User Fees, Regulatory Charges and External Fees

Reporting on the User Fees Act

The following tables list CIC’s user fees and provide information regarding the history of the fees, client service outcomes, revenue and associated costs. CIC’s list of fees paid by users is posted on the Department’s Web site.

Notes regarding all fees:

  1. Both the forecasted and actual revenues are calculated based on volume of applications processed. Forecasted volumes of applications processed are provided by CIC’s Operations Performance Measurement Branch, and actual revenue amounts are derived from CIC Form E (Tax revenues and Other revenues (External and Internal)) of the Public Accounts.
  2. There have been changes to certain fees which are not presented in the User Fees table: the open work permit privilege fee and employer compliance fee, which were introduced on February 21, 2015, and the Immigrant Investor Venture Capital Class, which came into force on January 28, 2015. Due to late fiscal year implementation, insufficient data is available, therefore these fees have been omitted from the table below. 
  3. The full cost for 2014–15 and the estimated full cost for planning years are based on the final unit costs from CIC and other government departments as per the 2013–14 CIC Cost Management Model. Where applicable, the following has also been taken into consideration and applied to the 2013–14 unit costs: the 2014–15 and future–year volume fluctuations, processing capacity and funding availability. These represent the best–available cost data at the time of producing this table. Since the unit costs are based on 2013–14 information, this methodology does not account for fluctuations generated by changes in business processes that may have occurred in 2014–15.
    Other government departments included in CIC’s Cost Management Model are: Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada; Public Works and Government Services Canada; Immigration and Refugee Board; Royal Canadian Mounted Police; Department of Justice; Employment and Social Development Canada; Canadian Security Intelligence Service; Canada Border Services Agency; and the Treasury Board Secretariat.
  4. It should be noted that CIC’s service standards, with the exception of the Passport Program, were not developed relative to user fees but rather to application processing times.
  5. According to prevailing legal opinion, where the corresponding fee introduction or most recent modification occurred prior to March 31, 2004:
    • the performance standard, if provided, may not have received parliamentary review;
    • the performance standard, if provided, may not respect all established requirements under the User Fees Act (UFA) (e.g., international comparison; independent complaint redress); and
    • the performance result, if approved, is not legally subject to section 5.1 of the UFA regarding fee reductions for unachieved performance.
  6. The Passport Program’s service standards relate directly to user fees. In 2010, the Program undertook to review its fee structure in accordance with the UFA. The new fee structure came into effect on July 1, 2013 (with the exception of four administrative services fees that came into force on March 31, 2014). Under the UFA, the CIC Passport Program is accountable to Parliament for its service standards and performance. If the organization misses its stated service standards by more than 10%, it will be required to reduce its fees by a percentage equivalent to the unachieved performance up to a maximum of 50%.

General and Financial Information by Fee

Fee name: Right of Permanent Residence Fee

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: Financial Administration Act (FAA); Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA); and Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR)

Year introduced: 1995

Year last amended: 2006

Performance standard: This fee is collected for all persons who become permanent residents of Canada, except for persons who are exempted by the regulations from paying the fee (i.e., protected persons and dependent children).

Performance results: The fee is collected for 100% of applicants who do not qualify for a regulatory exemption. This fee is closely linked to the processing of permanent resident applications in Canada and overseas.

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
85,500,000 82,800,000 Costs associated with this fee related to the overall costs of the immigration regulatory regime, estimated to exceed $82 800 000.
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 91,100,000 Costs associated with this fee related to the overall costs of the immigration regulatory regime, estimated to exceed $91,100,000.
2016–17 91,100,000
2017–18 91,100,000

Fee name: Permanent Residence Application Fee, Permanent Resident Card Fee, Permanent Resident Travel Document Fee, and Sponsorship Application Fee for Family Classes

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year introduced: 1986 for Permanent Residence Application Fee, 1991 for Permanent Resident Travel Document Fee, and 2002 for Permanent Resident Card and Sponsorship Fee.

Year last amended: 2002

Performance standard: Permanent Resident Cards (Phase 1): The service standard is to process 80% of initial permanent resident cards within two months (61 days).

Immediate Family Class members (spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children) processed overseas: The service standard is to process 80% of these applications within 12 months.

Federal Skilled Workers paper applications: The service standard is to process 80% of Federal Skilled Workers paper applications received between June 26, 2010 and December 31, 2014 (pre-Express Entry) within 12 months.

Provincial Nominees and Quebec Skilled Workers paper applications: The service standard is to process 80% of Provincial Nominees and Quebec Skilled Workers paper applications within 11 months.

Canadian Experience Class paper applications: The service standard is to process 80% of Canadian Experience Class paper applications received prior to January 1, 2015 (pre-Express Entry) within 10 months.

Express Entry: The service standard is to process 80% of electronically received applications (as of January 1, 2015) in the Canadian Experience Class, Federal Skilled Workers, Provincial Nominees and Federal Skilled Tradespersons programs within six months.

Note: There is insufficient data from the 2014–15 fiscal year to report against the Express Entry service standards as they did not come into effect until January 1, 2015. There will be adequate data to report against these six-month service standards in the 2015–16 DPR.

Permanent resident travel documents processed overseas: There is no current service standard; however, documents are processed expeditiously.

Family Class Sponsorship applications processed overseas: There is no current service standard concerning the time taken to process the sponsorship portion of the Family Class application. However, please see above for the service standard on the end-to-end application process (which includes both the sponsorship application and the application for permanent residence) for spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children processed overseas.

Performance results: CIC made final decisions on almost 295,000 permanent resident applications in 2014–15.Footnote 1 Broken down by class, they are: Economic Class: 182,952; Family Class: 76,151; Humanitarian Class: 35,304.

Permanent Resident Cards (Phase 1): From April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015, the two-month (61 days) service standard was met 78% of the time, with 80% of files processed in 65 days or less. This compares with a 43% adherence to the service standard over the same time period in 2013–14, with 80% of files processed within 72 days.

Spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children processed overseas: From April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015, the service standard was met 65% of the time, with 80% of files being processed in 18 months, consistent with 2013–14 processing levels.

Federal Skilled Workers (received after June 26, 2010): 64% of files were processed in 12 months or less in 2014–15, accounting for an almost 40% improvement in adherence compared to 2013–14. As older applications continue to be processed to completion, adherence to the service standard will continue to improve.

Provincial Nominees and Quebec Skilled Workers: 57% of Provincial Nominees and 42% of Quebec Skilled Workers applications were processed within this service standard in 2014–15, with 80% of applications being processed in 16 months for Provincial Nominees and 19 months for Quebec Skilled Workers.

Canadian Experience Class: 50% of Canadian Experience Class applications were processed within this service standard in 2014–15, with 80% of applications being processed in 13 months or less, consistent with 2013–14 processing levels.

Permanent Resident Travel Documents: 80% of Permanent Resident Travel Documents were processed in 22 days or less in 2014–15, representing an improvement from 29 days in 2013–14.

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
140,900,000 138,200,000 303,200,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 161,100,000 393,800,000
2016–17 150,700,000 369,500,000
2017–18 149,600,000 386,300,000

Fee name: Work Permit Fee (Individuals and Performing Artist Groups)

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year introduced: 1986

Year last amended: 2014

Performance standard: Work permit applications submitted outside Canada (excluding the Live-in Caregivers Program): The service standard is to process 80% of work permit applications received from outside Canada (excluding live-in caregivers applications) within two months.

Work permit applications for live-in caregivers submitted outside Canada: The service standard is to process 80% of live-in caregiver work permit applications received from outside Canada within 16 months.

Work permit applications submitted in Canada (same and new employer): The service standard is to process 80% of work permit applications submitted in Canada for same and new employers within four months.

Performance results: New permits and extensions: In 2014–15, a total of 155,074 new work permit applications were finalized while 246,538 extensions were processed over the same period.

  • Work permit applications received outside Canada (excluding the Live-in Caregivers Program): 87% of work permit applications received outside Canada (excluding live-in caregivers applications) were processed within the two-month service standard in 2014–15, representing a 10% improvement in adherence compared to the same time period in 2013–14.
  • Work permit applications for live-in caregivers received outside Canada: 94% of live-in caregiver work permit applications received outside Canada were processed within the 16-month service standard in 2014–15.

Work permit applications submitted in Canada for new and same employers: 97% of work permit applications submitted in Canada for new and same employers were processed within the four-month service standard in 2014–15, consistent with 2013–14 processing levels.

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
53,200,000 52,200,000 62,800,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 54,400,000 68,300,000
2016–17 55,600,000 69,200,000
2017–18 55,600,000 69,200,000

Fee name: International Experience Canada

Fee type: Regulatory Program Participation Fee

Fee-setting authority: Order JUS-609929 amending the Order in Council P.C. 2000-1723 of November 30, 2000, made pursuant to paragraph 19(1)(b) of the FAA.

Year introduced: 2000

Year last amended: 2007

Performance standard: All routine International Experience Canada applications received at Canadian missions in participating countries are processed within eight weeks.

Performance results: 95% of applications were processed within eight weeks from April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015.

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
5,400,000 5,800,000 7,500,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 9,900,000 9,900,000
2016–17 9,900,000 9,900,000
2017–18 9,900,000 9,900,000

Fee name: Study Permit Fee

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year introduced: 1991

Year last amended: 2014

Performance standard: New study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada: The service standard is to process 80% of new study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada within four months.

New study permit applications submitted outside Canada: The service standard is to process 80% of new study permit applications submitted outside Canada within two months.

Performance results: New permits and extensions: In 2014–15, a total of 176,871 new study permits and 101,933 extensions were processed. 

  • New study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada: 100% of new study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada were processed within the four-month service standard in 2014–15.
  • New study permit applications submitted outside Canada: 94% of new study permit applications submitted outside Canada were processed within the two-month service standard in 2014–15.
Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
38,900,000 43,000,000 45,100,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 44,000,000 47,900,000
2016–17 44,000,000 47,900,000
2017–18 44,000,000 47,900,000

Fee name: Temporary Resident Visa Application Fee, Extension of Authorization to Remain in Canada as a Temporary Resident Fee and Restoration of Temporary Resident Status Fee

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year introduced: 1994 for restoration; 1986 for Temporary Resident Visa and extension

Year last amended: 1997 for restoration; 2014 for Temporary Resident Visa and extension

Performance standard: New Temporary Resident Visa applications submitted outside Canada: The service standard is to process 80% of new Temporary Resident Visa applications submitted outside Canada within two weeks.

Performance results: In 2014–15, over 1.4 million applications for a Temporary Resident Visa were processed, while 141,986 Visitor Record applications were finalized.

  • 81% of new Temporary Resident Visa applications submitted outside Canada were processed within the two-week service standard from April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015, representing a 13% improvement in adherence compared to the same time period in 2013–14.

Extensions of authorization to remain in Canada as a temporary resident: The Centralized Processing Region processes applications for extensions of authorizations to remain in Canada as a temporary resident. Processing times for case processing centres are updated frequently on the CIC Web site. No meaningful service standard can be established because these cases are extremely variable in nature and complexity.

Restoration of temporary resident status: These applications are submitted to various processing streams, including students, workers and visitors, depending on the status the applicant needs to regain. They are processed according to the processing times of the stream under which the individual is applying, and thus there are no separate processing times available for these cases.

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
155,500,000 150,300,000 161,500,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 149,900,000 156,600,000
2016–17 158,000,000 163,500,000
2017–18 166,100,000 170,300,000

Fee name: Temporary Resident Permit Fee

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year introduced: 1991

Year last amended: 1997

Performance standard: No meaningful service standard can be established because Temporary Resident Permit cases are extremely variable in nature and complexity.

Performance results: In 2014–15, a total of 13,180 Temporary Resident Permit applications were processed.

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
1,800,000 1,400,000 8,100,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 1,600,000 7,900,000
2016–17 1,600,000 7,900,000
2017–18 1,600,000 7,900,000

Fee name: Other Immigration Services (Rehabilitation; Authorization to Return to Canada; Immigration Statistical Data; Certification and Replacement of Immigration Documents)

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR

Year introduced: Various: 1991 - Rehabilitation; Authorization to Return to Canada, Certification and Replacement of Immigration Documents;  1992 for Immigration Statistical Data

Year last amended: Various

Performance standard: Authorization to return to Canada: No meaningful service standard can be established because authorization to return to Canada cases are extremely variable in nature and complexity.

Certification and replacement of immigration documents: Clients can obtain a certified true copy or a replacement copy of most documents issued by Canadian immigration authorities that have been lost, stolen or destroyed. Clients may also request changes to and obtain a replacement of certain current, valid immigration documents.

Performance results: Authorizations to return to Canada are processed as expeditiously as possible; however, due to the variable nature and complexity of the cases, meaningful quantifiable performance results cannot be provided.

Certification and replacement of immigration documents: Processing times are updated regularly. For more information on processing times please see the CIC Web site.

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
1,900,000 2,000,000 12,200,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 1,900,000 7,000,000
2016–17 1,900,000 7,000,000
2017–18 1,900,000 7,000,000

Fee name: Right of Citizenship Fee

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: FAA; Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations

Year introduced: 1995

Year last amended: 1995

Performance standard: This fee is payable by persons obtaining citizenship status and is linked to the acquisition of citizenship status. Persons under 18 years of age and adoptees who are under the age of 18 at the time of application do not pay the right of citizenship fee. See CIC’s fee list for additional details.

Performance results: In 2014–15, a total of 249,300 individuals became new citizens.

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
19,600,000 23,500,000 Costs associated with this fee are related to the overall cost of the citizenship regulatory regime, estimated to exceed $23 500 000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 24,000,000 Costs associated with this fee are related to the overall cost of the citizenship regulatory regime, estimated to exceed $24 000 000
2016–17 24,000,000
2017–18 24,000,000

Fee name: Citizenship Fees: Grant, Retention, Resumption and Renunciation of Citizenship

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations

Year introduced: 1993

Year last amended: 2015 for grant and resumption; 1997 for retention; 1995 for renunciation.

Performance standard: There are no current service standards for these lines of business.

Performance results: In 2014–15, close to 281,000 decisions were rendered on citizenship grant applications, which include adult, minor, resumptions and adoptions. Combined, both routine and non-routine applications were processed in 29 months or less over the same time period. The new streamlined decision-making process and other changes to the Citizenship Act are expected to bring the processing time for new citizenship applications down to under one year, reduce the citizenship application backlog by more than 80% and work toward a manageable inventory of applications in fiscal year 2015–16.

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
63,500,000 68,000,000 165,200,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 132,900,000 144,800,000
2016–17 132,900,000 139,600,000
2017–18 132,900,000 137,600,000

Fee name: Citizenship Status Document Fees: Proof of Citizenship and Search for Record of Citizenship

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations

Year introduced: 1993

Year last amended: 1997

Performance standard: There is no current service standard for the processing of citizenship proof applications. 

Performance results: In 2014–15, CIC processed 52,077 citizenship proof applications with a processing time of seven months or less (based on 80% of applications processed).

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
4,600,000 4,000,000 19,200,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 4,000,000 19,100,000
2016–17 3,600,000 17,400,000
2017–18 3,600,000 17,400,000

Fee name: Biometrics Fees

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: FAA and IRPR

Year introduced: 2013

Year last amended: 2013

Performance standard: The fee is charged to pertinent clients for biometric enrolment; therefore, there is a partial recovery of the cost of biometrics (target is 50% of ongoing costs recovered beginning in 2015).

Performance results: There were 241,343 Biometric enrolments in 2014–15.

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
24,600,000 19,600,000 33,300,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 26,500,000 43,100,000
2016–17 28,800,000 46,800,000
2017–18 31,500,000 53,600,000

Fee name: Passport

Fee type: Regulatory

Fee-setting authority: FAA, UFA, Passport and Other Travel Document Services Fees Regulations

Year introduced: 1992

Year last amended: 2013

Performance standard: Refer to the table below.

Performance results: Refer to the table below.

Other information: The Passport Program expects to generate a surplus in revenues until 2017–18. These financial surpluses will be used to compensate the anticipated reduction in revenue during the second half of the business cycle, starting in 2018-19. The significant drop in revenues in the second half of the business cycle is caused by an abrupt reduction in passport demand due to the introduction of a 10-year validity passport in July 2013. While demand is low, the Passport Program requires accumulated surpluses to sustain operations as there are many fixed costs associated with maintaining the infrastructure that supports its delivery which do not vary with passport volume fluctuations.

Services for Canadians in Canada
Service Service standard Performance target Results for
2014–15
Passport application submitted in person at a Passport Canada-branded office 10 business days 90% of complete applications are processed within announced processing times 99.64%
Passport application submitted by mail 20 business days 99.84%
Passport application submitted in person at a receiving agent 20 business days 99.81%
Services for Canadians outside Canada
Service Service standard Performance target Results for
2014–15
Regular passport application submitted in person at a Government of Canada office abroad 20 business days 90% of complete applications are processed within announced processing times 96.39%
Temporary passport 20 business days 99.44%
Emergency travel document 20 business days 98.86%
Services for non-Canadians in Canada
Service Service standard Performance target Results for
2014–15
Certificate of identity 20 business days 90% of complete applications are processed within announced processing times 94.81%
Refugee travel document 20 business days 95.73%
Expedited services in Canada
Service Service standard Performance target Results for
2014–15
Urgent service 24 hours (next business day) 90% of complete applications are processed within announced processing times 99.40%
Express service Two to nine business days 99.94%
Pick-up service 10 business days 99.78%
Same day, out of regular hours of service Same day 97.78%
Other services
Service Service standard Performance target Results for
2014–15
Addition of a special stamp If request is made:
  • Along with a travel document application: same as processing time for the associated travel document;
  • After a travel document has been issued: 10 business days
90% of requests are processed within announced processing times 100%
Certified true copy of a travel document 10 business days 95.77%
File transfers from one regional office in Canada to another Three business days 99.02%
Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
673,700,000 645,100,000 357,800,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 639,400,000 437,200,000
2016–17 669,700,000 461,000,000
2017–18 663,000,000 466,900,000

Fee name: Fees for processing access requests filed under the Access to Information Act

Fee type: Other products and services

Fee-setting authority: Access to Information Act (ATIA)

Year introduced: 1992

Year last amended: 1992

Performance standard: Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension is to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request. The ATIA provides further details.

Performance results: CIC received 34,066 requests under the ATIA in 2014–15 and completed 33,524 requests during the same period. In 89% of the completed cases, CIC responded within the legislative time frame.

Other information: The number of ATIA requests received by the Department has increased significantly, more than doubling in the last seven years. This has resulted in increased costs to process these requests.

Source: Annual Report 2014–2015—Privacy Act, Access to Information Act

Financial Information, 2014–15 (dollars)
Forecast Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost
151,000 164,000 2,600,000
Financial Information, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2015–16 164,000 2,600,000
2016–17 164,000 2,600,000
2017–18 164,000 2,600,000

Summary of Financial Information for All User Fees and Regulatory Charges

Summary of Financial Information for All User Fees and Regulatory Charges, 2014–15 (dollars)
  Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
Regulatory subtotal 1,269,100,000 1,235,900,000 1,175,900,000
Other products and services subtotal 151,000 164,000 2,600,000
Total, all fee types 1,269,251,000 1,236,064,000 1,178,500
Summary of Financial Information for All User Fees and Regulatory Charges, 2015–16, 2016–17 and 2017–18 (dollars)
  Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
Regulatory subtotal 2015–16 1,340,700,000 1,335,600,000
2016–17 1,371,800,000 1,339,700,000
2017–18 1,374,800,000 1,374,000,000
Other products and services subtotal 2015–16 164,000 2,600,000
2016–17 164,000 2,600,000
2017–18 164,000 2,600,000
Total, all fee types 2015–16 1,340,864,000 1,338,200,000
2016–17 1,371,964,000 1,342,300,000
2017–18 1,374,964,000 1,376,600,000

Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees

Immigration applications: Permanent Residence
Fee Name Service standard Performance results
Right of Permanent Residence Fee No current service standard N/A
Permanent Resident Cards (Phase 1) 80% of applications processed within two months 78% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Federal Skilled Workers 80% of applications processed within 12 months 64% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Provincial Nominees and Quebec Skilled Workers 80% of applications processed within 11 months 57% of Provincial Nominees applications and 42% of Quebec Skilled Workers applications were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Canadian Experience Class 80% of applications processed within 10 months 50% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Immediate members of the Family Class processed overseas 80% of applications processed within 12 months 65% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Sponsorship application for Family Class processed overseas No current service standard (end-to-end processing time reported in preceding row) N/A
Permanent resident travel documents processed overseas No current service standard N/A

Stakeholder consultation 2014–15 or prior: Permanent Resident business lines

Express Entry consultations:

CIC, in partnership with provincial and territorial governments, hosted a number of sessions with stakeholders and business leaders in advance of the launch of Express Entry on January 1, 2015. No complaints were raised with respect to service standards, as the new service standard was considered a significant improvement from the previous service standards, which were considerably longer than six months.

Immigration applications: Temporary Residence
Fee Name Service standard Performance results
Work permit applications submitted outside Canada (excluding Live-in Caregiver Program) 80% of applications processed within two months 87% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Work permit applications for live-in caregivers submitted outside Canada 80% of applications processed within 16 months 94% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Work permit applications submitted in Canada (same and new employer) 80% of applications processed within four months 97% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
International Experience Class 80% of applications processed within eight weeks 95% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
New study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada 80% of applications processed within four months 100% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
New study permit applications submitted outside Canada 80% of applications processed within two months 94% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014 15.
Temporary Resident Visa applications submitted outside Canada 80% of applications processed within two weeks 81% of applications were processed within the service standard in 2014 15.
Extensions of authorizations to remain in Canada as a temporary resident No current service standard N/A
Restoration of temporary resident status No current service standard N/A
Temporary resident permit No current service standard N/A

Passport applications:

Services for Canadians in Canada
Fee Name Service standard Performance results
Passport application submitted in person at a Passport Canada-branded office 10 business days 99.64% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Passport application submitted by mail 20 business days 99.84% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Passport application submitted in person at a receiving agent 20 business days 99.81% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Services for Canadians outside Canada
Fee Name Service standard Performance results
Regular passport application submitted in person at a Government of Canada office abroad 20 business days 96.39% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Temporary passport 20 business days 99.44% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Emergency travel document 20 business days 98.86% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Services for non-Canadians in Canada
Fee Name Service standard Performance results
Certificate of identity 20 business days 94.81% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Refugee travel document 20 business days 95.73% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Expedited services in Canada
Fee Name Service standard Performance results
Urgent service 24 hours (next business day)

99.40% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.

Express service Two to nine business days 99.94% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Pick-up service 10 business days 99.78% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Same day, out of regular hours of service Same day 97.78% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Other services
Fee Name Service standard Performance results
Addition of a special stamp If request is made:
  • Along with a travel document application: same as processing time for the associated travel document; and
  • After a travel document has been issued: 10 business days

100% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.

Certified true copy of a travel document 10 business days 95.77% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
File transfers from one regional office in Canada to another Three business days 99.02% of applications submitted were processed within the service standard in 2014–15.
Stakeholder consultation 2014–15 or prior: Passport business lines

In support of the fee increase in 2013–14, Passport Canada held in-depth public consultations in the spring of 2010 on the services for which it charges fees under the User Fees Act process. Over 7,200 responses were received through an online open-ended questionnaire on current and future services. Comments were also collected through three round tables with key Passport Canada stakeholders (namely, consumer groups, business and trade groups, travel and tourism groups) and a letter campaign to 75 other Passport Canada stakeholders. Passport Canada also conducted public opinion research and primary market research to support its consultative process.

Other Citizenship and Immigration applications
Fee Name Service standard Performance results
Other immigration services (rehabilitation; authorization to return to Canada; immigration statistical data; certification and replacement of immigration documents) No current service standard N/A
Right of Citizenship Fee No current service standard N/A
Grant, Retention, Resumption and Renunciation of Citizenship No current service standard N/A
Proof of Citizenship and Search for Record of Citizenship No current service standard N/A
Biometric Fee No current service standard N/A
Stakeholder consultation for all CIC lines of business: 2014–2015 or prior

Client Feedback Mechanism:
Clients have continuous access to an online webform to submit feedback on all service-related issues including processing times, program and policy changes, complaints and compliments. The feedback is analysed and used to identify systemic service-related issues.

Client Satisfaction Survey:
CIC administers client satisfaction evaluation surveys to assess clients’ experiences and determine service-related issues. According to the 2015 survey, client satisfaction was generally positive

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