User Fees, Regulatory Charges and External Fees

Reporting on the User Fees Act

The following tables list the user fees charged by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and provide information regarding the history of the fees, client service outcomes, revenue and associated estimated costs. IRCC’s list of fees paid by users is posted on the Department’s Web site.

Notes regarding all fees:

  1. Both the forecast and actual revenues are calculated based on volume of applications processed. Forecast volumes of applications processed are obtained from IRCC’s Operations Performance Measurement Branch, and actual revenue amounts are derived from IRCC Form E (Tax revenues and Other revenues (External and Internal)) of the Public Accounts.

  2. Although the Electronic Travel Authority (eTA) was introduced on August 1, 2015 as a pilot project, the requirement came into force on March 15, 2016; however, in order to minimize any potential travel disruptions and align with feedback from the air industry and travel and tourism sectors, the Department introduced a leniency period. During this period, travellers without an eTA can board their flight as long as they have appropriate travel documents, such as a valid passport. Due to the staggered, late fiscal year implementation, insufficient cost data are available, therefore the eTA fee has been omitted from the user fees table below.

  3. The full cost for 2015-16 and the estimated full cost for planning years are based on the final unit costs from IRCC and other government departments as per IRCC’s 2014-15 Cost Management Model. Where applicable, the following has also been taken into consideration and applied to the 2014-15 unit costs: the 2015-16 and future year volume fluctuations, processing capacity and funding availability. As such, the full cost presented for 2015-16 is an estimated cost and represents the best-available cost data at the time of producing this table. Since the unit costs are based on 2014-15 information, this methodology does not account for fluctuations generated by changes in business processes that may have occurred in 2015-16.

    Other government departments included in IRCC’s Cost Management Model are: Global Affairs Canada; Public Services and Procurement Canada; the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada; the Royal Canadian Mounted Police; the Department of Justice; Employment and Social Development Canada; the Canadian Security Intelligence Service; the Canada Border Services Agency; and the Treasury Board Secretariat.

  4. It should be noted that IRCC’s service standards, with the exception of the Passport Program and the International Experience Canada Program, were not developed relative to user fees but rather to application processing times.

  5. According to prevailing legal opinion, where the corresponding fee introduction or most recent modification occurred prior to March 31, 2004:

    • the performance standard, if provided, may not have received parliamentary review;
    • the performance standard, if provided, may not respect all established requirements under the User Fees Act (UFA) (such as international comparison; independent complaint redress); and
    • the performance result, if approved, is not legally subject to section 5.1 of the UFA regarding fee reductions for unachieved performance.

    In addition, there are several fees set after March 4, 2004 which were granted an exemption from the UFA (see Part A for more information).

  6. The Passport Program and the International Experience Canada Program’s service standards relate directly to user fees and are subject to the UFA. Under the UFA, both programs are accountable to Parliament for their service standards and performance.

General and Financial Information by Fee (Part A)

Right of Permanent Residence Fee

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: Financial Administration Act (FAA), Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), Immigration and Refugee and Protection Regulations (IRPR)
Year introduced: 1995
Year last amended: 2006

Performance standard

This fee does not require a service standard to be set.

This fee is collected from all persons who become permanent residents of Canada, except for persons who are exempted by the regulations from paying the fee (protected persons and dependent children).

Performance results

The fee is collected for 100% of applicants who do not qualify for a regulatory exemption. This fee is closely linked to the processing of permanent resident applications in Canada and overseas.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
91,100,000 92,067,190 Costs associated with this fee are related to the overall cost of the immigration regulatory regime, estimated to exceed the total revenues.
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 91,053,000 Costs associated with this fee are related to the overall cost of the immigration regulatory regime, estimated to exceed the total revenues.
2017-18 91,053,000
2018-19 91,053,000

Permanent Residence Application Fee, Permanent Resident Card Fee, Permanent Resident Travel Document Fee, and Sponsorship Application Fee for Family Classes

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR
Year introduced: 1986 for Permanent Residence Application Fee; 1991 for Permanent Resident Travel Document Fee; and 2002 for Permanent Resident Card and Sponsorship Fee.
Year last amended: 2002

Performance standard

Initial permanent resident card (Phase 1): The service standard is to process 80% of initial permanent resident cards within two months (61 days).

Renewal or replacement of permanent resident card (Phase 2): There is no current service standard for permanent resident card renewals or replacements.

Permanent residence applications
Economic Class (paper applications)
Economic Class – pre-Express Entry (paper applications)

Note: Paper applications for the FSW and CEC programs were no longer accepted after the launch of the Express Entry electronic system on January 1, 2015. Existing inventories of paper applications were processed in fiscal year 2015-16.

Economic Class – Express Entry (electronic applications)
Family Class applications

Sponsorship Application for Family Classes: Currently, there is no service standard for the time taken to process the sponsorship portion of the Family Class application. However, the end-to-end service standard for immediate Family Class members living overseas (spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children) is to process 80% of cases within 12 months. This includes both the sponsorship and permanent residence application.

There is no current service standard for Family Class applications for immediate family members living in Canada (spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children).

Permanent resident travel documents: There is no current service standard, however, documents are processed expeditiously.

Performance results

IRCC made final decisions on almost 325,000 permanent resident applications in 2015-16.Footnote 1 Broken down by class, they are: Economic Class: 211,422; Family Class: 90,500; Humanitarian Class: 22,335.

Initial permanent resident card (Phase 1): The service standard of two months (61 days) was met 43% of the time, and 80% of cases were processed in 95 days or less. The new version of the permanent resident card lowered the adherence rate due to unexpected production delays and significant system upgrades. The Department has an action plan in place to improve overall performance results for 2016-17.

Permanent residence applications:
Economic Class (paper applications)
Economic Class – pre-Express Entry (paper applications)
Economic Class – Express Entry (electronic applications)
Family Class applications

Family Class applications (spouses, common-law partners, conjugal partners and dependent children living overseas): The service standard of 12 months was met 57% of the time, and 80% of files were processed in 17 months or less. Processing times increased as a higher portion of older cases were being finalized. Efforts are under way to improve Family Class processing times in 2017.

Permanent resident travel documents: 80% of permanent resident travel documents were processed in 20 days or less in 2015-16, representing an improvement from 22 days in 2014-15.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
161,100,000 141,133,506 390,995,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 143,865,000 367,238,000
2017-18 148,966,000 373,510,000
2018-19 148,966,000 373,510,000

Employer Compliance Fee, Open Work Permit Fee

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: IRPR
Year introduced: 2015
Year last amended: 2015

Performance standard

These fees do not require a service standard to be set.

The Employer Compliance Fee is paid by all employers when hiring a labour market impact assessment-exempt foreign worker for whom a work permit is issued. Some employers may be exempt from paying the Employer Compliance Fee under subsections R303.1(5) and R303.2(2).

The Open Work Permit Fee is collected for all persons holding an open work permit for the rights and privileges conferred by means of an open work permit except for persons who are exempted by the regulations from paying the fee (that is, a person who is intending to perform work under section 204 or 205, or is described in paragraph 207(b) and does not have an offer of employment).

Performance results

The fee is collected for 100% of employers who are issued a work permit and who do not qualify for a regulatory exemption.

The fee is collected for 100% of applicants who are issued an open work permit and who do not qualify for a regulatory exemption.

Other information

The Employer Compliance Fee and the Open Work Permit Fee were introduced on February 21, 2015 and were created out of the reforms to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program as part of the International Mobility Program (see June 20, 2014 news release - Government of Canada Overhauls Temporary Foreign Worker Program Ensuring Canadians are first in line for available jobs – archived). When the fee was implemented, it was expected that during the implementation phase (first two years) there would be sporadic surpluses. Therefore, as 2015-16 represents the first full fiscal year for these activities, revenues exceed costs for the International Mobility Program. IRCC anticipates costs will rise as we stabilize this new program so that revenues in future years will be closer to the overall cost of the program. IRCC will continue to closely monitoring both fees on an ongoing basis. Consequently there is no forecast revenue from the previous year’s report, and planning year forecasts are preliminary estimates and are still subject to Treasury Board approval. Additionally, although these two new fees were introduced after the UFA came into force in 2004, under s. 89.1 of IRPA, the UFA does not apply to these fees.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
  31,480,755 15,350,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 22,350,000 31,468,000
2017-18 23,020,000 36,998,000
2018-19 24,241,000 37,256,000

Work Permit Fee (Individuals and Performing Artist Groups)

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR
Year introduced: 1986
Year last amended: 2014

Performance standard

Work permit applications submitted outside Canada (excluding the Live-in Caregivers Program): The service standard is to process 80% of applications within two months (61 days).

Work permit applications for live-in caregivers submitted outside Canada: The service standard is to process 80% of applications within 16 months.

Work permit extension applications submitted in Canada (new and same employer): The service standard is to process 80% of applications within four months.

Performance results

New permits and extensions: In 2015-16, a total of 230,543 new work permit applications were finalized while 201,594 extensions were processed over the same period.

Other information

Although the Work Permit Fee was increased in 2014, under s. 89(1.2) of IRPA, the UFA does not apply to these fees.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
54,400,000 47,547,074 54,268,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 55,632,000 76,296,000
2017-18 55,632,000 76,296,000
2018-19 55,632,000 76,296,000

International Experience Canada

Fee type: Regulatory Program Participation Fee
Fee-setting authority: Order JUS-609929 amending the Order in Council P.C. 2000-1723 of November 30, 2000, made pursuant to paragraph 19(1)(b) of the FAA.
Year introduced: 2000
Year last amended: 2007

Performance standard

All completed International Experience Canada (IEC) work permit applications will be processed within eight weeks (56 days or less).

Performance results

IRCC met the service standard of 56 days or less, 84% of the time. Processing times increased in 2015-16 due to delays resulting from opening schedules and a condensed season. The program is back on track for 2016-17 and expects to meet the service standard.Footnote 2

Other information

IEC ended the fiscal year with a surplus of $0.7 million. This surplus can be attributed to a higher than expected take-up rate late in the year (in March) compared to the January-February period. While a net-vote program aims to achieve a zero balance, a surplus means that the Department did not have to pay the deficit as was the case in the previous fiscal year.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
9,900,000 10,354,812 9,647,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 9,938,000 9,938,000
2017-18 9,938,000 9,938,000
2018-19 9,938,000 9,938,000

Study Permit Fee

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR
Year introduced: 1991
Year last amended: 2014

Performance standard

New study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada: The service standard is to process 80% of applications within four months.

New study permit applications submitted outside Canada: The service standard is to process 80% of applications within two months.

Performance results

New study permits and extensions: In 2015-16, a total of 190,183 new study permits and 124,071 extensions were processed.

Other information

Although the Study Permit Fee was increased in 2014, under s. 89(1.2) of IRPA, the UFA does not apply to these fees.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
44,000,000 46,280,300 46,944,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 43,964,000 45,276,000
2017-18 43,964,000 45,276,000
2018-19 43,964,000 45,276,000

Temporary Resident Visa Application Fee, Extension of Authorization to Remain in Canada as a Temporary Resident Fee and Restoration of Temporary Resident Status Fee

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR
Year introduced: 1994 for restoration; 1986 for temporary resident visa and extension
Year last amended: 1997 for restoration; 2014 for temporary resident visa and extension

Performance standard

New temporary resident visa applications submitted outside Canada: The service standard is to process 80% of applications within two weeks.

Extension of authorization to remain in Canada as a temporary resident: No meaningful service standard can be established as these cases are extremely variable in nature and complexity.

Restoration of temporary resident status: These applications are submitted to various processing streams, including students, workers and visitors, depending on the status the applicant needs to regain. They are processed according to the processing times of the stream under which the individual is applying, and thus there are no separate processing times available for these cases.

Performance results

In 2015-16, over 1.5 million applications for a temporary resident visa were processed, while 142,132 visitor record applications were finalized.

Extension of authorization to remain in Canada as a temporary resident: Processing times are updated frequently on IRCC’s Web site.

Other information

Although the Temporary Resident Visa Application Fee and Extension of Authorization to Remain in Canada Fee were increased in 2014, under s. 89(1.2) of IRPA, the UFA does not apply to these fees.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
149,900,000 162,406,890 170,921,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 158,965,000 161,032,000
2017-18 167,157,000 167,708,000
2018-19 167,404,000 167,708,000

Temporary Resident Permit Fee

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR
Year introduced: 1991
Year last amended: 1997

Performance standard

No meaningful service standard can be established because temporary resident permit cases are extremely variable in nature and complexity.

Performance results

In 2015-16, a total of 11,951 temporary resident permit applications were processed.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
1,600,000 1,493,307 7,522,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 1,577,000 7,522,000
2017-18 1,588,000 7,522,000
2018-19 1,620,000 7,522,000

Other Immigration Services (Rehabilitation; Authorization to Return to Canada; Immigration Statistical Data; Certification and Replacement of Immigration Documents)

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: IRPA and IRPR
Year introduced: Various: 1991 for Rehabilitation, Authorization to Return to Canada; 1994 for Certification and Replacement of Immigration Documents; 1992 for Immigration Statistical Data
Year last amended: Various: 1997 for Rehabilitation, Authorization to Return to Canada; 1994 for Certification and Replacement of Immigration Document; 2002 for Immigration Statistical Information

Performance standard

Rehabilitation and immigration statistical data: There are no service standards associated with these fees.

Authorization to return to Canada: No meaningful service standard can be established because authorization to return to Canada cases are extremely variable in nature and complexity.

Certification and replacement of immigration documents: Clients can obtain a certified true copy or a replacement copy of most documents issued by Canadian immigration authorities that have been lost, stolen or destroyed. Clients may also request changes to and obtain a replacement of certain current, valid immigration documents.

Performance results

Authorizations to return to Canada are processed as expeditiously as possible; however, due to the variable nature and complexity of the cases, meaningful quantifiable performance results cannot be provided.

Certification and replacement of immigration documents: Processing times are updated frequently on IRCC’s Web site.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
1,900,000 1,815,775 11,923,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 1,802,000 8,442,000
2017-18 1,802,000 8,442,000
2018-19 1,802,000 8,442,000

Right of Citizenship Fee

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: FAA; Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations
Year introduced: 1995
Year last amended: 1995

Performance standard

This fee does not require a service standard to be set.

This fee is payable by persons obtaining citizenship status and is linked to the acquisition of citizenship status. Persons under 18 years of age and adoptees who are under the age of 18 at the time of application do not pay the Right of Citizenship Fee. See IRCC’s fee list for additional details.

Performance results

In 2015-16, a total of 252,602 individuals became new citizens.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
24,000,000 20,589,830 Costs associated with this fee are related to the overall cost of the citizenship regulatory regime, estimated to exceed the total revenues.
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 23,514,000 Costs associated with this fee are related to the overall cost of the citizenship regulatory regime, estimated to exceed the total revenues.
2017-18 23,514,000
2018-19 23,514,000

Citizenship Fees: Grant, Retention, Resumption and Renunciation of Citizenship

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations
Year introduced: 1993
Year last amended: 2015 for grant and resumption; 1997 for retention; 1995 for renunciation

Performance standard

Citizenship grant applications for adults and minors: The service standard is to process 80% of completed applications within 12 months. As this service standard was implemented in November 2015 for applications received on or before April 1, 2015, performance results will not be measured until the end of fiscal year 2016-17.

There are no service standards for citizenship retention, resumption and renunciation as these cases are extremely variable in nature and complexity.

Performance results

In 2015-16, 253,187 decisions were rendered on citizenship grant applications, which include adult, minor, resumptions and adoptions.

Citizenship grant, resumption and renunciation: Processing times are updated frequently on IRCC’s Web site. Performance results for citizenship grants (adults and minors) will be available in fiscal year 2016-17.

Other information

Although the Grant and Resumption of Citizenship Fees were increased in 2015, they received an exemption from the UFA.

The outcome of the new residency requirements put in place in 2015 resulted in a significant reduction in applications received. This had a direct impact on actual revenue for fiscal year 2015-16. These new requirements were not implemented when the forecast revenue was established.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
132,900,000 47,013,813 127,315,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 94,153,000 165,718,000
2017-18 130,229,000 165,718,000
2018-19 130,229,000 165,718,000

Citizenship Status Document Fees: Proof of Citizenship and Search for Record of Citizenship

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: Citizenship Act and Citizenship Regulations
Year introduced: 1993
Year last amended: 1997

Performance standard

There is no current service standard for the processing of citizenship proof applications and searches for record of citizenship.

Performance results

In 2015-16, IRCC processed 61,254 citizenship proof applications with a processing time of five months or less (based on 80% of applications processed).

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
4,000,000 4,452,373 18,595,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 3,600,000 15,702,000
2017-18 3,600,000 15,702,000
2018-19 3,600,000 15,702,000

Biometric Fee

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: FAA and IRPR
Year introduced: 2013
Year last amended: 2013

Performance standard

The fee is charged to pertinent clients for biometric enrolment; therefore, there is a partial recovery of the cost of biometrics (target is 50% of ongoing costs recovered beginning in 2015). As this fee is tied to other services, it does not have a stand-alone service standard.

Performance results

There were 300,303 biometric enrolments in 2015-16.

Other information

Although the Biometric Fee was set in 2013, under s. 89(3) of IRPA, the UFA does not apply to this fee.

Full cost for 2015-16 and estimated full costs for 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 include amortization of project costs as the $85 biometric fee was set with the intention of achieving full cost recovery with respect to investments in the biometric screening program.

The large increase in forecast revenue in 2018-19 is due to the expansion of the biometric screening program to work permits, study permits and permanent residents as previously announced (see June 4, 2015 news release - New resources to expand biometric screening measures to better protect our borders).

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
26,500,000 21,872,375 60,621,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 28,797,000 64,045,000
2017-18 32,851,000 72,835,000
2018-19 138,403,000 138,788,000

Passport

Fee type: Regulatory
Fee-setting authority: FAA, UFA, Passport and Other Travel Document Services Fees Regulations
Year introduced: 1992
Year last amended: 2013

Performance standard

Refer to the table below

Performance results

Refer to the table below

Other information

The Passport Program expects to generate a surplus in revenues until 2017-18. These financial surpluses will be used to compensate for the anticipated reduction in revenues during the second half of the business cycle, starting in 2018-19. The significant drop in revenues in the second half of the business cycle is caused by an abrupt reduction in passport demand due to the introduction of a 10-year validity passport in July 2013. By introducing a 10-year ePassport, the program had to transition from a 5-year to a 10-year business cycle, meaning its costs and revenues must balance out over the 10-year business cycle. While demand is low, the Passport Program requires accumulated surpluses to sustain operations as there are many fixed costs associated with maintaining the infrastructure that supports Passport Program delivery, and these costs do not vary with passport volume fluctuations. Although it is expected the Passport Program will operate in a deficit for five years, from 2018-19 to 2022-23, enough revenue will be collected in the preceding five years to compensate for the deficit.

Service Service standard Performance target Results for 2015-16
Services for Canadians in Canada
Passport application submitted in person at a Passport Canada-branded office 10 business days 90% of complete applications are processed within announced processing times 99.79%
Passport application submitted by mail 20 business days 99.65%
Passport application submitted in person at a receiving agent 20 business days 99.87%
Services for Canadians outside Canada
Regular passport application submitted in person at a Government of Canada office abroad 20 business days 90% of complete applications are processed within announced processing times 93.22%
Temporary passport 20 business days 99.35%
Emergency travel document 20 business days 99.07%
Services for non-Canadians in Canada
Certificate of identity 20 business days 90% of complete applications are processed within announced processing times 94.82%
Refugee travel document 20 business days 93.53%
Expedited services in Canada
Urgent service 24 hours (next business day) 90% of complete applications are processed within announced processing times 99.52%
Express service Two to nine business days 99.95%
Pick-up service 10 business days 99.81%
Same day, outside regular hours of service Same day 98.41%
Other services
Addition of a special stamp If request is made:
  • Along with a travel document application: same as processing time for the associated travel document;
  • After a travel document has been issued: 10 business days.
90% of requests are processed within announced processing times 100%
Certified true copy of a travel document 10 business days 97.81%
File transfers from one regional office in Canada to another Three business days 99.04%
Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
639,400,000 610,459,471 358,054,000
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 666,218,000 482,010,000
2017-18 662,106,000 490,632,000
2018-19 208,078,000 421,775,000

Fees for processing access requests filed under the Access to Information Act

Fee type: Other products and services
Fee-setting authority: Access to Information Act (ATIA)
Year introduced: 1992
Year last amended: 1992

Performance standard

Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension is to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request. The ATIA provides further details.

Performance results

IRCC received 41,660 requests under the ATIA in 2015-16 and completed 40,107 in that period. In 89% of all the completed cases, IRCC responded within the legislative time frame.

Other information

The number of access to information requests received by the Department has increased by 22% from 2014-15. This has resulted in increased costs to process these requests. Source: Annual Report 2015-2016 Privacy Act, Access to Information Act.

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
164,000 199,720 2,831,095
Financial Information, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2016-17 240,000 3,397,000
2017-18 288,000 4,077,000
2018-19 346,000 4,892,000

Summary of Financial Information for All User Fees and Regulatory Charges (Part B)

Summary of Financial Information for All User Fees and Regulatory Charges, 2015-16 (dollars)

Financial Information, 2015-16 (dollars)
  Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
Regulatory subtotal 1,340,700,000 1,238,967,471 1,272,155,000
Other products and services subtotal 164,000 199,720 2,831,095
Total, all fee types 1,340,864,000 1,239,167,191 1,274,986,095
Summary of Financial Information for All User Fees and Regulatory Charges, 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (dollars)
  Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
Regulatory subtotal 2016-17 1,345,408,000 1,434,687,000
2017-18 1,395,420,000 1,470,577,000
2018-19 1,048,444,000 1,467,931,000
Other products and services subtotal 2016-17 240,000 3,397,000
2017-18 288,000 4,077,000
2018-19 346,000 4,892,000
Total, all fee types 2016-17 1,345,648,000 1,438,084,000
2017-18 1,395,708,000 1,474,654,000
2018-19 1,048,790,000 1,472,823,000

Reporting on the Policy on Service Standards for External Fees

General information by fee

Fee name Service standard Performance result
Right of Permanent Residence Fee No current service standard N/A
Permanent Resident Cards (Phase 1) 80% of applications processed within two months 43% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Federal Skilled Workers (paper applications – pre-Express Entry) 80% of applications processed within 12 months 58% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Federal Skilled Workers (electronic applications - Express Entry) 80% of applications processed within six months 97% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Provincial Nominees (paper applications) 80% of applications processed within 11 months 42% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Provincial Nominees (electronic applications – Express Entry) 80% of applications processed within six months 100% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Quebec Skilled Workers 80% of applications processed within 11 months 52% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Canadian Experience Class (paper applications – pre-Express Entry) 80% of applications processed within 10 months One percent of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Canadian Experience Class (electronic applications – Express Entry) 80% of applications processed within six months 97% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Federal Skilled Tradespersons (electronic applications – Express Entry) 80% of applications processed within six months 97% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Immediate members of Family Class applications (members living overseas) 80% of applications processed within 12 months 57% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Sponsorship application for Family Class processed overseas No current service standard (end-to-end processing time reported in preceding row) N/A
Permanent Resident Travel Documents processed overseas No current service standard N/A
Employer Compliance Fee No current service standard N/A
Open Work Permit Fee No current service standard N/A
Work permit applications submitted outside Canada (excluding the Live-in Caregivers Program) 80% of applications processed within two months 92% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Work permit applications for live-in caregivers submitted outside Canada 80% of applications processed within 16 months 94% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Work permit applications submitted in Canada (new and same employer) 80% of applications processed within four months 85% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
International Experience Canada – work permit applications All work permit applications processed within eight weeks 84% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
New study permit and permit extension applications submitted in Canada 80% of applications processed within four months 95% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
New study permit applications submitted outside Canada 80% of applications processed within two months 92% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Temporary resident visa applications submitted outside Canada 80% of applications processed within two weeks 76% of applications were processed within the service standard for 2015-16.
Extensions of authorizations to remain in Canada as a temporary resident No current service standard N/A
Restoration of temporary resident status No current service standard N/A
Temporary resident permit No current service standard N/A
Other immigration services (rehabilitation; authorization to return to Canada; immigration statistical data; certification and replacement of immigration documents) No current service standard N/A
Right of Citizenship Fee No current service standard N/A
Citizenship Grant (adults and minors) 80% of applications processed within 12 months Performance results not available until 2016-17.
Citizenship Retention, Resumption and Renunciation No current service standard N/A
Proof of Citizenship and Search for Record of Citizenship No current service standard N/A
Biometric Fee No current service standard N/A
Stakeholder consultation 2015-16 or prior fiscal years
For all IRCC immigration and citizenship lines of business

Client Feedback Mechanism:
Clients have continuous access to an online web form to submit feedback on all service-related issues including processing times, program and policy changes, complaints and compliments. The feedback is analyzed and used to identify systemic service-related issues.

Client Satisfaction Survey (immigration and citizenship):
IRCC administers immigration and citizenship client satisfaction surveys to assess clients’ experiences and determine service-related issues. According to the 2016 survey (for immigration and citizenship clients served in 2015), 85% of clients were generally satisfied with the service they received.

For Permanent Resident business lines

Express Entry consultations:
IRCC, in partnership with provincial and territorial governments, hosted a number of sessions with stakeholders and business leaders in advance of the launch of Express Entry on January 1, 2015. No complaints were raised with respect to service standards, as the new service standard was considered a significant improvement from the previous service standards, which were considerably longer than six months.

Passport: Services for Canadians in Canada
Fee name Service standard Performance result
Passport application submitted in person at a Passport Canada-branded office 10 business days 99.79%
Passport application submitted by mail 20 business days 99.65%
Passport application submitted in person at a receiving agent 20 business days 99.87%
Passport: Services for Canadians outside Canada
Fee name Service standard Performance result
Regular passport application submitted in person at a Government of Canada office abroad 20 business days 93.22%
Temporary passport 20 business days 99.35%
Emergency travel document 20 business days 99.07%
Passport: Services for non-Canadians in Canada
Fee name Service standard Performance result
Certificate of identity 20 business days 94.82%
Refugee travel document 20 business days 93.53%
Passport: Expedited services in Canada
Fee name Service standard Performance result
Urgent service 24 hours (next business day) 99.52%
Express service Two to nine business days 99.95%
Pick-up service 10 business days 99.81%
Same day, outside regular hours of service Same day 98.41%
Passport: Other services
Fee name Service standard Performance result
Addition of a special stamp If request is made:
  • Along with a travel document application: same as processing time for the associated travel document;
  • After a travel document has been issued: 10 business days.
100%
Certified true copy of a travel document 10 business days 97.81%
File transfers from one regional office in Canada to another Three business days 99.04%
Stakeholder consultation 2015-16 or prior fiscal years

In support of the fee increase in 2013-14, Passport Canada held in-depth public consultations in the spring of 2010 on the services for which it charges fees under the User Fees Act process. Over 7,200 responses were received through an online open-ended questionnaire on current and future services. Comments were also collected through three round tables with key Passport Canada stakeholders (namely, consumer groups, business and trade groups, travel and tourism groups) and a letter campaign to 75 other Passport Canada stakeholders. Passport Canada also conducted public opinion research and primary market research to support its consultative process.

Fees for processing access requests filed under the Access to Information Act
Fee name Service standard Performance result
Processing access requests under the ATIA Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension is to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request. The ATIA provides further details. IRCC received 41,660 requests under the ATIA in 2015-16 and completed 40,107 in that period. In 89% of all the completed cases, IRCC responded within the legislative time frame.
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