Supporting information on Lower-Level Programs

Erratum

The 2015-2016 IRCC Departmental Performance Report was tabled in Parliament on November 21, 2016, and the Lower-Level Program table was published simultaneously on the IRCC Web Site. Subsequent to this, an error was detected in the financial information presented in the actuals reported in the on-line Lower-Level Program table for Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.1, Language Training and Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.2, Community and Labour Market Integration Services. Financial information was inverted between the two sub-sub-programs and the information has now been corrected; this error does not impact the integrity of the financial information presented for Sub-Program 3.1.1, Settlement, nor the financial information presented for Program 3.1, Newcomer Settlement and Integration.

Table of Contents

IRCC Sub-Program Information

Program 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), the focus of this program is on the selection and processing of immigrants who can support the development of a strong and prosperous Canada, in which the benefits of immigration are shared across all regions of Canada. The acceptance of qualified permanent residents helps the government meet its economic objectives, such as building a skilled work force, addressing immediate and longer-term labour market needs, and supporting national and regional labour force growth. The selection and processing of applications involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

The following sub-programs support the Permanent Economic Residents Program.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers

The Federal Skilled Workers (FSW) Program is the Government of Canada's main selection system for skilled immigration. The goal of the program is to select highly skilled immigrants whose high human capital enables them to contribute to Canada's long-term national and structural labour market needs, in support of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy. The program uses a points system to identify prospective immigrants with the ability to establish economically in Canada, based on their human capital (education, skilled work experience, language skills, etc.), with a minimum language threshold and a third-party foreign educational credential assessment prior to application. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEsFootnote 1 181 199 18
Spending 52,124,912 21,342,305 -30,782,607

The above variance in spending is due primarily to less-than-projected fee returns from the cancellation of applications.

Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
FSWs with high human capital adapt to the long-term needs of the Canadian economy and labour market 1. FSW principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing + 15% + 16.1%
2. Percentage of FSW principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing ≥ 35% 46.7%
3. Rate of social assistance for FSW principal applicants, five years after landing ≤ 5% 3.8%

Performance Indicator AnalysisFootnote 2

  1. Data from the 2013 tax year show that 79.3% of FSWs claimed employment earnings five years after landing, a figure that is 16% higher than the Canadian average of 63.2%. Although below target, this difference between FSW employment and the Canadian average increased slightly from 12.6% in 2012.
  2. Data from the 2013 tax year show that approximately 47% of FSWs showed employment earnings at or above the Canadian average five years after landing, well exceeding the target of 35%.
  3. The rate of FSWs on social assistance five years after landing was 3.8% for the 2013 tax year, which is a decrease from 4% in 2012 but within the acceptable range of less than or equal to 5%. It is also lower than the Canadian average of 6.0% for the same period.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Federal Skilled Tradespersons

The Federal Skilled Tradespersons (FST) Program is intended to attract skilled tradespersons who can meet labour demands in specific trades across the country and who are granted permanent residence based on being qualified in a skilled trade. In contrast with the FSW Program’s points-based selection, the FST Program operates on a streamlined pass/fail basis with four mandatory criteria including: a minimum language threshold; a valid offer of employment in Canada or a certificate of qualification from a province or territory in a qualifying skilled trade; at least two years of work experience in the occupation within the last five years; and meeting the employment requirements set out in the National Occupational Classification system. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 7 4 -3
Spending 1,746,420 1,018,328 -728,092
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
FSTs support the long-term economic goals of Canada with skills that are in demand in the Canadian economy and labour market 1. FST principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing are available Data not available
2. Percentage of FST principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing are available Data not available
3. Rate of social assistance for FST principal applicants, five years after landing TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing are available Data not available

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. The FST Program was launched in January 2013 to facilitate the immigration of skilled tradespersons in response to the growing demand in certain industry sectors. This program emphasizes practical training and work experience, which are key to the employability of skilled tradespersons. As the program was launched less than three years ago, no FSTs have been in Canada for a sufficient period of time to obtain baseline or other performance data on their economic outcomes. These will be determined in 2020 once the data for sufficient years since landing are available.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Quebec Skilled Workers

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and to issue permanent resident visas. The Quebec Skilled Workers (QSW) Program uses specific criteria to identify immigrants with the human capital and skills needed to establish economically in Quebec. Similar to the FSW Program, the QSW Program assesses applicants according to their age, education, work experience, language proficiency (in French) and enhanced settlement prospects (previous education or work experience in Canada, or a confirmed job offer). The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 59 36 -23
Spending 6,654,807 3,744,398 -2,910,409
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Successful QSW applicants are admitted to Quebec 1. Number of admissions of QSWs destined to Quebec 26,000–27,000 23,370

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, a total of 23,370 people were admitted to Quebec under the QSW Program, which is approximately 10% below the low end of the target range of 26,000 to 27,000. The Department continues to work bilaterally with Quebec to address known issues. It remains committed to processing Quebec business immigrants in accordance with the province’s published targets and ensuring that these individuals meet all federal program requirements.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Provincial Nominees

The Provincial Nominees (PN) Program supports the Government of Canada’s objective that the benefits of immigration be shared across all regions of Canada. Bilateral immigration agreements are in place with all provinces and territories except Nunavut and Quebec,Footnote 3 conferring on their governments the authority to identify and nominate for permanent residence immigrants who will meet local economic development and regional labour market needs, and who wish to settle in that specific province or territory. As part of the nomination process, provincial and territorial governments assess the skills, education and work or business experience of prospective candidates to ensure that nominees can make an immediate economic contribution to the nominating province or territory. IRCC retains the final authority to select nominees who can establish economically in Canada, and verifies that nominees meet all admissibility requirements before issuing permanent resident visas. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 50 45 -5
Spending 5,431,823 5,332,773 -99,050
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
PNs support the long-term economic goals of Canada with applicants that are nominated by provinces and territories in response to regional economic and labour market needs 1. Percentage of PN principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing ≥ 25% 49.4%
PNs support the long-term economic goals of the province or territory of nomination 2. PN principal applicants’ incidence of employment, in their province or territory of nomination, relative to that province or territory’s incidence of employment earnings, five years after landing ≥ + 10% +19.8%
PNs contribute to the shared benefits of immigration in regions of Canada 3. Percentage of PNs who settle that are retained outside of Toronto and Vancouver census metropolitan areas (excludes Quebec and QSWs) ≥ 90% 84.9%

Performance Indicator AnalysisFootnote 4

  1. Data from the 2013 tax year show that 49.4% of PNs had employment earnings at or above the Canadian average five years after landing, well exceeding the target of 25%.
  2. Data from the 2013 tax year show that the incidence of employment for PNs in all provinces on average is approximately 20% higher than the incidence of employment for Canadians in all provinces. This result reflects the fact that the PN program targets regional labour market shortages and many PNs have a job offer at the time of nomination.
  3. The percentage of PNs who settled and were retained outside Canada’s three largest census metropolitan areas decreased slightly from 85.7% in 2014 to 84.9% in 2015. While not achieving the 90% target, this figure is still higher than the rate for all new permanent residents, which represents a significant contribution to more regionally balanced immigration patterns.

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Live-in CaregiversFootnote 5

The Live-in Caregivers Program allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign workers in private residences to provide care for children, elderly persons or persons with a disability. Eligible applicants come to Canada as foreign nationals authorized for temporary work, subject to their employer obtaining a neutral or positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from Employment and Social Development Canada. The LMIA considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available and the wage and working conditions being offered. The critical component of the program distinguishing it from the general pool of foreign nationals authorized for temporary work is the requirement for the caregiver to reside in their place of employment. The program is also unique in that foreign workers arriving in Canada under the program are eligible to apply for permanent residence after two years or 3,900 hours of full-time employment within four years of their arrival in Canada. They are granted permanent residence as part of the live-in caregiver category of the Economic Class, with established room under the annual levels plan. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 92 121 29
Spending 8,686,568 9,854,378 1,167,810
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Eligible live-in caregivers transition from temporary resident status and are admitted to Canada, along with their family members, as permanent residents 1. Number of temporary live-in caregivers and their family members who obtain permanent resident status 26,000–30,000 27,225

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, the number of caregivers (including those under the Live-in Caregiver Program, the Caring for Children Class, the Caring for People with High Medical Needs Class and their family members who obtained permanent resident status) was 27,225. This falls within the target range of 26,000 to 30,000.

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Canadian Experience Class

The Canadian Experience Class (CEC) was introduced in 2008 as a path to permanent residence for those with eligible work experience in Canada, usually obtained as a result of temporary residence as a foreign worker or international student. The program is complementary to the FSW Program but uses different criteria, including eligible skilled Canadian work experience and a minimum level of proficiency in English or French. The program provides a streamlined route to permanent residence for those who have already established themselves in skilled work in Canada. This allows Canada to retain talented workers who have demonstrated a capacity to integrate successfully and contribute to the Canadian economy. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 46 71 25
Spending 4,303,008 5,272,406 969,398
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote 6 Actual Results
Temporary residents who have demonstrated some ability to establish economically in the Canadian labour market transition to permanent residence in support of the long-term economic goals of Canada 1. CEC principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing  +17% + 22.1%
2. Percentage of CEC principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing 40% 57.9%
3. Rate of social assistance for CEC principal applicants, five years after landing 0.8% 0%

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2013, a total of 85.3% of CEC principal applicants claimed employment earnings four years after landing, a figure that is 22.1% higher than the Canadian average of 63.2%.
  2. Approximately 58% of CEC principal applicants showed employment earnings at or above the Canadian average.
  3. In the same period, CEC principal applicants’ rate of social assistance four years after landing was 0% for the 2013 tax year, well below the Canadian average of 6.0%.

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Federal Business Immigrants

Federal business immigrants admitted to Canada are intended to have the experience and skills to support, through their investment, entrepreneurial ideas and business skills, or self-employment, the development of a strong and prosperous economy. The program was designed so that immigrant investors bring business capital to Canada, while entrepreneurs contribute to economic development through business ideas and skills that promote enterprise and employment creation. Self-employed persons hold the intention and ability to be self-employed in Canada in such fields as athletics, cultural activities and farming, thereby making a contribution to specified activities in our economy. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 19 14 -5
Spending 19,724,439 11,475,073 -8,249,366
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
The investment, entrepreneurship skills and ideas of successful applicants to the Federal Business Immigrants Program contribute to strengthening the Canadian economy 1. Number of Federal Business Immigrant principal applicants admitted to CanadaFootnote 7 1,000–1,700 974

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, a total of 974 people were admitted to Canada under the Federal Business Immigrants Program (324 were principal applicants and 650 were dependants). This falls below the established target range of 1,000 to 1,700.

Sub-Program 1.1.8: Quebec Business Immigrants

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and issue permanent resident visas. This program seeks to attract experienced investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons to the province of Quebec, to support the development of a strong and prosperous economy in Quebec. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 4 1 -3
Spending 473,957 328,714 -145,243
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Successful Quebec-selected Business Immigrant applicants and family members are admitted to Quebec 1. Number of admissions of Quebec-selected business immigrants and family members destined to Quebec 5,000–5,500 5,417

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, IRCC admitted 5,417 Quebec business immigrants, which fell within the target range of 5,000 to 5,500. This is also an increase of 39% from the 3,896 admissions reported in 2014. The Department is continuing to work bilaterally with Quebec to address known issues, and remains committed to processing Quebec business immigrants in accordance with the province’s published targets, and ensuring that these individuals meet all federal immigration requirements.

Program 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in IRPA, the focus of this program is to establish and apply the rules governing entry into Canada of foreign nationals authorized for temporary work and international students. Temporary economic migration enhances Canada’s trade, commerce, cultural, educational and scientific activities, in support of our overall economic and social prosperity and national interests. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas (TRV), work permits and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

The following sub-programs support the Temporary Economic Residents Program.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Students

IRCC supports a range of goals for immigration by managing the entry of international students to Canada. International students contribute to Canada’s educational and international competitiveness, and strengthen our educational institutions. International students are selected by Canadian institutions according to their respective criteria, and IRCC authorizes their entry into Canada to study by approving study permits and, where necessary, visas, which allow them to obtain a Canadian education. IRCC is responsible for ensuring that the proper documentation, financial and security requirements are met, including the bona fides of all applicants. In order to provide students with additional opportunities to obtain Canadian work experience, qualified international students are authorized to work either on or off campus without a work permit, or as part of a co-op or internship program with a co-op work permit. Students who want to work in Canada after graduation can apply for a work permit under the Post-Graduation Work Permit component, which allows them to gain up to three years of Canadian work experience. Some post-graduation work permit holders will also be eligible to apply for permanent residence under the CEC or other programs. The selection and processing of international students involve the issuance of temporary resident visas and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 73 79 6
Spending 8,207,415 7,455,260 -752,155
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Educational institutions and international students benefit from having foreign nationals study and work in Canada 1. Number of student entries into Canada 110,000–125,000Footnote 8 221,486

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, there were 221,486 foreign student entries into Canada. This exceeded the target range by 96,486 admissions. This difference is largely due to the change in data methodologyFootnote 9 and is not representative of such a large increase in foreign student entries. Using the updated methodology, the actual increase in foreign student entries from 2014 to 2015 was 7.8%. The target range using the new methodology will be reflected in the 2016-17 DPR.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Temporary Work Authorization

Foreign nationals can be authorized to work in Canada through various processes. Under situations that require an LMIA, employers are able to hire foreign workers as a last resort to meet their short-term or acute labour and skills needs when qualified Canadian citizens or permanent residents are not available, ensuring that Canadians have the first opportunity for jobs where appropriate. In order to hire a temporary foreign worker to respond to labour market shortages, employers require an LMIA from Employment and Social Development Canada, which considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available, examines the wage and working conditions being offered, and assesses whether the job offer would have a negative, neutral or positive effect on the Canadian labour market. Once the potential employer is in possession of the LMIA, the foreign national may then apply for the work permit at a mission abroad, at the port of entry (if eligible) or inside Canada (if eligible). In certain situations, employers can also seek to employ foreign nationals to work in Canada without an LMIA. Exemptions from the LMIA process are offered where they support broader Canadian interests such as the competitive advantages and reciprocal benefits that Canadians enjoy as a result of international agreements and partnerships (including the North American Free Trade Agreement and others). Under these circumstances, the foreign national applies to IRCC for a work permit overseas, at a port of entry (if eligible) or from inside Canada (if eligible). IRCC’s role is to manage the authorization of foreign nationals to work in Canada. IRCC ensures the foreign national meets all admissibility and eligibility requirements, and, when an LMIA is not required, considers the genuineness of the job offer, while also ensuring a robust operation is in place to enforce employer compliance with program requirements. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas and work permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 143 243 100
Spending 16,070,623 22,624,527 6,553,904
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Eligible foreign nationals authorized for temporary work enter Canada, consistent with regulations and standards 1. Number of entries into Canada of foreign nationals authorized for temporary work 150,000–210,000Footnote 10 249,231

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, temporary foreign worker entries, including entries under the International Mobility Program, were 249,231. This exceeded the target range by 39,231. This higher-than-expected result reflects a change in data methodology.Footnote 11 Using the updated methodology, it shows that temporary foreign worker entries decreased by 13% from 2014 to 2015. The target range using the new methodology will be reflected in the 2016-17 DPR.

Sub-Program 1.2.3: International Experience Canada

International Experience Canada (IEC) is a cultural exchange program that permits Canadians and foreign nationals, aged 18-35, to travel and work in other countries for six months to two years at a time. Foreign participants are issued work permits that are exempt from the requirement of an LMIA on the basis that their work in Canada creates or maintains reciprocal employment for Canadians in other countries. Some foreign participants will also be eligible to apply for permanent residence under the CEC or other programs, thereby contributing to Canada’s permanent economic immigration objectives.Footnote 12 Young Canadian participants in other countries obtain foreign work experience, which benefits their future careers in the Canadian workplace and contributes to Canada’s international competitiveness. Exchanges with foreign countries contribute to national interests by strengthening Canada’s bilateral relations and supporting Canada’s economic and trade agenda. Most IEC exchanges occur through bilateral reciprocal Youth Mobility Agreements (YMAs) with other countries. IRCC sets the maximum number of foreign national participants it will permit annually, and on an annual basis negotiates bilateral quotas with each country with which Canada has a YMA. The “Participation Fee” paid by approved foreign participants generates revenue to completely fund program costs. Key program activities include YMA negotiation and liaison with new and existing countries; promotion of program participation to Canadians and foreign nationals; and stakeholder engagement to facilitate participation and enhance program accessibility for Canadian youth. Foreign national participant application selection and processing involves the issuance of temporary resident visas and work permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants. Canadians’ applications are processed by the governments of the countries where they would like to participate.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 54 54 0
Gross Expenditures 9,937,812 8,986,186 -951,626
Respendable Revenue -9,937,812 -9,694,236 243,576
Net Revenue 0 -708,050 -708,050
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Exchanges of Canadian and foreign participants are reciprocal 1. Ratio of IEC foreign participants to Canadian participants 2:1
(by 2019)
3:1
Foreign exchange participants are low-risk (in terms of immigration violations as well as the safety and security of Canada) 2. Work permit approval rate of IEC foreign national applicants relative to work permit approval rate of all foreign national applicants ≥ 11%Footnote 13 0%
The skills of selected IEC participants are retained through transition to permanent residence in support of the long-term economic goals of Canada 3. Number of former IEC foreign participants transitioning to permanent residence as principal applicants in economic immigration categories 1,000Footnote 14 854

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, the ratio of IEC foreign participants to Canadian participants was 3:1, which is higher than the target of 2:1 (by 2019). IRCC continues to work on engaging Canadians to increase participation in the program.
  2. The work permit approval rate of IEC foreign national applicants in 2015 was the same relative to the work permit approval rate of all foreign national applicants (90%).
  3. In 2015, there were 854 former IEC foreign participants who transitioned to permanent residence as principal applicants in economic immigration categories. The goal of IEC is not to promote pathways to permanent residency, but following their experience in Canada, some foreign participants may wish to remain in Canada permanently and be eligible to apply for permanent residence.

Program 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration

IRCC’s family and discretionary programs support the Government of Canada’s social goals for immigration. The program’s objectives are to reunite family members in Canada, and to allow for the processing of exceptional cases. Family Class provisions of IRPA enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada to apply to sponsor eligible members of the Family Class, including spouses and partners, dependent children, and parents and grandparents. Discretionary provisions in the legislation are used in cases where there are humanitarian and compassionate considerations or for public policy reasons. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional and deserving cases not anticipated in the legislation and to support the Government of Canada in its humanitarian response to world events and crises. Eligibility assessment and processing involve the granting of permanent or temporary residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

The following sub-programs support the Family and Discretionary Immigration Program.

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification

The objective of this program is to grant permanent resident status to foreign nationals who are the sponsored spouses, partners and dependent children (including adopted children) of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This supports the government’s objective to reunite close family members while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. The sponsor, who is a permanent resident or Canadian citizen, is responsible for providing the basic needs of his or her spouse or partner for three years, and for their dependent children for up to 10 years. Processing involves determining the sponsor’s ability to meet the sponsorship obligations and verifying the bona fides of the relationships. Given the close family relationships involved, these family members are the highest priority for processing. Eligibility assessment and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 186 220 34
Spending 21,402,960 18,634,716 -2,768,244
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Spouses, partners and children are reunited with their sponsor in Canada 1. Number of admissions of spouses, partners and children 45,000–48,000 49,672Footnote 15
Reunification applications for immediate family members are processed within published service standards 2. Percentage adherence to the 12-month service standard for cases processed overseas 80% 59%

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, Canada supported family reunification with 49,672 admissions of spouses, partners and children, exceeding the target range by 1,672 admissions, or 3.5%. This is an increase from 48,511 admissions in 2014.
  2. In 2015, IRCC adhered to its service standard for processing overseas reunification applications within 12 months in 59% of cases, falling short of the 80% target. This adherence rate was lower than the 65% that was reported in 2014. IRCC’s ability to achieve the targeted service standard is affected by a number of factors, including those beyond its control, such as incomplete applications and the need to return to clients to obtain additional information in order to process an application to completion. The Department continues to assess these factors and focus on finding efficiencies to aid in processing applications and easing the administrative burden.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification

The objective of this program is to grant permanent resident status to sponsored foreign nationals who are the parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This program makes it possible for Canadian citizens and permanent residents to be reunited with their extended family members, while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. Sponsors must demonstrate, on the basis of three years of Canada Revenue Agency documentation, that they meet minimum necessary income thresholds to sponsor, and can meet their sponsorship obligations (which include providing for the basic needs of their parents and grandparents for 20 years). These requirements, together with this category’s lower processing priority, distinguish it from the spouses, partners and dependent children category. Processing involves the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 85 114 29
Spending 8,796,393 8,380,078 -416,315
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Parents and grandparents are reunited with their sponsor in Canada 1. Number of admissions of parents and grandparents 18,000–20,000 15,489

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, parent and grandparent admissions were 15,489, which was 2,511 lower than the low end of the target range for this program. This is a decrease from 18,150 in 2014, and can be explained in part by the fact that IRCC reopened intake of applications on January 1, 2014, following a pause in applications intake issued in November 2011. In February 2016, to respond to the Government’s commitment, the intake cap for this category was raised from 5,000 to 10,000 applications.

Sub-Program 2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations

The humanitarian and compassionate and public policy provisions of IRPA enable the Minister to address exceptional circumstances by granting an exception to certain criteria or obligations of the Act or by granting permanent or temporary residence. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional cases that were not envisioned in the legislation. Under the humanitarian and compassionate provisions of IRPA, an applicant’s circumstances are assessed on a case-by-case basis, taking into account establishment in Canada, the best interests of a child, and other relevant circumstances brought forward for consideration. The public policy provision is a discretionary tool designed to grant permanent or temporary resident status to individuals in similar circumstances, all of whom must meet eligibility criteria defined in the public policy. The outcome of this program is that exceptional cases are treated with appropriate flexibility, in accordance with Canadian values. Eligibility assessment and processing involve the granting of permanent or temporary residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 82 81 -1
Spending 7,372,705 6,605,402 -767,303
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
On an exceptional basis, persons are admitted or are allowed to remain in Canada and acquire permanent resident status 1. Number of persons granted permanent resident status on humanitarian and compassionate or public policy grounds due to their exceptional circumstances 3,900–5,200 4,421

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, there were 4,421 admissions on humanitarian and compassionate or public policy grounds, which fell within the target range. This is a decrease from 5,336 admissions in 2014. A distinguishing feature of these immigration categories is that demand may vary, depending on a range of circumstances beyond the forecasting capability of the Department.

Program 2.2: Refugee Protection

The Refugee Protection Program is in the first instance about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted. One arm of the program starts overseas, where refugees and persons in refugee-like situations are selected by Canadian visa officers to be resettled as permanent residents to Canada. Flowing from Canada's international and domestic legal obligations, the in-Canada asylum system evaluates the claims of individuals seeking asylum in Canada and grants protected person status when a positive decision is rendered by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB).

The following sub-programs support the Refugee Protection Program.

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Government-Assisted Refugees

Working closely with the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and other referral agencies, Canadian visa officers within the Government-Assisted Refugees (GAR) Program identify and select as permanent residents, members of the Convention Refugees Abroad class for resettlement in Canada when there is no other durable solution available within a reasonable period of time. The primary objectives of the program are to provide individual protection solutions to refugees, to affirm Canada’s humanitarian commitment to assist refugees in need of international protection through the provision of government assistance, and to assist the countries hosting them through responsibility sharing.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 38 106 68
Spending 5,267,340 45,892,977 40,625,637
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
GARs are granted protection and resettled to Canada 1. Number of admissions of resettled GARs 5,800–6,500 9,411

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, GAR admissions were 9,411, which exceeded the target range for this indicator by 2,911 admissions, or 45%. This is a substantial increase from 7,573 admissions in 2014. This is primarily due to the higher landing of GARs from Syria.

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees

The primary objective of the Privately Sponsored Refugees (PSR) Program is to partner with civil society to provide durable solutions to more refugees than would otherwise be admitted under the GAR Program. Canadian visa officers select as permanent residents members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada who are referred by private sponsors. These private sponsors then provide the social, financial and emotional support to the refugees upon their arrival in Canada. The program is unique as it engages ordinary Canadians and permanent residents in Canada’s international refugee protection efforts and ensures an additional number of refugees are offered protection over and above those sponsored by the government.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 37 62 25
Spending 4,010,873 29,124,182 25,113,309
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
PSRs are granted protection and resettled to Canada 1. Number of admissions of resettled PSRs 4,500–6,500 9,350
Private sponsors participate in PSR resettlement 2. Number of approved PSR sponsorship applications 5,000–5,700 8,131

Performance Indicator Analysis

Extraordinary results in the government’s resettlement programs were achieved in 2015-16 in response to global events, particularly with respect to the Syrian refugee initiative.

  1. In 2015, PSR admissions were 9,350, which exceeded the target range for this indicator by 2,850 admissions, or 44%. This is a substantial increase from 4,560 admissions in 2014.
  2. In 2015, a total of 8,131 PSR sponsorship applications were approved, which exceeded the target range for this indicator by 2,431, or 43%.

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Blended Visa Office-Referred Refugees

Working closely with the UNHCR, Canadian visa officers identify and select as permanent residents, members of the Convention Refugees Abroad class for resettlement in Canada when there is no other durable solution available within a reasonable period of time. Refugees referred by the visa office are matched with a private sponsor and, upon arrival in Canada, receive six months of income support from the Government of Canada via the Resettlement Assistance Program and six months of income support from their sponsor. Private sponsors also provide arrival and orientation services, temporary accommodation, and ongoing emotional and social support for 12 months. The program is a unique public-private partnership that encourages faith-based, ethnocultural and other community organizations in Canada to play a larger role in offering durable solutions to refugees found to be in need of resettlement by the UNHCR, supporting the objectives of both the GAR and PSR programs.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 3 3 0
Spending 286,011 4,949,818 4,663,807
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Blended visa office-referred refugees (BVORs) are granted protection and resettled to Canada 1. Number of admissions of resettled BVORs 700–1,000 810
Private sponsors participate in BVOR resettlement 2. Number of approved BVOR sponsorship applications 700–1,000 534

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, BVOR admissions were 810, which fell within the target range. This is a substantial increase from 177 admissions in 2014, the first full fiscal year for the BVOR program at IRCC.
  2. In 2015, a total of 534 BVOR sponsorship applications were approved, which fell short of the target range for this indicator by 166, or 23%. The BVOR sponsorship program is still being established, and it is expected that this target will be fully met in future years.

Sub-Program 2.2.4: In-Canada Asylum

Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, Canada’s asylum system provides protection to persons fleeing persecution and risk of torture, risk to life, or risk of cruel treatment or punishment, by way of legislative and regulatory measures that enable Canada to meet those obligations. The program establishes fair and efficient procedures that uphold Canada’s respect for the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all human beings, while maintaining the overall integrity of the Canadian refugee determination system. Canada’s asylum system ensures that fair consideration is granted to those who come to Canada claiming persecution. Those found by the IRB to be in need of refugee protection receive protected person status, and may apply for permanent residence.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 173 189 16
Spending 15,073,049 15,211,103 138,054
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Protected persons in-Canada and their dependants abroad are admitted as permanent residents 1. Number of admissions of protected persons in-Canada and their dependants abroad 10,000–11,000 11,930
Decisions made on eligibility of in-Canada refugee claims are rendered within three working days 2. Percentage of decisions on eligibility of refugee claims rendered within three working days ≥ 97% 92%

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015-16, there were 11,930 admissions of refugee claimants and their dependants landing in Canada, which exceeded the target range by 930.
  2. In 2015-16, decisions on eligibility for in-Canada refugee claims were rendered within three working days in 92% of cases, which missed the target by 5%. This is a decrease from 2014, when 98% of decisions were rendered within three days.

Sub-Program 2.2.5: Pre-Removal Risk Assessment

In accordance with its commitment to the principle of non-refoulement, IRCC may offer a risk assessment before removing a person from Canada. Under IRPA, people who have been issued a removal order may apply to IRCC for a Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA). When a person has already had a refugee protection claim assessed by the IRB, only new evidence, such as evidence that demonstrates a sudden change in country conditions, is considered. While some persons whose applications are approved may benefit from a stay of removal, others whose applications are approved may become “protected persons” and may apply and be granted permanent resident status. For most claimants, only one PRRA is allowed in a 12-month period—in other words, a claimant cannot apply for a PRRA for one year following a final decision on a refugee claim from the IRB or a final PRRA decision. For claimants from designated countries of origin, the bar on accessing a PRRA is 36 months.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 60 115 55
Spending 5,422,579 9,083,253 3,660,674
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
PRRA decisions are made in compliance with IRPA 1. Percentage of PRRA decisions returned to IRCC by the Federal Court for redetermination < 1% N/A

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. Due to system changes, data are currently unavailable. Data are expected to be available during fall 2016.

Program 3.1: Newcomer Settlement and Integration

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Employment Equity Act and IRPA, programming is developed based on policies that support the settlement, resettlement, adaptation and integration of newcomers into Canadian society. All permanent residents are eligible for settlement and integration programs. Programming is delivered by third parties (including provincial and municipal governments, school boards and post-secondary institutions, settlement service organizations and other non-governmental actors, and the private sector) across the country.

The following sub-programs and sub-sub-programs support the Newcomer Settlement and Integration Program.

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Settlement

Settlement refers to a short period (three to five years) of adaptation by newcomers during which the government provides support and services. Ultimately, the goal of integration is to encourage newcomers to be fully engaged in the economic, social, political and cultural life of Canada. IRCC’s Settlement Program assists immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers specific to the newcomer experience, such as a lack of official language skills, limited knowledge of Canada and the recognition of foreign credentials. The program provides language learning services for newcomers, community and employment bridging services, settlement information, and support services that facilitate access to settlement programming. Also, through the Foreign Credentials Referral Office, the program provides information, path-finding and referral services to internationally trained individuals to have their credentials assessed quickly so they can find work in the fields in which they have been trained. Most services are designed and delivered by service provider organizations (SPOs); however, certain services (such as information provision) are delivered directly by IRCC in Canada and overseas.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 281 256 -25
Spending 614,370,290 601,625,334 -12,744,956
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote 16 Actual Results
Clients make informed decisions about life in CanadaFootnote 17 1. Percentage of clients who are able to make informed decisions about life in Canada TBD N/A
Clients use official languages to function and participate in Canadian society 2. Average percentage of clients (landed in Canada for at least two years) who use official languages to function and participate in Canadian society TBD N/A
Clients participate in society 3. Percentage of clients (landed in Canada for at least one year) who participated in Canadian society in the last year TBD N/A

Performance Indicator AnalysisFootnote 18

  1. The proxy indicator for this expected result is the number of unique clients who received information and orientation services in 2015-16. In 2015-16, a total of 296,849 unique clients received this service, as compared to 262,911 in 2014-15. In addition to accessibility, the type of information received is also important. In 2015-16, a total of 75,665 unique clients received an overview of Canada, 53,842 unique clients learned about Canadian law and justice and 52,127 unique clients received information about rights and freedoms. Other key areas of information provided included: money and finances (83,931 unique clients served); health (90,565 unique clients served); housing (51,270 unique clients served); education (118,812 unique clients served); important documents (152,554 unique clients served); and communications and media (38,328 unique clients served). Please note that these figures do not equal the total number of unique clients who received information and orientation services (296,849) as there is overlap in the topics in which clients participate.
  2. Being able to function in one of Canada’s official languages requires access to language training, which serves as the proxy indicator for this expected result. In 2015-16, a total of 106,660 unique clients accessed language training services.
  3. Making connections in the community is integral to being able to participate in Canadian society. IRCC’s Community Connections initiative seeks to link newcomers to groups, organizations and individuals in the community. In 2015-16, a total of 59,692 unique clients received services through Community Connections. Usage of services mentioned above (language and information and orientation services) also helped newcomers participate in Canadian society.
Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.1: Language Training

The ability of newcomers to communicate in one of Canada’s official languages has long been recognized as key to both the initial settlement and the longer-term integration of immigrants. Language learning services are intended to help newcomers develop sufficient linguistic communication skills (including literacy) to enable newcomers to function in Canadian society and contribute to the economy. Through the Settlement Program, IRCC funds SPOs to deliver various language learning services for newcomers, including language assessment and official language instruction. This program uses transfer payment funding from the Settlement Program.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 97 64 -33
Spending 279,752,228 266,606,488 -13,145,740
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote 19 Actual Results
Clients learn official language skills for adapting to Canadian society 1. Annual percentage of language training clients who increased at least one Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) level for at least three of four skills ≥ 15% 15.39%
2. Annual percentage of language training clients who have completed CLB four or above in listening and speaking ≥ 10% 40.64%
3. Percentage of clients who reported an improvement in official language skills and attributed their improvement to IRCC language training TBD N/A

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015-16, the annual percentage of language training clients who increased at least one CLB level was 15.39%. This is slightly higher than the target set in the 2016-17 RPP.
  2. In 2015-16, the annual percentage of language training clients who completed CLB level four or above in listening and speaking was 40.64%. This greatly exceeds the target that was set in the 2016-17 RPP.
  3. In the future, data for the indicator will be provided by the Settlement Program Client Outcomes Survey. In the interim, the data from the two preceding indicators serve as a proxy result for the third indicator.Footnote 20 The data indicate that 15.39% of clients increased at least one CLB level (for at least three out of four skills), suggesting a general level of improvement overall. The data also suggest that 40.64% of clients completed higher CLB levels of four or above (in listening and speaking), which suggests a large overall improvement at the higher CLB levels.
Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.2: Community and Labour Market Integration Services

Newcomers face a variety of barriers to integration, including the need for information and connections to social and economic networks. Settlement information, bridging and other support services including foreign credential referrals, attempt to address these barriers. SPOs are funded to design and deliver bridging services that facilitate newcomers’ connections to the labour market and the wider community. Through IRCC offices and SPOs, the program also provides prospective immigrants and newcomers with access to settlement-related information so that they can make informed decisions about immigrating to and settling in Canada. The program also funds SPOs to offer services that improve newcomers’ access to settlement programming; these support services include childminding and transportation. Information on foreign credential recognition is provided in-person and by telephone on behalf of the Foreign Credentials Referral Office by Service Canada and through the IRCC Web site to prospective immigrants overseas. This program uses transfer payment funding from the Settlement Program.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 184 192 8
Spending 334,618,062 335,018,846 400,784
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote 21 Actual Results
Clients gain knowledge of life in Canada 1. Percentage of clients who acquired knowledge about life in Canada and attributed it to government Web sites or service providers TBD N/A
Clients acquire skills to function in the Canadian work environment 2. Percentage of clients who received IRCC services and acquired knowledge about skills to function in the Canadian work environment and attribute this to IRCC services TBD N/A
3. Percentage of employed clients who received IRCC services and who are working in a job that either matches or is related to their skills and experience TBD N/A

Performance Indicator AnalysisFootnote 22

  1. In 2015-16, a total of 399,192 unique clients received at least one settlement service. Of this amount, 296,849 unique clients received information and orientation services. Furthermore, of those who received information and orientation services, 194,441 unique clients were informed about other sources of information as part of information and orientation services. This information would have been provided to clients by SPOs through different media, including the Internet. Therefore, this serves as a proxy expected result for this indicator.
  2. Proxy data are used to measure to what extent clients acquire skills to function in the Canadian work environment (performance indicators two and three above). In 2015-16, a total of 399,192 unique clients received at least one settlement service. This is higher than 2014-15, when 355,670 received at least one settlement service. Of these clients, 31,573 received employment services. Employment services are provided to meet short-term needs (such as networking opportunities and employment counselling) and long-term needs (developing work skills, seeking jobs, etc.). In all, 28,388 unique clients received short-term interventions, while 5,791 received long-term interventions.

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Grant to Quebec

Under the Canada-Quebec Accord, signed in 1991, Canada has devolved settlement and resettlement responsibility to Quebec, with a grant that includes reasonable compensation for costs. The compensation to Quebec covers services for reception services and linguistic, cultural and economic integration services, provided that they are equivalent to similar federal services in other parts of the country. An objective of the Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec’s demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants into that province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec. The Accord provides Quebec with exclusive responsibility for the selection of immigrants destined to the province (except for family reunification and asylum seekers in Canada) as well as the reception and linguistic and cultural integration of these immigrants (including resettlement of refugees). Under the Accord, Canada is responsible for defining overall immigration objectives, national levels, admissibility, selecting family category and asylum seekers in Canada, and citizenship. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 0 0 0
Spending 340,568,000 345,059,000 4,491,000
Performance Result
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Actual Result
Quebec provides settlement and integration services to newcomers in the province that are comparable to services provided across Canada 1. Frequency of Comité MixteFootnote 23 meetings 1 1

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. The annual Comité Mixte meeting was held on June 18, 2015, with members of IRCC and their counterparts in the Government of Quebec. Officials approved the Comparison of reception and linguistic, cultural and economic integration services for immigrants offered by Canada and Quebec 2015 at the meeting, which is to be updated on an annual basis. Beginning in 2016-17, this comparison will be available as a performance indicator for the Grant to Quebec.

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Immigration Loan

The Immigration Loan Program is a statutory program under IRPA. It ensures that some persons, otherwise unable to pay for the costs of transportation to Canada and medical admissibility exams, have access to a funding source. Assistance loans may also be approved for newcomers in need to cover initial settlement expenses such as rental and utilities deposits. The main target groups for the program are resettled refugees. These individuals have undergone extreme hardship and most often have few personal resources and are therefore unable to access traditional lending institutions. Canadian visa officers authorize the transportation and admissibility loans and the International Organization for Migration arranges travel and medical exams for refugees and pays these costs. IRCC reimburses them and the refugee reimburses IRCC through loan repayments. Assistance loans are authorized by in-Canada officers. The interest-bearing loans are repayable in full and payment plans vary by the value of the loan and the recipients’ ability to repay while integrating.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 12 10 -2
Spending 1,263,678 1,008,271 -255,407
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Individuals in need receive and repay immigration loans 1. Percentage of resettled refugees by family unit (i.e., principal applicants) that receive transportation and/or admissibility loans 100% 73%
2. Percentage of resettled refugees by family unit (i.e., principal applicants) that receive settlement assistance loans 40% 25%
3. Percentage of loan recipients who repay their immigration loans within the original prescribed loan period 75%Footnote 24 74%

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, a total of 73% of principal applicant refugees who landed in Canada received immigration loans. While this is lower than the target of 100%, it is largely due to the Government’s efforts late in the year to quickly resettle Syrian refugees; in doing so, the Government paid for their medical examinations and travel to Canada.
  2. In 2015, 25% of principal applicants who landed in Canada received settlement assistance loans. While this is lower than the target of 40%, it is likely due to the Government’s efforts to resettle Syrian refugees as these refugees did not need to take out transportation loans and thus had less need of assistance soon after arrival in Canada. In addition, through coordinated efforts with the Canadian private sector and civil society, many Syrian refugees received material support upon arrival in Canada.
  3. In 2015, a total of 74% of immigration loan recipients repaid their loans within the original prescribed loan period.

Sub-Program 3.1.4: Resettlement Assistance Program

The Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP) provides direct financial support and immediate and essential services to RAP clients, including GARs, PSRs in blended initiatives under the BVOR Program, and persons in refugee-like situations admitted to Canada under a public policy consideration, to meet their resettlement needs. In most cases RAP clients have undergone extreme hardship and may lack the social networks and the financial resources to assist in addressing the needs associated with becoming established in a new country. Income support is administered directly by IRCC to RAP clients for up to 12 months if the RAP client’s income is insufficient to meet his or her own needs and the needs of any accompanying dependents. In some cases, RAP clients also receive start-up allowances for expenses related to furniture and other household supplies. Immediate and essential services are supported through contributions to SPOs in all provinces in Canada except Quebec, which delivers similar settlement services through the Canada-Quebec Accord. RAP services include, but are not limited to, port of entry services, assistance with temporary accommodations, assistance opening a bank account, life skills training, orientation sessions, and links to settlement programming and mandatory federal and provincial programs. This program uses transfer payment funding from RAP.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 32 53 21
Spending 57,815,172 159,338,252 101,523,080
Performance Results
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
GARs have access to IRCC settlement services 1. Percentage of GARs outside Quebec who access settlement services within six months after arrival ≥ 85% 93.5%
GARs have their immediate and essential needs met 2. Percentage of GARs who report that their immediate and essential resettlement needs were met by RAP services 80% N/A

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015-16, the uptake of IRCC settlement services by GARs within six months of arrival was 93.5%. This exceeded the target by 8.5%.
  2. Data for the second indicator were not available for the tabling of the 2015-16 RPP; therefore, a proxy indicator was used from a survey of GAR clients conducted as part of the 2016 Evaluation of Resettlement Programs. The results of the survey outline the extent to which GARs felt that the information received from RAP SPOs met their needs. In this instance, more than 74% of GARs who responded to the survey reported having their immediate and essential needs met by their SPOs, depending on their specific needs. As an example, some specific results are as follows:
    • 74.2% indicated that they were mostly or completely satisfied with the information provided by SPOs on how to look for a place to live;
    • 80.8% indicated that they were mostly or completely satisfied with the information provided by SPOs on how to look for a doctor;
    • 83.1% indicated that they were mostly or completely satisfied with the information provided by SPOs on how to use public transportation; and
    • 85% indicated that they were mostly or completely satisfied with the information provided by SPOs on how to use Canadian money.

Program 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians

The purpose of the Citizenship Program is to administer citizenship legislation and promote the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship. IRCC administers the acquisition of Canadian citizenship by developing, implementing and applying legislation, regulations and policies that protect the integrity of Canadian citizenship and allow eligible applicants to be granted citizenship or be provided with a proof of citizenship. In addition, the program promotes citizenship, to both newcomers and the Canadian-born, through various events, materials and projects. Promotional activities focus on enhancing knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions and values, as well as fostering an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

The following sub-programs support the Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians Program.

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness

The Citizenship Awareness Program aims to enhance the meaning of Canadian citizenship for both newcomers and the Canadian-born and to increase a sense of belonging to Canada. Through knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions and values, as well as the rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship, newcomers and the Canadian-born are better equipped for active citizenship and can contribute to the development of an integrated society. The program undertakes various knowledge-building and promotional activities such as: citizenship ceremonies; citizenship reaffirmation ceremonies; Citizenship Week; and the distribution of citizenship educational publications (e.g., Discover Canada: The Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship study guide, the Welcome to Canada guide). IRCC also partners with the Institute for Canadian Citizenship on citizenship awareness activities. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant for the Institute for Canadian Citizenship for citizenship awareness activities.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 30 35 5
Spending 2,766,015 3,080,291 314,276
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Newcomers and established Canadians are made aware of responsibilities and privileges associated with Canadian citizenship 1. Percentage of enhancedFootnote 25 citizenship ceremonies held in partnership with community or external organizations ≥ 15% 10.5%
2. Percentage of applicants who write and pass the written citizenship knowledge test 80-85% 89%
3. Number of Discover Canada guides distributed (printed and downloaded) ≥ 800,000 833,762

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. Of the 3,327 ceremonies held in 2015-16 nationwide, 10.5% of these were enhanced in partnership with community or external organizations. By working with community partners to enhance ceremonies, IRCC makes citizenship ceremonies more accessible to the public, encourages the take-up of citizenship among eligible newcomers, and provides an opportunity for community members to contribute to and participate in an important nation-building experience. The 2015-16 target for enhanced citizenship ceremonies was 15% of all ceremonies. Many factors contributed to the percentage of enhanced ceremonies being below the target, such as prioritizing file processing (testing, hearings, analysis, decision making, etc.) and use of larger ceremonies in order to eliminate application backlogs, meet a new 12-month processing standard, and make best use of citizenship judges’ time.
  2. In 2015-16, a total of 89% of citizenship applicants passed the written citizenship knowledge test.
  3. Discover Canada, the official citizenship study guide used by newcomers to prepare for the citizenship test, had lower distribution levels in 2015-16, with 53,145 print copies distributed. However, the guide was electronically viewed 839,380 times and downloaded 780,617Footnote 26 times in PDF and electronic publication (EPUB) formats. While distribution of Discover Canada continued in print format in 2015-16, efforts are under way in the Department to encourage the use of electronic versions of the guide.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation

Citizenship processing activities include interpreting and administering the Citizenship Act and Regulations, managing the naturalization process (whereby non-citizens become citizens), issuing proof of citizenship to those who are citizens by birth or by naturalization, and maintaining these records. The processing of applications for Canadian citizenship contributes to newcomers’ abilities to participate in all aspects of Canadian life and enhances their successful integration into Canadian society. IRCC reviews files particularly where there are allegations of fraud and collects and analyzes information to determine if a recommendation to initiate revocation proceedings should be made to the Minister.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 690 965 275
Spending 65,296,764 74,913,655 9,616,891
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote 27 Actual Results
Applications for proofs and grants of citizenship are processed 1. Total number of decisions for grants of citizenship 177,780–249,410 252,602
2. Total number of decisions for proofs of citizenship 55,000 61,254

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015-16, a total of 252,602 citizenship grant decisions were rendered, slightly exceeding the upper end of the target range. This significant accomplishment was made possible by a number of factors, such as temporary funding for additional staff and a focus on meeting the Department’s service standard to process 80% of cases received on or after April 1, 2015 within 12 months. It was also the first full fiscal year in which a new streamlined decision-making model was in place. The 252,602 citizenship grant decisions represent a 12.5% decrease from the exceptionally high number of grant decisions in 2014-15 (288,625). This is due in part to legislative changes that lengthened the time applicants must be physically present in Canada before applying, which reduced the number of new applications received, thereby limiting the number of decisions that were possible.
  2. Decisions regarding proof of citizenship, which confirms status for existing citizens, reached 61,254 in 2015-16. This exceeded the target by 6,254, or 11.4%, and represented a slight increase over 2014-15 figures. The lower number of citizenship grant applications received in 2015-16 provided flexibility to realign resources to process more proof of citizenship applications.

Program 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All CanadiansFootnote 28

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Multiculturalism Program seeks to: build an integrated, socially cohesive society; improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and engage in discussions on multiculturalism, integration and diversity at the international level. To advance these objectives, the Multiculturalism Program: provides grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, the private sector, non-federal public institutions, and individuals; conducts direct public outreach and promotional activities; helps federal institutions to meet their obligations under the Act; supports the annual tabling in Parliament of a report on the operation of the Act; and engages non-federal public institutions seeking to respond to diversity. The Multiculturalism Program also supports Canada’s participation in international agreements and institutions.

The following sub-programs support the Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians Program.

Sub-Program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness

Multiculturalism Awareness comprises a suite of policy, program, public engagement, public education and promotional activities. In addition to developing policies that shape Canada’s stance on diversity issues, grants and contributions are disbursed to successful funding applicants that seek to support the Multiculturalism Program's objectives of building an integrated, socially cohesive society through enhanced intercultural/interfaith understanding, civic memory and pride, respect for core democratic values, and participation in society and the economy. Multiculturalism Awareness also entails direct public outreach and promotional activities, designed to engage citizens and newcomers on multiculturalism issues (for example, Asian Heritage Month, Black History Month and the Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism). The Multiculturalism Awareness Program is also a locus for Canada’s participation in international agreements and institutions such as the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant in support of the Multiculturalism Program and contribution in support of the Multiculturalism Program.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 37 20 -17
Spending 10,886,509 3,854,906 -7,031,603

Sub-Program 3.3.2: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support

Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support efforts are directed toward improving the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population. To help federal institutions meet their obligations under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, this program leads a Multiculturalism Champions Network which serves as a forum for discussing shared challenges, best practices, lessons learned and tools to help institutions implement the Act. The program develops the Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act for tabling in Parliament, which fulfils the Minister's obligations under the Act and serves as an informative tool for institutions seeking best practices. Dialogue with provinces and territories is also provided through a Multiculturalism Program-led Federal-Provincial-Territorial Network of Officials Responsible for Multiculturalism Issues. Lastly, the program fosters policy relationships with the Canadian Race Relations Foundation and the Global Centre for Pluralism. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant in support of the Multiculturalism Program and contribution in support of the Multiculturalism Program.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 15 3 -12
Spending 2,162,557 308,648 -1,853,909

Program 4.1: Health Protection

This program aims to provide effective immigration health services to manage the health aspect of migrant entry and settlement to Canada, and facilitate the arrival of resettled refugees to Canada and their integration while contributing to the protection of the health and safety of all Canadians and contributing to the maintenance of sustainable Canadian health and social services.

The program aims to evaluate health risks related to immigration and coordinate with international and Canadian health partners to develop risk management strategies and processes to assess the health risks posed by applicants wishing to immigrate to Canada. The strategies, processes and interventions are intended to reduce the impact of the risks identified on the health of Canadians and on Canada’s health and social services.

The following sub-programs support the Health Protection Program.

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Health Screening

This program aims to manage the health risks related to permanent and temporary residence according to the three grounds for inadmissibility under IRPA, which are (1) danger to public health, (2) danger to public safety and (3) excessive demand on health or social services.

The immigration medical examination (IME) is a tool used to screen for infectious diseases of public health significance in all applicants for permanent residence and certain applicants for temporary residence. It includes x-rays and lab tests that identify applicants who could pose health threats to Canadians or to the Canadian health and social systems. Those who are considered admissible on health grounds are cleared for entry into Canada; those who are found with infectious disease of public health significance are referred for treatment, where relevant, before admittance to Canada; those who are a danger to public health or public safety or are deemed to cause excessive demand on Canada’s health and social system are deemed inadmissible.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 77 46 -31
Spending 8,829,681 6,509,146 -2,320,535
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Applicants for permanent and temporary residence who pose a risk to public health and/or public safety and/or may be reasonably expected to cause excessive demand on the Canadian social and/or health-care systems are identified 1. Percentage of applicants who should be identified as inadmissible based on the IME results, and who are coded as inadmissible by IRCC medical staff 100% 100%
2. Percentage of new cases of inactive tuberculosis (TB) found during an immigration medical assessment (IMA)Footnote 29 over total number of IMAs 1.5%–2%Footnote 30 1.7%

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In calendar year 2015, IRCC assessed approximately 557,000 IMEs. Of those assessed, 699 cases (0.13%) were deemed inadmissible on the basis of danger to public health or public safety, or for excessive demand on Canadian health and social services; 100% of these were reported as inadmissible by IRCC medical staff.
  2. In the approximately 557,000 IMEs assessed in 2015, there were 9,469 cases of inactive TB identified (1.7% of the total). These clients received or will receive a surveillance notification form for referral to provincial/territorial health authorities upon arrival in Canada.

Sub-Program 4.1.2: Medical Surveillance and Notification

Section 38(1) of IRPA sets danger to public health as one key condition of inadmissibility to Canada. Applicants for temporary or permanent residence in Canada whose immigration medical assessments (IMAs) demonstrate that they may pose risks to public health require further health assessment and monitoring following their landing in Canada in order to ensure that they do not represent a danger to public health.

The Medical Surveillance and Notification Program informs provincial and territorial public health authorities of applicants who require medical surveillance in order to ensure that the terms and conditions of landing are met.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 19 14 -5
Spending 1,609,584 1,514,006 -95,578
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Provincial and territorial public health authorities are notified, for the purposes of medical surveillance, of migrants who pose public health risks 1. Percentage of migrants identified as having inactive TB who landed in Canada and were reported to provincial or territorial health authorities 100% 98.6%
2. Percentage of identified cases of human immunodeficiency virus who landed in Canada and were reported to provincial or territorial health authorities (except for Nova Scotia and Nunavut, which elected to not receive the information) 100% 90.9%

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. For the first indicator, in 2015, of the 5,051 cases where IRCC was informed of the landing and destination of a client with inactive TB, notification to the provinces/territories was possible in 98.6% of cases. For the remaining 71 cases (1.4%), the address was missing from the client information and the province or territory could not be notified. Relevant health authorities will be notified once address information is obtained for all clients identified with inactive TB.
  2. Of the 514 clients identified with human immunodeficiency virus in 2015, 467 (90.9%) were reported to provincial or territorial health authorities. As Nova Scotia and Nunavut have elected not to receive this information, seven clients (1.4%) destined for these jurisdictions were identified but not reported to the relevant health authorities. The remaining 40 clients (7.8%) were not reported due to missing residential addresses. Relevant health authorities will be notified once address information is obtained for all clients identified with human immunodeficiency virus.

Sub-Program 4.1.3: Interim Federal Health

The Interim Federal Health (IFH) Program provides temporary coverage of health-care costs. The target population includes resettled refugees, protected persons, refugee claimants, and persons detained under IRPA. In general, eligibility and level of coverage under the IFH Program are determined by the beneficiary’s status in Canada. The program offers five types of coverage: Expanded Health Coverage, Health-Care Coverage, Public Health or Public Safety Health-Care Coverage, coverage for the IME and coverage for detainees. Most beneficiaries receive Health-Care Coverage, which is a level of coverage similar to the coverage Canadians receive through their provincial/territorial health insurance plans. The program helps protect public health and public safety and supports the successful settlement of resettled refugees receiving government support. IFH Program beneficiaries with valid coverage access health services through registered health-care providers, who are reimbursed directly by the IFH claims administrator for covered services.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 20 10 -10
Spending 52,778,424 33,736,930 -19,041,494
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Eligible clients receive health services that reduce risks to the health and safety of Canadians 1. Percentage of refugee claimants who received an IME covered by the IFH Program 100% 93.6%
2. Percentage of IFH Program beneficiaries by coverage type who obtain health services that reduce risk to public health and public safetyFootnote 31
  1. Public Health or Public Safety Health-Care Coverage (PHPSHCC)
  2. Expanded Health-Care Coverage (EHCC)
  3. Health-Care Coverage (HCC)
  1. PHPSHCC: 100%
  2. EHCC: 44.9%
  3. HCC: 71%
  1. PHPSHCC: 100%
  2. EHCC: 55.1%
  3. HCC: 77.9%

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. From October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015, of 14,674 eligible refugee claimants, 13,739 (93.6%) received an IME covered by the IFH Program and 2.9% abandoned or withdrew their claim for refugee status. The remaining 3.5% may have had an IME for which a claim was not reimbursed by the program; this may also include people who left the country without advising authorities.
  2. All eligible beneficiaries receive, at a minimum, coverage to treat diseases that pose a risk to public health or to treat conditions of public safety concern. From October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015, 100% of the 1,915 beneficiaries eligible for Public Health and Public Safety Coverage, 55.1% of the 14,065 beneficiaries eligible for Expanded Health-Care Coverage, and 77.9% of the 13,367 beneficiaries eligible for Health-Care Coverage received services that reduced the risk to public health and public safety. The results reflect the projected targets and suggest no change or increased risk to public health or public safety.

Program 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management

IRCC facilitates the travel of bona fide permanent residents, visitors, students and temporary workers while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians by effectively managing migration access and controlling entry. This is accomplished through a variety of policy and operational measures, including through the establishment of visa and other document entry requirements and otherwise maintaining the policy framework for terms and conditions of entry, admissibility criteria, anti-fraud measures, negotiations of bilateral and multilateral information sharing agreements and treaties, as well as setting identity management practices. Strategic partnership engagements with security and public safety-related departments are another essential component of this program.

The following sub-programs support the Migration Control and Security Management Program.

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Permanent Resident Status Documents

In accordance with IRPA, IRCC must process and issue to all permanent residents a secure status document for travel purposes. The permanent resident (PR) card serves as proof of permanent resident status in Canada and may be easily verified by commercial carriers and border officers. While the PR card also meets international travel document standards it is not a travel document. The Permanent Resident Status Documents Program makes it difficult to access Canadian territory fraudulently. The program establishes a mechanism to verify compliance with the residency requirement, provides permanent residents with a status document confirming their right to live, work and study in Canada, provides permanent residents with access to government services, and enables them to be recognized and processed quickly at the border, thereby enhancing border security. While not mandatory within Canada, the PR card is required for all permanent residents as proof of their status when seeking to re-enter Canada on a commercial carrier. It contains security features to reduce the risk of fraud. Permanent residents who obtained their status under previous immigration legislation or those who wish to replace an expired, lost or stolen PR card may obtain one upon application. Limited use travel documents are also issued by visa offices overseas to qualified permanent residents outside Canada who do not have a valid PR card, to facilitate return travel to Canada.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 138 264 126
Spending 16,877,123 22,345,325 5,468,202
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote 32 Actual Results
Permanent residents have required documentation to re-enter Canada 1. Number of phase one (new) PR cards issued ≥ 240,000 243,190
2. Number of phase two (renewal/replacement) PR cards issued ≥ 140,000 168,611
3. Number of PR travel documents issued 10,000-20,000 12,271

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015-16, IRCC issued 243,190 new PR cards. This represents a decrease from the 266,270 new PR cards issued in 2014-15. IRCC also issued 168,611 replacement or renewal PR cards. This represents a decrease from the 193,849 replacement or renewal cards issued in 2014-15.
  2. IRCC issued fewer PR cards during the reporting period than it did in 2014-15, mainly as a result of the reallocation of resources within the Department to higher priority areas. Despite this decrease, the number of PR cards fell within anticipated processing volumes for this sub-program.
  3. In the same period, IRCC issued 12,271 PR travel documents, which is 2,470 fewer than the number issued in 2014-15. PR travel documents are issued to PRs who are outside Canada and do not have a valid PR card (card either lost or expired), to enable them to return to Canada on a commercial carrier.

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Visitors Status

Under IRPA, all visitors to Canada require a temporary resident visa (TRV), except citizens of countries for which an exemption has been granted under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations. A foreign national who wishes to come to Canada, and from a country for which a TRV is imposed, needs to apply at a Canadian Embassy abroad prior to travelling to Canada. The Visitors Status Program aims to ensure that each applicant is screened to determine whether they meet the entry requirements, including that they will abide by the terms and conditions of entry, and are not inadmissible to Canada. The screening of travellers requiring a TRV is carried out by IRCC in cooperation with its federal security partners. Once individuals arrive in Canada, their status needs to be maintained, regardless of whether they needed a visa to enter the country.

The TRV is designed to prevent individuals who would abuse temporary entry from coming to Canada, and to facilitate the entry to Canada of genuine temporary residents. The requirement to obtain a TRV limits the number of immigration violations (refugee claims, no proper travel documents, not leaving Canada once the period of stay has expired, working illegally, etc.) and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 381 347 -34
Spending 57,399,595 42,062,755 -15,336,840
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote 33 Actual Results
Visitors have been screened to ensure they do not pose a risk to the health, safety and security of Canadians 1. Percentage of TRV applications approved/refused Approved: 83%
Refused: 17%
Approved: 82.3%
Refused: 17.7%

2. Percentage of refused TRV applications based on the following grounds:

  1. health
  2. criminality
  3. security
  1. < 0.1%
  2. < 0.1%
  3. < 0.1%
  1. 0.01%
  2. 0.08%
  3. 0.02%
3. Percentage of refugee claims made by persons subject to a TRV requirement relative to TRV approvals 1% 0.4%

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. Of the 1,577,489 TRV applications that were finalized by the Department in 2015, a total of 82.3% were approved and 17.7% were refused.
  2. Of the 279,337 applications that were refused, approximately 0.1% were refused for health, criminality or security reasons, meaning that the other 99.9% of refused applications were refused for other inadmissibilities (such as financial concerns, misrepresentation or non-compliance).
  3. The TRV approval process attempts to ensure that visas are not being sought as a means to reach Canada to make a refugee claim. In 2015, less than 1% of approved TRV applicants went on to make a refugee claim.

Sub-Program 4.2.3: Temporary Resident Permits

Persons seeking temporary residence in Canada who do not meet IRPA requirements are subject to refusal of a TRV abroad, denial of entry at ports of entry, or refusal of extensions inland. In some cases, however, there may be compelling reasons for an officer to issue a temporary resident permit (TRP) to allow a person who is otherwise inadmissible to enter or remain in Canada. Under the TRP Program, designated officers may issue these permits abroad, at a port of entry or in Canada, depending on the circumstances. Grounds for issuance of a TRP include, among others, inadmissibility due to medical reasons, criminality, reasons of security, infringement of human or international rights, or organized crime. TRPs are issued for a limited, often short, period of time and are subject to cancellation at any time. TRPs provide officers with the flexibility to address exceptional circumstances and, in so doing, maintain the integrity of Canada’s immigration program and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 28 16 -12
Spending 2,765,935 1,576,102 -1,189,833
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote 34 Actual Results
People seeking to enter or remain in Canada who would otherwise be inadmissible are granted a TRPFootnote 35 1. Percentage of TRPs issued for security, organized crime, war crimes and/or crimes against humanity 0.75–1.0% 0.1%
2. Percentage of TRPs issued for criminality and/or serious criminality 57.5–62.5% 56.9%
3. Percentage of TRPs issued for other inadmissibilities or non-compliance 38–42% 43%

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, a total of 0.1% of TRPs were issued to individuals who were inadmissible because of security, organized crime, war crimes or crimes against humanity.
  2. IRCC issued 5,883 TRPs for criminality or serious criminality, or 56.9% of all TRPs in 2015, down from 61.2% in 2014. Most TRPs in this category were issued to U.S. citizens with offences such as impaired driving rendering them inadmissible to enter Canada. Additionally, IRCC issued 4,444 TRPs for other inadmissibilities or non-compliance, accounting for approximately 43% of all TRPs in 2015.

Sub-Program 4.2.4: Fraud Prevention and Program Integrity Protection

Under this program, operational policy is developed and procedures are designed in order to maintain confidence in Canada’s citizenship and immigration system and to protect the safety and security of Canada while effectively delivering on economic and social objectives by selecting only those applicants that meet program requirements. Program integrity is achieved through case processing procedures that identify and refuse status to applicants who fail to meet eligibility and/or admissibility requirements, including fraud, and through referral of these cases for enforcement action where appropriate.

Identity management contributes to strengthened program integrity by ensuring that services are delivered to the correct individual, developing efficiencies across multiple business lines, and allowing IRCC to streamline interactions with repeat clientele. Identity management involves the application of procedures to establish, fix and manage client identity across IRCC operations and between key partners based on personal identifiers, identity documents and biometrics identifiers.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 261 258 -3
Spending 47,403,521 41,124,355 -6,279,166
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote 36 Actual Results
The integrity of Canada’s citizenship and immigration programs is assured 1. Percentage of applications processed (as complex or non-complex) for which risk indicator criteriaFootnote 37 have been applied in processing (citizenship, permanent resident (PR), and temporary resident (TR) applications) over total number of applications processed in these lines of business 50% Citizenship: 83%
PR: 50%
(includes PR card)
TR: 0%
2. Percentage of refused cases over the total number of applications processed for Family Class spouses 8% 10.2%
3. Percentage of refused cases over the total number of applications processed for TRVs 16% 17.7%

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015, risk indicator criteria were applied in processing 83% of citizenship applications, which is consistent with results from the previous year. A total of 299,941, or 50%, of PR applications, including PR card applications, had risk indicator criteria applied in processing. This reflects an increase of 40% from the 2014 result due to additional lines of business being triaged in 2015. No TR applications were processed using standard triage criteria during the reporting period, as this work is still under development.
  2. IRCC refused 10.2%, or 4,358, of total spousal applications in 2015, which is a slight decrease from the refusal rate of 11% from the two previous years.
  3. IRCC finalized 1,577,290 TRV applications in 2015 (these include both approved and refused applications), of which 279,337, or approximately 17.7%, were refused. This figure is consistent with the refusal rate from 2014.

Sub-Program 4.2.5: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants

The Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants (GAIM) Program provides transfer payments in the form of contributions to trusted international, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations (such as the International Organization for Migration) to fund activities and support for intercepted irregular migrants, such as meeting basic needs, providing medical care, identifying migrants to be referred to the appropriate authorities for refugee status determination, and facilitating voluntary return and reintegration in the country of origin if determined not to be in need of protection. The GAIM Program responds to the need for Canada to have a permanent program to manage the consequences of disrupting human-smuggling activities believed to be destined for Canada. It is triggered when the Prime Minister’s Special Advisor on Human Smuggling identifies an event involving these activities and IRCC agrees to implement the program. It also addresses the need for complementary activities that demonstrate Canada’s commitment to transit states and international partners that would otherwise be encumbered with the costs of unintended consequences arising from smuggling-prevention activities. Offers of capacity building and support in managing the consequences of successful prevention of human smuggling have been critical in securing bilateral cooperation from transit states. The GAIM Program reflects IRCC’s role in Canada’s whole-of-government strategy to combat human-smuggling activities. The program uses transfer payment funding from the contribution in support of the GAIM Program.

Human Resources (FTEs) and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
Resource Planned
2015-16
Actual
2015-16
Difference
2015-16
FTEs 1 2 1
Spending 91,308 896,739 805,431
Performance Results
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Migrants who are determined not to be refugees reintegrate in their countries of origin 1. Percentage of migrants who received assistance to establish a business who are “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “moderately satisfied” with the performance of their businessFootnote 38 90% N/A
2. Percentage of migrants surveyed who received reintegration assistance who are “positive” about their future in their home country 80% N/A

Performance Indicator Analysis

  1. In 2015-16, due to funding delays resulting in only four months of operation, the performance results for the GAIM Program could not be obtained. However, it was determined through the recent program evaluation that there is an ongoing need for a global voluntary return and reintegration program in order to support the objectives of Canada’s Migrant Smuggling Prevention Strategy. The GAIM Program has been an integral component in meeting these objectives and is well aligned with both Government of Canada and IRCC priorities.

Program 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

As part of its mandate, IRCC aims to influence the international migration and integration policy agenda. This is done by developing and promoting, together with other public policy sectors, Canada’s position on international migration, integration and refugee protection issues, and through participation in multilateral, regional and bilateral forums.

IRCC works closely with partner countries to ensure the effective administration of immigration laws through the exchange of information, including biometric data. This international migration policy development helps Canada advance its interests in the context of international migration as well as meet its international obligations and commitments.

IRCC supports international engagement and partnerships through membership in and contributions to such organizations as the International Organization for Migration, Regional Conference on Migration, the UNHCR Global Forum on Migration and Development, and Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees. The program uses transfer payment funding from the following programs: grant for Migration Policy Development; annual assessed contributions for the International Organization for Migration; and annual assessed contributions for the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance formerly called the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research.

There are no sub-programs for this program.

Program 4.4: Passport

IRCC is accountable for the Passport Program and collaborates with Service Canada and Global Affairs Canada for the delivery of passport services. The program is managed through a revolving fund.Footnote 39 The program enables the issuance of secure Canadian travel documents through authentication of identity and entitlement, facilitates travel, and contributes to international and domestic security.

There are no sub-programs for this program.

Date Modified: