ARCHIVED – Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act 2008-2009

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Part I: The Multiculturalism Program 2008-2009

1.2 Supporting federal institutions

Multiculturalism Champions Network

Launched in 2005, the Multiculturalism Champions Network was established to facilitate greater implementation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act and to encourage the promotion of multiculturalism throughout the federal government. The network is composed of senior officials who play a leadership role in building awareness and understanding of multiculturalism in their respective departments and in developing appropriate policies, programs, services and practices across federal institutions.

The network is composed of senior officials who play a leadership role in building awareness and understanding of multiculturalism in their respective departments and in developing appropriate policies, programs, services and practices across federal institutions.

During the reporting period, the network members came together to share information on best practices, learn about the latest research and interact with each other, with the goal of better equipping their respective institutions to respond to the challenges presented by Canada’s increasingly diverse society.

Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act

In 2009, after a successful pilot program, the Multiculturalism Program implemented a series of workshops designed to assist federal institutions in preparing their report submissions and increase awareness of the obligations that federal institutions have under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act. Changes were also made to the submission process to make it easier for small and large institutions to report. As a result, 122 federal institutions reported on their activities for this reporting period (2008–2009), up from 114 submissions received last year (2007–2008).

Research

Policy makers require up-to-date information and analysis in order to develop and implement policies and programs that respond to the changing needs of Canada’s diverse society. In working with partners in government, academia and the voluntary sector, the Multiculturalism Program responds to this need by producing and disseminating relevant research products and services through publications, seminars and conferences.

Publications produced during the reporting period targeted important issues, such as racial and religious discrimination, youth radicalization and engagement, the socio-economic conditions of visible and religious minorities, and multicultural common spaces.

Of particular note is the report entitled The Current State of Multiculturalism in Canada and Research Themes on Canadian Multiculturalism 2008–2010 produced by Professor Will Kymlicka (Queen’s University). Commissioned by the Multiculturalism Program, this report was grounded in research from leading academics and practitioners across Canada and informed the Program’s research agenda for 2008–2010. The ten multiculturalism research themes identified were the following:

  • Adapting Multiculturalism to Religious Diversity
  • Racism and Discrimination
  • Labour Market Integration
  • Immigration Beyond the Metropolis
  • Implications of Security Issues for Multiculturalism
  • The Future of Multiculturalism
  • Relating Multiculturalism to Aboriginal Peoples
  • Vulnerable Groups: Women and Youth/Second Generation
  • Patterns of Ethnic Community Formation
  • Multiculturalism Readiness in Service Delivery
Metropolis Project

The Multiculturalism Program also supports the Metropolis Project in various research and outreach initiatives and special events. This included brown bag presentations on Multiculturalism Myth Busting and Multicultural Common Spaces. The Program also engaged academics, practitioners and policy makers in workshops and plenary sessions on religious diversity and second-generation issues at the National Metropolis Conference in Calgary, Alberta, in March 2009.

The Multiculturalism Program worked to advance important research dialogues at the international level during the reporting period. In October 2008, the Program brought together academics, civil society representatives and officials at the 13th International Metropolis Conference in Bonn, Germany, to explore different public strategies for intercultural and interfaith dialogue and to identify best practices of interest in the Canadian context.

Find out more about the Metropolis Project.

 

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