modified: 1997

Performance standards: Processing of TRPs: In 2013, the 13,115 applications for a TRP were processed expeditiously. No meaningful service standard can be established because TRP cases are extremely variable in nature and complexity.

Performance results: TRPs processed overseas and in Canada: TRPs processed overseas are issued to overcome an inadmissibility identified during the processing of any type of visa application; for this reason, processing times for TRPs abroad are not available. TRPs processed in Canada are received at CPC Vegreville and may be referred to local CIC offices for processing.

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
1,800 1,700 6,500 2014–15 1,800 6,500
2015–16 1,800 6,500
2016–17 1,800 6,500

User fee: Other Immigration Services (Rehabilitation; Authorization to Return to Canada; Immigration Statistical Data; Certification and Replacement of Immigration Documents)

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year last modified: Various

Performance standards: Applications processed overseas: Authorizations to return to Canada (ARCs) are processed expeditiously. No meaningful service standard can be established because ARC cases are extremely variable in nature and complexity. The need for an ARC is usually identified during the processing of any type of visa application.

Certification and replacement of immigration documents: Clients can obtain a certified true copy or a replacement copy of most documents issued by Canadian immigration authorities that have been lost, stolen or destroyed. Requests for certified copies of expired immigration documents are sent to the Operations Support Centre via a local CIC office. Clients may also request changes to and obtain a replacement of certain current, valid immigration documents. Recent processing times are updated frequently on the CIC Web site.

Performance results: Applications processed overseas: ARCs are processed expeditiously; however, due to the variable nature and complexity of ARC cases, meaningful quantifiable performance results cannot be established.

Certification and replacement of immigration documents: Recent processing times are updated regularly on the CIC Web site.

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
1,800 1,900 13,800 2014–15 1,900 13,800
2015–16 1,900 13,800
2016–17 1,900 13,800

User fee: Right of Citizenship Fee

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: FAA; Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations

Year last modified: 2014

Performance standards: This fee is payable by persons obtaining citizenship status. This fee is linked to the acquisition of citizenship status. Persons under 18 years of age and adoptees who are under the age of 18 at the time of application do not pay the right of citizenship fee. See CIC’s fee list for additional details.

Performance results: In 2013–14, over 183,000 Citizenship grant applications were finalized; 80% grant applications were processed within 28 months during the same period as the backlog continues to be processed. 

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
14,200 14,500 Costs associated with this fee are related to the overall cost of the citizenship regulatory regime, estimated to exceed $14.5M. 2014–15 19,600 Costs associated with this fee are related to the overall cost of the citizenship regulatory regime, estimated to exceed $14.5 M.
2015–16 27,300
2016–17 23,500

User fee: Citizenship Fees: Grant, Retention, Resumption and Renunciation of Citizenship

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations

Year last modified: Various

Performance standards: Recent processing times are updated quarterly on the CIC Web site.

Performance results: In 2013–2014, over 183,000 Citizenship grant applications were finalized; 80% grant applications were processed within 28 months during the same period as aging inventory continues to be processed. 

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
23,000 25,000 120,600 2014–15 63,500 129,300
2015–16 88,300 118,800
2016–17 76,100 114,600

User fee: Citizenship Status Document Fees: Proof of Citizenship and Search for Record of Citizenship

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations

Year last modified: 1997

Performance standards: Recent processing times are updated quarterly on the CIC Web site.

Performance results: In fiscal year 2013–2014, CIC processed 51,669 citizenship proofs with a processing time of five months or less (based on 80% of applications processed).

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
4,000 4,000 20,500 2014–15 4,600 20,500
2015–16 4,000 20,500
2016–17 3,600 20,500

User fee: Biometrics Fees

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: FAA and IRPR

Year last modified: May 8, 2013

Performance standards: Partial recovery of the cost of biometrics (target is 50% of ongoing costs recovered beginning in 2015)

Performance results: In fiscal year 2013–2014, there were 75,370 Biometric enrolments.

Note: This is only partial year data as biometrics was rolled out from May–December in 2013.  Therefore, the full complement of biometric-requiring countries was online as of December 2013.

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
12,900 6,100 15,800 2014–15 24,600 30,100
2015–16 26,500 32,500
2016–17 28,800 35,300

User fee: Passport

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: FAA, User Fee Act and Passport Service Fees Regulation

Year last modified: 2013

Performance standards: Refer to the table below.

Performance results: Refer to the table below.

Note: Forecast revenues are based on CIC’s Report on Plans and Priorities 2014–2015.

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
496,500 462,500 256,500 2014–15 673,700 419,500
2015–16 654,500 418,000
2016–17 673,800 426,300
Service Services for Canadians in Canada Services for Canadians in Canada Services for Canadians in Canada
Services for Canadians in Canada
Passport application in person 10 business days 90% of complete applications are processed within announced service standards 99.79.%
Passport application by mail 20 business days 99.87%
Passport application via receiving agent 20 business days 99.89%
Urgent service Next 24 hours (business day) 99.58%
Express service 2 to 9 business days 99.95%
Pick-up service 10 business days 99.77%
Same day out of regular hours of service Same day 97.37%
Services for Canadians outside of Canada
Regular passport application 20 business days 90% of complete applications are processed within announced processing times 97.17%
Temporary passport Less than 20 business days 99.60%
Emergency travel document Less than 20 business days 98.67%
Services for non-Canadians in Canada
Certificate of identity 20 business days 90% of complete applications are processed within announced processing times 98.20%
Refugee travel document 20 business days 98.51%
Other
Addition of a special stamp

If request is made:

  • Along with a travel document application: same as processing time for the associated travel document;
  • After a travel document has been issued: 10 business days
90% of requests are processed within announced processing times 90.24%

User fee: Fees for processing access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA)

Fee type: Other products and services

Fee-setting authority: ATIA

Year last modified: 1992

Performance standards: Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to Section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension is to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request. The ATIA provides further details.

Performance results: CIC received 29,281 requests under the ATIA in 2013–2014 and completed 27,407 requests during the same period. In 86% of the completed cases, CIC responded within the legislative timeframe.

Other information: The number of ATIA requests received by the Department has increased significantly, almost tripling over the past six years. This has resulted in increased costs to process these requests. Source: Annual Report 2013–14—Privacy Act, Access to Information Act

2013–14 ($ thousands) Planning Years ($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
150 151 3,600 2014–15 151 3,900
2015–16 151 3,900
2016–17 151 3,900
User fees totals
2013–14
($ thousands)
Planning Years
($ thousands)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Forecast Revenue Estimated Full Cost
Subtotal Regulatory 1,009,100 972,700 1,092,700 2014–15 1,269,100 1,305,300
2015–16 1,314,400 1,300,600
2016–17 1,339,200 1,336,000
Subtotal Other products and services 150 151 3,600 2014–15 151 3,900
2015–16 151 3,900
2016–17 151 3,900
Total 1,009,250 972,851 1,096,300 2014–15 1,269,251 1,309,200
2015–16 1,314,551 1,304,500
2016–17 1,339,351 1,339,900

External fees

Immigration applications: Permanent Residence

External fee Service standard Performance results Stakeholder consultationFootnote i
Permanent Residence cards (PRC)
Permanent Residence cards We aim to process 80% of initial PRC applications within two months from the time the confirmation of permanent residence form is completed at a port-of-entry or at a CIC in-Canada office to a final decision. Processing times for new applications were not kept within the two-month service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 43% of PRC applications.  
Economic classes
Federal Skilled Workers (FSW) We aim to process 80% of FSW applications received after June 26, 2010 within one year from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision. Processing times for FSW applications were not kept within the one-year service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 25% of FSW applications received after June 26, 2010.  
Provincial Nominees and Quebec-selected Skilled Workers (QSW) We aim to process 80% of Provincial Nominee and QSW applications within 11 months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision. This standard does not include provincial processing times. Processing times for Provincial Nominee and QSW applications were not kept within the 11-month service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 61% of Provincial Nominee and 47% QSW applications.  
Canadian Experience Class We aim to process 80% of Canadian Experience Class applications within 10 months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision. Processing times for Canadian Experience Class applications were not kept within the 10-month service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 49% of Canadian Experience Class applications.  
Permanent Residence—Family Sponsorship
Spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children overseas We aim to process 80% of spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children overseas applications within one year from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision. Processing times for spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children overseas applications were not kept within the one-year service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 65% of spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children overseas applications.  

Immigration applications: Temporary Residence

External fee Service standard Performance results Stakeholder consultation
Temporary Residence: Work permits

Work permit: applications submitted outside Canada

All programs (excluding Live-in Caregiver Program) outside Canada

We aim to process 80% of work permit applications (excluding those from the Live-in Caregiver Program) received from outside Canada within two months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision. Processing times for work permit applications (excluding those from the Live-in Caregiver Program) received from outside Canada were not kept within the two-month service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 78% of work permit applications (excluding those from the Live-in Caregiver Program) received from outside Canada.  
Work permit: Live-in Caregiver Program applications submitted outside Canada We aim to process 80% of Live-in Caregiver work permit applications received from outside Canada within 16 months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision. Processing times for Live-in Caregiver work permit applications received from outside Canada were kept within the 16 months service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 81% of Live-in Caregiver work permit applications received from outside Canada.  

Work permit: applications submitted in Canada (new employer and same employer)

(Please note that it was impossible to report separately on same and new employer this year.)

We aim to process 80% of work permit applications submitted in Canada for a new employer within four months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision. Processing times for work permit applications submitted in Canada for new and same employers were kept within the four-month service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 97% of work permit applications submitted in Canada for new and same employers.  
We aim to process 80% of work permit applications submitted in Canada for the same employer within four months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision.  

Work permit: applications submitted in Canada

(off-campus work permit)

We aim to process 80% of off-campus work permit applications submitted in Canada within four months from the date we receive a complete application package/request to the date of the final decision. Processing times for off-campus work permit applications submitted in Canada were kept within the four-month service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 100% of off-campus work permit applications submitted in Canada.  
Temporary Residence: Study permits
Study permits: new permit submitted outside Canada We aim to process 80% of new study permit applications submitted outside Canada within two months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision. Processing times for new study permit applications submitted outside Canada were kept within the two-month service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 87% of new study permit applications submitted outside Canada.  
Study permits: new study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada We aim to process 80% of new study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada within four months from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision. Processing times for new study permit or permit extension applications submitted in Canada were kept within the four-month service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 99% of new study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada.  
Temporary Residence: TRVs
Temporary residents: new visa applications submitted outside Canada We aim to process 80% of new TRV applications submitted outside Canada within two weeks from the date we receive a complete application package or request to the date of the final decision. Processing times for new TRV applications submitted outside Canada were not kept within the two-week service standard. In 2013–14, this service standard was met for 68% of new TRV applications submitted outside Canada.  

Passport

External fee Service standard Performance results Stakeholder consultation
Passport Canada Revolving Fund

The standard turnaround times in working days are:

Offices:

  • Regular services
    • 10 days
  • Urgent services
    • Next working day
  • Express services
    • 2 to 9 days

Mail-in:

  • Regular services
    • 20 days

Receiving agent:

  • Regular services
    • 20 days
In 2013–14, 99.71% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard. In support of the fee increase in 2013–14, Passport Canada held in-depth public consultations in the spring of 2010 on the services for which it charges fees as part of the User Fees Act process. Over 7,200 responses were received through an online open-ended questionnaire on current and future services. Comments were also collected through three round tables with key Passport Canada stakeholders (i.e., consumer groups, business and trade groups, travel and tourism groups) and a letter campaign to 75 other Passport Canada stakeholders. Passport Canada also conducted public opinion research and primary market research to support its consultative process.
Fees for processing requests filed under the ATIA Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to Section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension is to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request. The ATIA provides further details. CIC received 29,281 requests under the ATIA in 2013–14 and completed 27,407 requests during the same period. In 86% of the completed cases, CIC responded within the legislative timeframe. The service standard is established by the ATIA and the Access to Information Regulations. Consultations with stakeholders were undertaken by the federal Department of Justice and the Treasury Board Secretariat for amendments in 1986 and 1992.
Date Modified: