Access to Information Act,
Privacy Act

Annual Report
2013–2014


Table of Contents


Part One: Access to Information Act

Introduction

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) is pleased to present to Parliament its 20th annual report on the administration of the Access to Information Act for the fiscal year commencing April 1, 2013, and ending March 31, 2014.

The purpose of the Access to Information Act is to provide a right of access to information in records under the control of a government institution. The Act maintains that government information should be available to the public that necessary exceptions to the right of access should be limited and specific, and that decisions on the disclosure of government information should be reviewed independently of government.

Section 72 of the Act requires the head of every federal government institution to submit an annual report to Parliament on the administration of the Act during the fiscal year. This report outlines CIC’s accomplishments in carrying out its access to information responsibilities and obligations during the 2013–2014 reporting period.

About Citizenship and Immigration Canada

CIC was created in 1994 to link citizenship registration and immigration services, to promote the unique ideals all Canadians share and to help build a stronger Canada. In November 2008, the Department’s portfolio was expanded to include multiculturalism. In addition, effective July 2, 2013, primary responsibility for the Passport program and the administration of the Canadian Passport Order and the Order Respecting the Issuance of Diplomatic and Special Passports were transferred from the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD) to CIC.

Canada has a proud tradition of welcoming immigrants. Our immigration and refugee systems and our vast network of organizations that help newcomers settle and integrate are among the best in the world. This tradition is enhanced by the value we place on multiculturalism, which is fundamental to our belief that all citizens are equal. Multiculturalism aims to ensure that all citizens, regardless of their ethnocultural community, have equal opportunities and feel they belong in Canada. Through multiculturalism, new Canadians are encouraged to integrate into Canadian society and to take an active part in its social, cultural, economic and political affairs.

CIC’s mandate comes from the shared jurisdiction of section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867, the Citizenship Act, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Canadian Passport Order and the Order Respecting the Issuance of Diplomatic and Special Passports.

CIC’s work encompasses a broad range of activities, including the following:

  • facilitating the arrival of people and their integration into Canadian life in a way that maximizes their contribution to the country while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians;
  • maintaining Canada’s humanitarian tradition by protecting refugees and other people in need of protection;
  • enhancing the values and promoting the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship;
  • administering the Canadian Passport Order;
  • reaching out to all Canadians, and fostering increased intercultural understanding and an integrated society with equal opportunity for all regardless of race, ethnicity and religion; and
  • advancing global migration policies in a way that supports Canada’s immigration and humanitarian objectives.

Access to Information and Privacy Division

The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Division is part of the Corporate Affairs Branch in the Corporate Services Sector. The Division administers the Access to Information Act and is led by a director who acts as the ATIP Coordinator for the Department. Three units carry out the Division’s work: Operations and Fast Track; Complex Cases and Issues; and Policy, Training and Projects. Each unit’s manager reports to the director.

The ATIP Division receives, coordinates and processes requests for information under the Access to Information Act, providing high-quality and timely service to requesters. The Division also coordinates requests made under the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty.

CIC maintains a network of 33 ATIP liaison officers who represent the branches and regions of the Department. The ATIP liaison officers provide assistance by searching, collecting records and presenting recommendations in relation to requests.

Activities and Accomplishments

I. Performance

For another consecutive year, CIC received more Access to Information (ATI) requests than any other federal institution. A total of 29,281 ATI requests were received in the 2013–2014 fiscal year, which represents an increase of 17 percent from the previous year and breaks another record in ATIP’s history. Although faced with a significant increase in volume, the Department processed 27,407 requests and maintained a high compliance rate of 86.23 percent.

II. Leadership

In the ATIP field, CIC is recognized as a pioneer. As part of the Open Government initiative, CIC was the lead department in the development of an ATIP Online Request tool for ATI and Privacy requests. The ATIP Online Request was launched on April 9, 2013, with three partner departments: CIC, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) and Shared Services Canada. Throughout the fiscal year, an additional 11 institutions joined the online portal. It is anticipated that a total of 30 institutions will be part of the Open Government initiative in 2014–2015.

Not only did the online portal improve CIC’s work efficiency in processing ATI requests, it helped the Division move to an almost entirely paperless environment. This initiative also contributed to the modernization of the ATIP service to the public, which is a key commitment of the Open Information pillar of Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government.

These best practices in improving and modernizing ATIP operations will continue in 2014–2015 and beyond.

III. Promotion, Awareness and Training

During the fiscal year, the ATIP Division offered a series of training and awareness sessions (in class and online) to over 500 CIC employees across Canada and abroad. This includes specialized in class training sessions to reinforce the importance of reporting privacy breaches as well as employees’ role as public servants to protect an individual’s privacy.

In addition, as part of ATIP’s mandate, the Division continued to promote ATIP awareness through a tutorial video and to maintain up to date ATIP-related information onto CIC’s internal website.

IV. Policies, Guidelines and Procedures

During the 2013–2014 reporting period, the ATIP Division continued to improve internal processes and procedures to streamline its operations. To meet the ever-increasing volume of requests, the Division reviewed and improved its workflow to ensure a high compliance rate.

In addition, the Division continues to demonstrate its commitment to assist CIC in meeting its legislative requirements by providing timely and professional internal service for policy advice and guidance. The Division also ensures that the service standards are reviewed and updated regularly to reflect new circumstances.

V. Horizontal and Collaborative Engagement

In response to Canada’s Open Government strategy, CIC maintained its commitment to horizontal and collaborative engagement to share and disseminate advice and ideas as well as best practices. In 2013–2014, as a leader in the ATIP field, CIC continued to participate in several initiatives to improve and modernize the administration of ATIP across the federal government.

Highlights include the following:

  • Interdepartmental ATIP Online Request tool;
  • Passport Canada’s transition from the DFATD to a co-managed program between CIC and Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)/Service Canada;
  • Information sharing agreements; and
  • Online summaries of completed ATI requests.

Through formal and informal consultations, CIC continued to collaborate and share best practices with various organizations, such as the Canada Border Services Agency, the Canada Revenue Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the DFATD, Public Works and Government Services Canada, ESDC and the TBS.

VI. Passport Transition

Effective July 2, 2013, the primary responsibility for the Passport program was transferred to CIC. A Passport Transition Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was developed and signed between ESDC and CIC.

In relation to ATIP, during the transition period, the Passport program continued to use separate ATIP request tracking and processing systems. This was done to ensure consistency throughout the transition. As of 2014–2015, all Passport program requests will be processed through regular CIC ATIP channels. Since CIC and Passport program used separate processing systems of ATIP requests, two statistical overview reports are provided.

VII. Human Resources

CIC continues to invest in the federal government’s ATIP community by developing the required knowledge and expertise to meet the growing demand. To help build its capacity, CIC continues to provide ongoing training for employees to acquire additional knowledge in the ATIP field and hires full-time students through the Federal Student Work Experience Program.

VII. External Views

Treasury Board Secretariat Management Accountability Framework Assessment Extracts Related to Access to Information

CIC was not evaluated by the TBS on the “Effectiveness of Information Management” stream for 2013–2014 as a part of the Management Accountability Framework assessment.

CIC’s Statistical Overview

I. Requests Received Under the Access to Information Act

CIC continues to be the most accessed federal institution, receiving an unprecedented 29,281 requests under the Access to Information Act between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014. This total represents an increase of nearly 17 percent from the previous reporting period. The number of requests received by the Department has more than doubled in the past seven years. As noted above, CIC is addressing the increase in volume by continuing to improve efficiencies in order to respond to requests within the legislative time frame.

Access to information act requests received and completed
Text version: Access to information requests received and completed
Year Requests Received Requests Completed
2007–2008 11,434 11,600
2008–2009 14,034 13,616
2009–2010 16,647 16,556
2010–2011 18,862 18,070
2011–2012 20,575 20,891
2012-2013 25,010 26,020
2013-2014 29,281 27,407

The majority of ATI requests CIC received were for personal information files.

CIC - Most accessed department
Text version: CIC - Most accessed deparment
Department 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014
CIC 20,575 25,010 29,281
DND 1,645 2,044 2,231
CRA 2,237 3,138 2,751
CBSA 1,866 3,147 4,671

In 2013–2014, CIC reviewed over 1,241,427 pages, representing an overall decrease of 16 percent since last fiscal year. The Department’s increased use of a single electronic system for the processing of immigration and citizenship cases has allowed for the centralization of information within CIC. This system produces a complete and concise report that presents all the information about cases, which resulted in the decrease of pages required to be processed.

Pages reviewed
Text version: Pages reviewed
Year Pages Reviewed
2013-2014 1,241,427
2012-2013 1,471,572
2011-2012 1,359,642
2010-2011 1,147,709
2009-2010 983,765

II. Sources of Requests

The business sector (primarily made up of immigration consultants and lawyers) is the largest source of requests, accounting for 57 percent of all requests. The general public accounts for 36 percent of requests. The remaining 7 percent consist of media, academia and other organizations.

Sources of access to information Requests
Text version: Sources of access to information requests
Sources of Access to Information Requests Amount
Business 16,568
Public 10,643
Media, Academia & Organizations 2,070

III. Disposition of Completed Requests

In 2013–2014, CIC completed 27,407 requests. The ATIP Division put in place various measures such as weekly briefing sessions with senior management to monitor the intake of requests and to ensure that requests are processed within the legislative time frame.

In 9,143 cases (33 percent), CIC provided all the information requested. In 15,659 requests (57 percent), the Department invoked exemptions. The remaining 2,605 requests had no records that existed or the request was transferred, abandoned or treated informally.

IV. Exemptions Invoked

The majority of exemptions CIC invoked fell under three sections of the Access to Information Act:

  • Subsection 19(1), which protects personal information, was used in 11,057 cases (40 percent);
  • Subsection 15(1), which covers international relations, defence and subversive activities, was used in 7,740 cases (28 percent); and
  • Subsection 16(1), which addresses law enforcement and criminal investigations, was used in 2,471 cases (9 percent).

It should be noted that more than one section can be applied to a specific request.

V. Consultations

In addition to processing requests received directly under the Access to Information Act, CIC was consulted by other federal government institutions in 204 cases where the records under the control of these institutions related to CIC activities.

VI. Extensions

Section 9 of the Access to Information Act allows an extension of statutory time limits if consultations are necessary or if the request is for a large volume of records and processing it within the original time limit would unreasonably interfere with the operations of the Department.

CIC invoked a total of 1,483 extensions during the 2013–2014 reporting period. Extensions were required in 193 instances when CIC consulted with other federal institutions prior to responding. Extensions were required in 1,273 instances to search through a large volume of records. The Department also invoked 17 extensions to conduct third party notifications.

VII. Completion Time

CIC responded to 18,417 requests (67 percent) within 30 days or less and a further 6,502 requests (24 percent) within 31 to 60 days. The Department completed 1,754 requests (6 percent) within 61 to 120 days and 734 requests (3 percent) required 121 days or more to complete.

Access to information requests completion time
Text version: Access to information requests completion time
Completion times Percentage
Within 30 days or less 67
31 to 60 days 24
61 to 120 days 6
121 days or more 3

VIII. Complaints

During the 2013–2014 reporting period, the Department was notified of 305 complaints received by the Office of the Information Commissioner (OIC), which represents 1 percent of all requests completed during this period. The majority of complaints were related to processing times and extensions.

During the reporting period, 148 complaint investigations were completed. Of these, 21 were abandoned, discontinued or deemed to be unfounded, and the remaining 127 complaints were resolved to the satisfaction of the requester.

IX. Appeals to the Federal Court

One appeal to the Federal Court was filed against CIC regarding the Access to Information Act during the 2013–2014 reporting period. A decision has yet to be rendered.

Passport Program Statistical Overview

I. Requests Received Under the Access to Information Act

Between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014, the Passport program received 46 requests under the Access to Information Act, which is a 34 percent decrease from the previous reporting period.

II. Sources of Requests

The public sector is the largest source of requests, accounting for 67 percent of all requests

III. Disposition of Completed Requests

In 2013–2014, the Passport program completed 49 requests. In 12 cases (24 percent), all the information requested was released. In 21 cases (43 percent), exemptions were invoked. The remaining 16 cases had no records that existed or the request was transferred, abandoned or treated informally.

The Passport program reviewed 8,155 pages, representing an overall decrease of three percent since last fiscal year.

IV. Exemptions and Exclusions Invoked

The majority of exemptions that the Passport program invoked fall under four sections of the Access to Information Act:

  • Subsection 19(1) [personal information] was used in 12 cases (24 percent);
  • Section 23 [solicitor-client privilege] was used in 4 cases (8 percent);
  • Section 22 [testing procedures, tests and audits] was used in 2 cases (4 percent); and
  • Subsection 16(1), which addresses law enforcement and criminal investigation, was used in 7 cases (14 percent).

The Passport program did not apply any exclusion during the reporting period.

V. Extensions

During the reporting period, the Passport program invoked one extension under paragraph 9(1)(a) and seven extensions under paragraph 9(1)(b). One extension was for 30 days or less, five were for between 31 and 60 days, and one was for between 121 and 180 days.

VI. Consultations

Between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014, the Passport program received 26 Access to Information Act consultation requests from other federal government institutions.

VII. Complaints

During the reporting period, the Passport program was notified of six complaints received by the OIC. Two complaints were deemed to be well founded and four are still under investigation.

Appendix A: CIC’s Report on the Access to Information Act

Statistical Report on the Access to Information Act

Name of institution: Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Reporting period: 01/04/2013 to 31/03/2014

Part 1 – Requests under the Access to Information Act
1.1 Number of Requests
Requests Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 29281
Outstanding from previous reporting period 1223
Total 30504
Closed during reporting period 27407
Carried over to next reporting period 3097
1.2 Sources of requests
Source Number of Requests
Media 372
Academia 782
Business (Private Sector) 16568
Organization 916
Public 10643
Total 29281
Part 2 - Requests closed during the reporting period
2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 348 6225 2098 388 45 35 4 9143
Disclosed in part 428 9431 4132 1209 214 173 14 15601
All exempted 7 12 5 4 1 0 1 27
All excluded 6 17 7 0 1 0 0 31
No records exist 631 367 146 87 32 41 0 1304
Request transferred 16 2 1 0 0 0 0 19
Request abandoned 811 104 110 66 49 109 15 1264
Treated informally 9 6 3 0 0 0 0 18
Total 2253 16164 6502 1754 342 358 34 27407
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of requests
13(1)(a) 91
13(1)(b) 22
13(1)(c) 6
13(1)(d) 8
13(1)(e) 0
14(a) 25
14(b) 6
15(1) - I.A.Table note a 704
15(1) - Def.Table note b 611
15(1) - S.A.Table note c 6425
16(1)(a)(i) 7
16(1)(a)(ii) 7
16(1)(a)(iii) 1
16(1)(b) 38
16(1)(c) 2418
16(1)(d) 0
16(2)(a) 3
16(2)(b) 1
16(2)(c) 16
16(3) 0
16.1(1)(a) 0
16.1(1)(b) 1
16.1(1)(c) 17
16.1(1)(d) 0
16.2(1) 0
16.3 0
16.4(1)(a) 0
16.4(1)(b) 0
16.5 0
17 13
18(a) 1
18(b) 0
18(c) 0
18(d) 0
18.1(1)(a) 0
18.1(1)(b) 0
18.1(1)(c) 0
18.1(1)(d) 0
19(1) 11057
20(1)(a) 1
20(1)(b) 14
20(1)(b.1) 0
20(1)(c) 8
20(1)(d) 1
20.1 0
20.2 0
20.4 0
21(1)(a) 121
21(1)(b) 132
21(1)(c) 12
21(1)(d) 22
22 176
22.1(1) 0
23 67
24(1) 7
26 23

Table note

Table note a

I.A.: International Affairs

Return to note a referrer

Table note b

Def.: Defence of Canada

Return to note b referrer

Table note c

S.A.: Subversive Activities

Return to note c referrer

2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of requests
68(a) 28
68(b) 0
68(c) 0
68.1 28
68.2(a) 28
68.2(b) 28
69(1)(a) 2
69(1)(b) 0
69(1)(c) 0
69(1)(d) 0
69(1)(e) 5
69(1)(f) 0
69(1)(g) re (a) 6
69(1)(g) re (b) 6
69(1)(g) re (c) 6
69(1)(g) re (d) 6
69(1)(g) re (e) 6
69(1)(g) re (f) 6
69.1(1) 0
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 528 9070 0
Disclosed in part 1378 15101 0
Total 1906 24171 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 268269 244842 9143
Disclosed in part 957149 484394 15601
All exempted 413 0 27
All excluded 290 0 31
Request abandoned 15306 2255 1264
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Up to 100 pages processed 101-500 pages processed 501-1000 pages processed 1001-5000 pages processed More than 5000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 8912 201397 215 32380 11 3826 5 7239 0 0
Disclosed in part 13840 112944 1588 249757 136 73534 36 42582 1 5577
All exempted 27 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 30 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 1244 1161 15 1032 2 12 3 50 0 0
Total 24053 315502 1819 283169 149 77372 44 49871 1 5577
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Assessment of fees Legal advice sought Other Total
All disclosed 102 5 0 8945 9052
Disclosed in part 420 3 3 15257 15683
All exempted 14 0 0 1 15
All excluded 1 0 0 7 8
Abandoned 21 0 0 377 398
Total 558 8 3 24587 25156

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
3813 3418 58 337 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 1846 186 2032
16 to 30 days 413 57 470
31 to 60 days 384 79 463
61 to 120 days 347 69 416
121 to 180 days 153 39 192
181 to 365 days 153 68 221
More than 365 days 4 15 19
Total 3300 513 3813
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0
Part 3 - Extensions
3.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 9(1)(a)
Interference with operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third party notice
Section 69 Other
All disclosed 295 0 14 2
Disclosed in part 919 6 157 14
All exempted 0 0 4 0
All excluded 1 0 0 0
No records exist 53 0 1 0
Request abandoned 5 0 11 1
Total 1273 6 187 17
3.2 Length of extensions
Length of extensions 9(1)(a)
Interference with operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third party notice
Section 69 Other
30 days or less 57 1 40 3
31 to 60 days 1247 0 66 10
61 to 120 days 4 0 52 3
121 to 180 days 8 5 22 1
181 to 365 days 5 0 7 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0 0
Total 1321 6 187 17
Part 4 – Fees
Fee Type Fee Collected Fee Waived or Refunded
Number of requests Amount Number of requests Amount
Application 26971 $136,045 420 $2,195
Search 1 $145 0 $0
Production 0 $0 0 $0
Programming 0 $0 0 $0
Preparation 0 $0 0 $0
Alternative format 0 $0 0 $0
Reproduction 0 $0 0 $0
Total 26972 $136,190 420 $2,195
Part 5 - Consultations received from other institutions and organizations
5.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
Consultations Other government institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during reporting period 178 5872 11 169
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 15 755 0 0
Total 193 6627 11 169
Closed during the reporting period 192 6511 8 134
Pending at the end of the reporting period 1 116 3 35
5.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 25 27 55 12 3 0 0 122
Disclose in part 10 8 16 9 1 0 0 44
Exempt entirely 1 4 0 1 0 0 0 6
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 5
Other 11 0 2 2 0 0 0 15
Total 50 40 74 24 4 0 0 192
5.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 6
Disclose in part 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Total 4 2 2 0 0 0 0 8
Part 6 – Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences
Number of days Number of responses received Number of responses received past deadline
1 to 15 0 0
16 to 30 0 0
31 to 60 1 1
61 to 120 0 0
121 to 180 2 1
181 to 365 5 5
More than 365 0 0
Total 8 7
Part 7 - Resources related to the Access to Information Act
7.1 Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries $1,951,792
Overtime $139,500

Goods and Services

Professional services contracts ($226,424)

Other ($69,843)

$296,267
Total $2,387,559
7.2 Human Resources
Resources Dedicated full-time to ATI activities Dedicated part-time to ATI activities Total
Full-time employees 26.43 0.00 26.43
Part-time and casual employees 6.40 1.31 7.71
Regional staff 0.00 0.00 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.00 0.00 0.00
Students 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 32.83 1.31 34.14

Appendix B: Passport Program Report on the Access to Information Act

Statistical Report on the Access to Information Act

Name of institution: Passport Canada

Reporting period: 01/04/2013 to 31/03/2014

Part 1 – Requests under the Access to Information Act
1.1 Number of Requests
Requests Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 46
Outstanding from previous reporting period 5
Total 51
Closed during reporting period 49
Carried over to next reporting period 2
1.2 Sources of requests
Source Number of Requests
Media 9
Academia 1
Business (Private Sector) 3
Organization 2
Public 31
Total 46
Part 2 - Requests closed during the reporting period
2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 6 5 1 0 0 0 0 12
Disclosed in part 4 9 3 4 0 1 0 21
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Request transferred 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Request abandoned 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 9
Treated informally 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 25 15 4 4 0 1 0 49
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of requests
13(1)(a) 1
13(1)(b) 1
13(1)(c) 0
13(1)(d) 0
13(1)(e) 0
14(a) 0
14(b) 0
15(1) - I.A.Table note d 3
15(1) - Def.Table note e 0
15(1) - S.A.Table note f 0
16(1)(a)(i) 1
16(1)(a)(ii) 2
16(1)(a)(iii) 0
16(1)(b) 1
16(1)(c) 3
16(1)(d) 0
16(2)(a) 2
16(2)(b) 0
16(2)(c) 3
16(3) 0
16.1(1)(a) 0
16.1(1)(b) 0
16.1(1)(c) 0
16.1(1)(d) 0
16.2(1) 0
16.3 0
16.4(1)(a) 0
16.4(1)(b) 0
16.5 0
17 0
18(a) 0
18(b) 0
18(c) 0
18(d) 0
18.1(1)(a) 0
18.1(1)(b) 0
18.1(1)(c) 0
18.1(1)(d) 0
19(1) 12
20(1)(a) 0
20(1)(b) 1
20(1)(b.1) 0
20(1)(c) 4
20(1)(d) 0
20.1 0
20.2 0
20.4 0
21(1)(a) 0
21(1)(b) 0
21(1)(c) 0
21(1)(d) 0
22 2
22.1(1) 0
23 4
24(1) 0
26 0

Table note

Table note d

I.A.: International Affairs

Return to note d referrer

Table note e

Def.: Defence of Canada

Return to note e referrer

Table note f

S.A.: Subversive Activities

Return to note f referrer


2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of requests
68(a) 0
68(b) 0
68(c) 0
68.1 0
68.2(a) 0
68.2(b) 0
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69(1)(c) 0
69(1)(d) 0
69(1)(e) 0
69(1)(f) 0
69(1)(g) re (a) 0
69(1)(g) re (b) 0
69(1)(g) re (c) 0
69(1)(g) re (d) 0
69(1)(g) re (e) 0
69(1)(g) re (f) 0
69.1(1) 0
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 11 1 0
Disclosed in part 19 2 0
Total 30 3 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 826 826 12
Disclosed in part 7329 3540 21
All exempted 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 9
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Up to 100 pages processed 101-500 pages processed 501-1000 pages processed 1001-5000 pages processed More than 5000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 10 207 2 619 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 17 642 2 288 1 495 0 0 1 2115
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 36 849 4 907 1 495 0 0 1 2115
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Assessment of fees Legal advice sought Other Total
All disclosed 1 0 0 0 1
Disclosed in part 8 1 0 0 9
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 0 0 0 0 0
Total 9 1 0 0 10

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
1 0 0 0 1
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 1 0 1
16 to 30 days 0 0 0
31 to 60 days 0 0 0
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 1 0 1
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0
Part 3 – Extensions
3.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 9(1)(a)
Interference with operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third party notice
Section 69 Other
All disclosed 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 1 0 7 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0
Total 1 0 7 0
3.2 Length of extensions
Length of extensions 9(1)(a)
Interference with operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third party notice
Section 69 Other
30 days or less 0 0 1 0
31 to 60 days 0 0 5 0
61 to 120 days 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 1 0 1 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0 0
Total 1 0 7 0
Part 4 – Fees
Fee Type Fee Collected Fee Waived or Refunded
Number of requests Amount Number of requests Amount
Application 50 $215 0 0
Search 1 $1,440 0 0
Production 1 $108 0 0
Programming 0 $0 0 0
Preparation 0 $0 0 0
Alternative format 0 $0 0 0
Reproduction 0 $0 0 0
Total 52 $1,763 0 0
Part 5 – Consultations received from other institutions and organizations
5.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
Consultations Other government institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during reporting period 26 424 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 26 424 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 24 416 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 2 8 0 0
5.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 12 2 0 0 0 0 0 14
Disclose in part 8 2 0 0 0 0 0 10
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 20 4 0 0 0 0 0 24
5.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Part 6 – Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences
Number of days Number of responses received Number of responses received past deadline
1 to 15 0 0
16 to 30 0 0
31 to 60 0 0
61 to 120 0 0
121 to 180 0 0
181 to 365 0 0
More than 365 0 0
Total 0 0
Part 7 - Resources related to the Access to Information Act
7.1 Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries $23,475
Overtime $0

Goods and Services

Professional services contracts ($0)

Other ($0)

$0
Total $23,475
7.2 Human Resources
Resources Dedicated full-time to ATI activities Dedicated part-time to ATI activities Total
Full-time employees 0.00 1.00 1.00
Part-time and casual employees 0.00 0.00 0.00
Regional staff 0.00 0.00 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.00 0.00 0.00
Students 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 0.00 1.00 1.00

Appendix C: Delegation Order

Delegation of Authority under the Access to Information Act and the Access to Information Regulations

Access to Information Act – Position/Title Footnote 1
Descriptions Section 1 – DM 2 – ADM–CS/
DGCA
3 – ATIP/
DIR
4 – ATIP/
M–CCI
5 – ATIP/
M–PM–05/
SUP–PM–04
6 – ATIP/
PM–05
7 – ATIP/
PM–04
8 – ATIP/
PM–03
Notice where access granted 7 yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Transfer of request 8(1) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Extension of time limits 9(1) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Notice of extension to Commissioner 9(2) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Notice where access refused 10(1) & (2) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Payment of additional fees 11(2) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Payment of fees for EDP record 11(3) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Deposit 11(4) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Notice of fee payment 11(5) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Waiver or refund of fees 11(6) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Translation 12(2) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Conversion to alternate format 12(3) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Information obtained in confidence 13 yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – federal-provincial affairs 14 yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – international affairs, defence 15(1) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – law enforcement and investigation 16(1) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – security information 16(2) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – policing services for provinces or municipalities 16(3) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – safety of individuals 17 yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – economic interests of Canada 18 yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – another person’s information 19(1) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Disclose personal information 19(2) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Refuse access – third party information 20(1) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Disclose testing methods 20(2) & (3) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Disclose third party information 20(5) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Disclose in public interest 20(6) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – advice, etc. 21 yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – tests and audits 22 yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – solicitor-client privilege 23 yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – prohibited information 24(1) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Disclose severed information 25 yes yes yes yes yes yes no no
Refuse access – information to be published 26 yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Notice to third parties 27(1) yes yes yes yes yes yes no no
Extension of time limit 27(4) yes yes yes yes yes yes no no
Notice of third party disclosure 28(1) yes yes yes yes yes yes no no
Representation to be made in writing 28(2) yes yes yes yes yes yes no no
Disclosure of record 28(4) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Disclosure on Commissioner’s recommendation 29(1) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Notice of intention to investigate 32 yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Notice to third party 33 yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Right to make representations 35(2) yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Findings and recommendations of the Information Commissioner 37(1)(b) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Access given to complainant 37(4) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Notice to third party of court action 43(1) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Notice to person who requested record 44(2) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Special rules for hearings 52(2) yes yes yes yes no no no no
Ex parte representations 52(3) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Exempt information may be excluded 71(2) yes yes yes yes yes no no no
Access to Information Act – Position/Title Footnote 1
Descriptions Section 1 – DM 2 – ADM–CS/
DGCA
3 – ATIP/
DIR
4 – ATIP/
M–CCI
5 – ATIP/
M–PM–05/
SUP–PM–04
6 – ATIP/
PM–05
7 – ATIP/
PM–04
8 – ATIP/
PM–03
Transfer of requests 6 yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
Examination of records 8 yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes

Legend

DM
Deputy Minister
ADMCS/DGCA
ADM, Corporate Services / Director General, Corporate Affairs
ATIP/DIR
Director, Access to Information and Privacy (EX-01)
ATIP/MCCI
Manager, Complex Cases and Issues, ATIP (PM-06)
ATIP/MPM05/
SUPPM04
Managers, Operations and Fast Track, ATIP (PM-05) / Supervisor, Fast Track (PM-04)
ATIP/PM05
Senior ATIP Administrators, ATIP (PM-05)
ATIP/PM04
ATIP Administrators, ATIP (PM-04)
ATIP/PM03
ATIP Officers, ATIP (PM-03)

Part Two: Privacy Act

Introduction

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) is pleased to present to Parliament its 20th annual report on the administration of the Privacy Act for the fiscal year commencing April 1, 2013, and ending March 31, 2014.

The purpose of the Privacy Act is to provide a right of access to information in records under the control of a government institution. The Act maintains that government information should be available to the public that necessary exceptions to the right of access should be limited and specific, and that decisions on the disclosure of government information should be reviewed independently of government.

Section 72 of the Act requires the head of every federal government institution to submit an annual report to Parliament on the administration of the Act during the fiscal year. This report outlines CIC’s accomplishments in carrying out its privacy responsibilities and obligations during the 2013–2014 reporting period.

About Citizenship and Immigration Canada

CIC was created in 1994 to link citizenship registration and immigration services, to promote the unique ideals all Canadians share and to help build a stronger Canada. In November 2008, the Department’s portfolio was expanded to include multiculturalism. In addition, effective July 2, 2013, primary responsibility for the Passport program and the administration of the Canadian Passport Order and the Order Respecting the Issuance of Diplomatic and Special Passports were transferred from the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD) to CIC.

Canada has a proud tradition of welcoming immigrants. Our immigration and refugee systems and our vast network of organizations that help newcomers settle and integrate are among the best in the world. This tradition is enhanced by the value we place on multiculturalism, which is fundamental to our belief that all citizens are equal. Multiculturalism aims to ensure that all citizens, regardless of their ethnocultural community, have equal opportunities and feel they belong in Canada. Through multiculturalism, new Canadians are encouraged to integrate into Canadian society and to take an active part in its social, cultural, economic and political affairs.

CIC’s mandate comes from the shared jurisdiction of section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867, the Citizenship Act, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Canadian Passport Order and the Order Respecting the Issuance of Diplomatic and Special Passports.

CIC’s work encompasses a broad range of activities, including:

  • facilitating the arrival of people and their integration into Canadian life in a way that maximizes their contribution to the country while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians;
  • maintaining Canada’s humanitarian tradition by protecting refugees and other people in need of protection;
  • enhancing the values and promoting the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship;
  • administering the Canadian Passport Order;
  • reaching out to all Canadians, and fostering increased intercultural understanding and an integrated society with equal opportunity for all regardless of race, ethnicity and religion; and
  • advancing global migration policies in a way that supports Canada’s immigration and humanitarian objectives.

Access to Information and Privacy Division

CIC is stepping up the pace of modernizing the way it works in continuing to streamline its programs and operations. In 2012–2013, as part of the restructuring of CIC’s presence across the country, CIC centralized the processing of Privacy requests, including requests from investigative bodies at National Headquarters in Ottawa. This restructuring resulted in improving service to the public. Privacy requests will be processed more quickly and more consistently. The Division also coordinates requests made under the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty.

The ATIP Division is part of the Corporate Affairs Branch in the Corporate Services Sector. The Division administers the Privacy Act and is led by a director who acts as the ATIP Coordinator for the Department. Three units carry out the Division’s work: Operations and Fast Track; Complex Cases and Issues; Fast Track; and Policy, Training and Projects. Each unit’s manager reports to the director.

CIC maintains a network of 33 ATIP coordinators who represent the branches and regions of the Department. The ATIP coordinators provide assistance by searching, collecting records and presenting recommendations in relation to requests.

Activities and Accomplishments

I. Performance

In the 2013–2014 fiscal year, CIC received 9,961 privacy requests: a 94 percent increase from the previous reporting period.

In the ATIP field, CIC is recognized as a pioneer. As part of the Open Government initiative, CIC was the lead department in the development of an ATIP Online Request tool for ATI and Privacy requests. The ATIP Online Request was launched on April 9, 2013, with three partner departments: CIC, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) and Shared Services Canada. Throughout the fiscal year, an additional 11 institutions joined the online portal. It is anticipated that a total of 30 institutions will be part of the Open Government initiative in 2014–2015.

Not only did the online portal improve CIC’s efficiency in processing access to information (ATI) requests, it helped the Division move to an almost entirely paperless environment. This initiative also contributed to the modernization of the ATIP service to the public, which is a key commitment of the Open Information pillar of Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government.

These best practices in improving and modernizing ATIP operations will continue in 2014–2015 and beyond.

II. Promotion, Awareness and Training

During the fiscal year, the ATIP Division offered a series of training and awareness sessions (in class and online) to over 500 CIC employees across Canada and abroad. This includes specialized in class training sessions to reinforce the importance of reporting privacy breaches as well as employees’ role as public servants to protect an individual’s privacy.

In addition, as part of ATIP’s mandate, the Division continued to promote ATIP awareness through a tutorial video and to maintain up to date ATIP-related information onto CIC’s internal website.

III. Policies, Guidelines and Procedures

During the 2013–2014 reporting period, the ATIP Division continued to improve internal processes and procedures to streamline its operations. To meet the ever-increasing volume of requests, the Division reviewed and improved its workflow to ensure a high compliance rate.

A more comprehensive handbook regarding the roles and responsibilities in reporting privacy breaches was developed and implemented throughout CIC. This new tool has improved the reporting of privacy breaches to the Department and respects the guidelines set forth by TBS and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC).

In addition, the Division continues to demonstrate its commitment to assist CIC in meeting its legislative requirements by providing timely and professional internal service for policy advice and guidance. The Division also ensures that the service standards are reviewed and updated regularly to reflect new circumstances.

IV. Horizontal and Collaborative Engagement

In response to Canada’s Open Government strategy, CIC maintained its commitment to horizontal and collaborative engagement to share and disseminate advice and ideas as well as best practices. In 2013–2014, as a leader in the ATIP field, CIC continued to participate in several initiatives to improve and modernize the administration of ATIP across the federal government.

Highlights include the following:

  • Interdepartmental ATIP Online Request tool;
  • Passport Canada’s transition from DFATD to co-managed program between CIC and Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)/Service Canada;
  • Information sharing agreements; and
  • Online summaries of completed ATI requests.

Through formal and informal consultations, CIC continued to collaborate and share best practices with various organizations, such as the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the Canada Revenue Agency, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, DFATD, Public Works and Government Services Canada, ESDC and the TBS.

V. Passport Transition

Effective July 2, 2013, the primary responsibility for the Passport program was transferred to CIC. A Passport Transition Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was developed and signed between ESDC and CIC.

In relation to ATIP, during the transition period, the Passport program continued to use separate ATIP request tracking and processing systems. This was done to ensure consistency throughout the transition. As of 2014–2015, all Passport program requests will be processed through regular CIC ATIP channels. Since CIC and the Passport program used separate processing systems for ATIP requests, two statistical overview reports are provided.

VI. Human Resources

CIC continues to invest in the federal government’s ATIP community by developing the required knowledge and expertise to meet growing demand. To help build its capacity, CIC continues to provide ongoing training for employees to acquire additional knowledge in the ATIP field and hires full-time students through the Federal Student Work Experience Program.

VII. External Views

Treasury Board Secretariat Management Accountability Framework Assessment Extracts Related to Access to Information

As part of the Management Accountability Framework assessment, CIC was not evaluated by the TBS on the “Effectiveness of Information Management” stream for 2012-2013.

CIC’s Statistical Overview

I. Requests Received Under the Privacy Act

Between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014, CIC received 9,961 requests under the Privacy Act. This represents an increase of 95 percent from the previous reporting period.

II. Disposition of Completed Requests

In 2013–2014, CIC completed 9,225 requests. The ATIP Division put in place various measures such as weekly briefing sessions with senior management to monitor the intake of requests and to ensure that requests are processed within the legislative time frame.

In 2,009 cases (22 percent), CIC provided all the information requested. For 5,832 requests (63 percent), the Department invoked exemptions. The remaining 1,384 requests had no records that existed or the request was transferred, abandoned or treated informally.

Privacy Act Requests Received and Completed
Text version: Privacy Act requests received and completed
Year Requests Received Requests Completed
2007–2008 5,002 4,986
2008–2009 5,151 5,188
2009–2010 4,948 4,615
2010–2011 4,609 4,574
2011–2012 4,817 5,058
2012–2013 5,114 5,486
2013–2014 9,961 9,225

III. Exemptions Invoked

The majority of exemptions CIC invoked fell under three sections of the Privacy Act:

  • Section 26, which protects personal information, was used in 3,873 cases (42 percent);
  • Section 21, which covers international relations, defence and subversive activities, was used in 3,724 cases (40 percent); and
  • Paragraph 22(1)(b), which addresses law enforcement and criminal investigations, was used in 758 cases (8 percent).

It should be noted that more than one section can be applied to a specific request.

IV. Disclosure of Personal Information Under Subsection 8(2)

In accordance with subsection 8(2) of the Privacy Act, under certain circumstances, a governmental institution may disclose personal information under its control without the consent of the individual to whom the information relates.

During this reporting period, CIC disclosed personal information under subsection 8(2) in responding to 1,220 requests from investigative bodies under paragraph 8(2)(e). CIC also disclosed information under paragraphs 8(2)(a), (b), (c), (d) and (f). No disclosures were made under paragraphs 8(2)(g), (h), (i), (k), (l) and (m).

V. Consultations

In addition to processing requests received directly under the Privacy Act, CIC was consulted by other federal government institutions in 42 cases where the records under their control related to CIC activities.

VI. Extensions

Section 15 of the Privacy Act allows an extension of the statutory time limits if consultations are necessary, if translation is required or if the request is for a large volume of records and processing it within the original time limit would unreasonably interfere with the operations of the Department.

CIC invoked a total of 234 extensions during the 2013–2014 reporting period. Of these, 33 were deemed necessary so that CIC could consult with other federal institutions prior to responding. Extensions were required in a further 201 instances to search for or through a large volume of records. The Department did not invoke any extensions for translation purposes.

VII. Completion Time

CIC responded to 5,774 requests (63 percent) within 30 days or less and a further 2,721 requests (29 percent) within 31 to 60 days. The Department completed 388 requests (4 percent) within 61 to 120 days and 342 requests (4 percent) required 121 days or more to complete.

Privacy Requests Completion Time
Text version: Privacy requests completion time
Completion times Percentage
Within 30 days or less 63
31 to 60 days 29
61 to 120 days 4
121 days or more 4

VIII. Complaints

During the 2013–2014 reporting period, the Department was notified of 39 privacy complaints received by the OPC. This represents less than half a percent of all requests completed during this period. The majority of complaints were related to processing times.

During the reporting period, 27 complaint investigations were completed. Of these, 16 were deemed not well founded or discontinued, while 11 were resolved to the satisfaction of the requester.

IX. Appeals to the Federal Court

No appeals to the Federal Court were filed against CIC regarding Privacy Act complaints during the 2013–2014 reporting period.

X. Privacy Impact Assessments

To fulfil its mandate and effectively deliver its programs and services, CIC collects, uses and discloses personal information. In accordance with the TBS policy, the Department regularly undertakes Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) to determine whether privacy risks are present in new or existing departmental programs, initiatives or projects that collect and retain personal information.

During the 2013 fiscal year, CIC initiated 25 PIAs and checklists. Among them, three PIAs were completed and their executive summaries are provided below. (PIA report summaries for CIC can be found on Canada.ca.)

Global Visa Application Centre Network: Phase Two

Since 2000, Visa Application Centres (VACs) have helped Visa Offices (VOs) provide administrative support for visa and immigration applications across the globe. Prior to 2013, CIC had 60 VACs located in 41 countries in which most of the agreements in place were locally managed through service agreements with corresponding VOs.

The PIA report is the second and final PIA conducted on CIC’s Global VAC Network and is an update based on CIC’s assessment of the Privacy Management Plans provided by the two winning contractors, including country-specific analyses and the risk mitigations previously implemented. Both PIA reports assess the privacy impact of using VACs for the temporary resident (TR) line of business. While there was no high-level privacy risks identified relating to the global VAC network, there are a limited number of medium-to-low level risks associated with the privacy principles of Safeguards, Accuracy and Retention. The PIA further describes the various mitigation mechanisms as a result of these risks and describes the various privacy and security requirements built into the Global VAC Request for Proposal.

Information Sharing with PopData BC

CIC and Population Data (PopData) BC have agreed on a framework that allows disclosure of CIC data for the purpose of facilitating CIC-authorized immigrant health research projects with individual researchers who apply to access data held at PopData.

CIC will disclose personal information from the permanent residents database for the period from 1985 to the present, along with annual updates, to PopData. PopData will link British Columbia’s provincial personal information with the permanent residents personal information data provided by CIC to create linked de-identified research extracts that can be made available to researchers working on CIC-authorized and approved projects.

Any researchers requesting CIC data must be vetted and approved by CIC. Approved research projects will be documented in a Research Undertaking Arrangement between CIC and the researcher and forwarded to Population Data BC to authorize data provision to the researcher. The Research Undertaking Arrangement between CIC and the researcher will clearly state that the researcher is not permitted to manipulate the data in such a way that would cause the re-personalization or re-identification of the data.

U.S. Service Channel Agreement

The PIA report is a PIA for CIC’s Temporary Resident Biometrics Project (TRBP) concerning the U.S. Service Channel Arrangement. The PIA should be read in conjunction with the Interdepartmental TRBP PIA published in November 2012 as it provides a broader privacy risk analysis of the TRBP. The objective of this PIA is to identify and assess the privacy risks associated with the U.S. Service Channel Arrangement.

The TRBP includes the electronic collection of biometric information from certain TR applicants abroad for the purpose of enhancing applicant screening, the individual’s identity at the time of the application and allowing verification of that identity when the individual seeks entry at the border. CIC and the CBSA will work together to use the new biometric identification tools to manage the movement of foreign nationals across and within Canada’s borders in accordance with IRPA and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations, while the Royal Canadian Mounted Police will provide support in the verification and storing of fingerprints and related biographical information.

As part of this new requirement, CIC reached out to its international partner and ally—the (U.S.)—to determine whether it can leverage its existing processes to capture and transmit biometric and related biographical information from certain CIC applicants physically located in the U.S. CIC entered into a MOU with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) in September 2012 to capture and transmit biometric and related biographical information from CIC TR applicants physically located in the U.S.

The PIA identifies a limited number of medium-to-low level risks associated with the principles of Accountability, Limiting Use, Disclosure and Retention, and Challenging Compliance. It further describes the various mitigation mechanisms as a result of these risks and describes the various privacy and security requirements built into the U.S. Service Channel Arrangement Memorandum of Understanding signed by CIC and USCIS.

Passport Program Statistical Overview

I. Requests Received Under the Privacy Act

Between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014, the Passport program received 365 requests under the Privacy Act, which is a 12 percent decrease from the previous reporting period.

II. Disposition of Completed Requests

In 2013–2014, the Passport program completed 370 requests. In 36 cases (10 percent), the Passport program provided all the information requested. In 218 cases (90 percent), the Department invoked exemptions.

III. Exemptions and Exclusions

The exemption most commonly used by the Passport program during the reporting period was section 26, which protects personal information about another individual under the Privacy Act. This exemption was invoked in 215 requests.

The Passport program did not apply any exclusions during the reporting period.

IV. Disclosure of Personal Information under Subsection 8(2)

In accordance with subsection 8(2) of the Privacy Act, under certain circumstances, a governmental institution may disclose personal information under its control without the consent of the individual to whom the information relates.

During this reporting period, the Passport program disclosed personal information under subsection 8(2) in responding to 1,368 requests from investigative bodies under paragraph 8(2)(e).

In addition, under paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Privacy Act, 25 requests were received with 20 resulting in the disclosure of personal information:

  • Fifteen requests were received from the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). The Agency requested contact information (such as address, phone number or any other method of contact) of passengers on commercial aircraft who were sitting in close proximity to a person with a communicable disease for longer than eight hours. The information released by the Passport program was limited to name and contact information. In all cases, the OPC was notified of the release at the same time as the disclosure to PHAC due to the urgency of the requests.
  • An additional five remaining requests pursuant to subparagraph 8(2)(m)(ii) were related to health emergencies of the individuals or to police services requesting information on missing persons or Canadians in need of assistance in a foreign country. The OPC was notified at the same time.
  • The remaining five requests were either abandoned by the requestors or not disclosed as it did not meet the criteria of paragraph 8(2)(m).
V. Extensions

During the reporting period, the Passport program claimed 14 extensions under subparagraph 15(a) (ii), all between 16 and 30 days.

VI. Consultations Received from Other Institutions

When a request contains records that are of greater interest to another institution, the ATIP coordinator for that institution is consulted. Between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014, the Passport program received nine Privacy Act consultation requests from other federal government institutions.

VII. Complaints

During the reporting period, the Passport program was notified of one complaint received by the OPC. The applicant alleged that exemptions were used as a basis for refusing access to records.

The complaint is still under investigation.

VIII. Privacy Impact Assessments

There were no PIAs completed by the Passport program in 2013–2014.

Appendix A: Report on the Privacy Act

Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Name of institution: Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Reporting period: 01/04/2013 to 31/03/2014

Part 1 – Requests under the Privacy Act
Requests under the Privacy Act
  Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 9961
Outstanding from previous reporting period 295
Total 10256
Closed during reporting period 9225
Carried over to next reporting period 1031
Part 2 – Requests closed during the reporting period
2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 140 1186 544 66 32 39 2 2009
Disclosed in part 180 3327 1990 197 55 80 3 5832
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 333 118 84 37 20 22 1 615
Request abandoned 422 68 103 88 34 53 1 769
Total 1075 4699 2721 388 141 194 7 9225
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 30
19(1)(b) 6
19(1)(c) 4
19(1)(d) 9
19(1)(e) 0
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 3724
22(1)(a)(i) 2
22(1)(a)(ii) 4
22(1)(a)(iii) 1
22(1)(b) 758
22(1)(c) 2
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 1
26 3873
27 15
28 0
2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 0
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 177 1976 0
Disclosed in part 454 5636 0
Total 631 7612 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 71719 66689 2009
Disclosed in part 409933 361151 5832
All exempted 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 1874 1494 769

2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Up to 100 pages processed 101-500 pages processed 501-1000 pages processed 1001-5000 pages processed More than 5000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 1935 47081 64 8690 6 3749 4 7169 0 0
Disclosed in part 5223 185730 506 87202 72 44095 30 38740 1 5384
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 768 1388 1 106 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 7926 234199 571 95998 78 47844 34 45909 1 5384
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Legal Advice Sought Interwoven Information Other Total
All disclosed 3 0 0 43 46
Disclosed in part 68 0 0 151 219
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 0 0 0 24 24
Total 71 0 0 218 289

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
1891 1607 281 3 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 989 47 1036
16 to 30 days 211 15 226
31 to 60 days 172 11 183
61 to 120 days 177 15 192
121 to 180 days 100 12 112
181 to 365 days 118 21 139
More than 365 days 2 1 3
Total 1769 122 1891
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0
Part 3 – Disclosures under subsection 8(2)
Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Total
1220 0 1220
Part 4 – Requests for correction of personal information and notations
Requests Number of requests
Requests for correction received 2
Requests for correction accepted 1
Requests for correction refused 0
Notations attached 0
Part 5 – Extensions
5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 15(a)(i)
Interference with operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation or conversion
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 40 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 122 0 33 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 23 0 0 0
Request abandoned 16 0 0 0
Total 201 0 33 0
5.2 Length of extensions
Length of extensions 15(a)(i)
Interference with operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation purposes
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 201 0 33 0
Total 201 0 33 0
Part 6 – Consultations received from other institutions and organizations
6.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
Consultations Other government institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during the reporting period 42 1540 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 42 1540 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 39 1310 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 3 230 0 0
6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 16 7 0 0 0 0 0 23
Disclose in part 11 1 2 0 0 0 0 14
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 27 10 2 0 0 0 0 39
6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Part 7 – Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences
Number of days Number of responses received Number of responses received past deadline
1 to 15 0 0
16 to 30 0 0
31 to 60 0 0
61 to 120 0 0
121 to 180 0 0
181 to 365 0 0
More than 365 0 0
Total 0 0
Part 8 – Resources related to the Privacy Act
8.1 Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries $1,177,527
Overtime $18,290

Goods and Services

Contracts for privacy impact assessments ($0)

Professional services contracts ($6,556)

Other ($44,745)

$51,301
Total $1,247,118
8.2 Human Resources
Resources Dedicated full-time Dedicated part-time Total
Full-time employees 14.98 0.00 14.98
Part-time and casual employees 0.35 0.00 0.35
Regional staff 0.00 0.00 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.00 0.00 0.00
Students 0.11 0.00 0.11
Total 15.44 0.00 15.44

Appendix B: Passport Program Report on the Privacy Act

Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

1.1 Number of Requests
Requests Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 365
Outstanding from previous reporting period 13
Total 378
Closed during reporting period 370
Carried over to next reporting period 8
Part 2 - Requests closed during the reporting period
2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 31 5 0 0 0 0 0 36
Disclosed in part 187 18 9 3 0 0 0 217
All exempted 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 28 2 1 0 0 0 0 31
Request abandoned 79 6 0 0 0 0 0 85
Total 325 32 10 3 0 0 0 370
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of requests
18(2) 2
19(1)(a) 3
19(1)(b) 4
19(1)(c) 0
19(1)(d) 0
19(1)(e) 0
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 2
22(1)(a)(i) 3
22(1)(a)(ii) 2
22(1)(a)(iii) 0
22(1)(b) 4
22(1)(c) 1
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 1
26 215
27 3
28 0
2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 0
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 35 1 0
Disclosed in part 211 3 0
Total 246 4 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 1308 1308 36
Disclosed in part 6785 5142 217
All exempted 30 0 1
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 533 0 85
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Up to 100 pages processed 101-500 pages processed 501-1000 pages processed 1001-5000 pages processed More than 5000 pages processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 34 121 1 82 0 0 1 1105 0 0
Disclosed in part 208 3357 8 1415 1 370 0 0 0 0
All exempted 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 84 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 327 3478 10 1497 1 370 1 1105 0 0
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Assessment of fees Legal advice sought Other Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 16 0 13 0 29
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 0 0 2 0 2
Total 16 0 15 0 31

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
1 0 1 0 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 0 0
31 to 60 days 0 1 1
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 0 1 1
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0
Part 3 – Disclosures under subsection 8(2)
Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Total
1368 25 1393
Part 4 – Requests for correction of personal information and notations
Requests Number of Requests
Requests for correction received 0
Requests for correction accepted 0
Requests for correction refused 0
Notations attached 0
Part 5 – Extensions
5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 15(a)(i)
Interference with operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation or conversion
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 14 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 14 0
5.2 Length of extensions
Length of extensions 15(a)(i)
Interference with operations
15(a)(ii)
Consultation
15(b)
Translation purposes
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 0 14 0
Total 0 0 14 0
Part 6 – Consultations received from other institutions and organizations
6.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
Consultations Other government institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during the reporting period 9 216 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 0 0 0 0
Total 9 216 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 9 216 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 0 0 0 0
6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Disclose in part 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 6
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 9
6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Part 7 – Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences
Number of days Number of responses received Number of responses received past deadline
1 to 15 0 0
16 to 30 0 0
31 to 60 0 0
61 to 120 0 0
121 to 180 0 0
181 to 365 0 0
More than 365 0 0
Total 0 0
Part 8 – Resources related to the Access to Information Act
8.1 Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries $446,037
Overtime $2,686

Goods and Services

Contracts for privacy impact assessments ($0)

Professional services contracts ($0)

Other ($0)

$0
Total $448,723
8.2 Human Resources
Resources Dedicated full-time Dedicated part-time Total
Full-time employees 0.00 0.00 0.00
Part-time and casual employees 1.00 5.00 6.00
Regional staff 0.00 0.00 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.00 0.00 0.00
Students 0.00 0.00 0.00
Total 1.00 5.00 6.00

Appendix C: Delegation Order

Delegation of Authority under the Privacy Act and the Privacy Regulations

Privacy Act – Position/Title Footnote 2
Descriptions Section 1 – DM 2 – ADMCS/
DGCA
3 – AADMSPP/
DGRE
4 – ATIP/
DIR
5 – ATIP/
MCCI
6 – ATIP/
MPM05/
SUPPM04
7 – ATIP/
PM05
8 – ATIP/
PM–04
9 – ATIP/
PM03
Disclosure to investigative bodies 8(2)(e) yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Disclosure for research and statistics 8(2)(j) yes yes yes no no no no no no
Disclosure in public interest clearly outweighs any invasion of privacy 8(2)(m)(i) yes no no no no no no no no
Disclosure in public interest, benefit of individual 8(2)(m)(ii) yes no no no no no no no no
Record of disclosure for investigations 8(4) yes yes no yes yes no no no no
Notify Privacy Commissioner of 8(2)(m) 8(5) yes yes no yes no no no no no
Record of consistent uses 9(1) yes yes no yes no no no no no
Notify Privacy Commissioner of consistent uses 9(4) yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Personal information in banks 10(1) yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Notice where access is granted 14 yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Extension of time limits 15 yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Notice where access is refused 16 yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Decision regarding translation 17(2)(b) yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Conversion to alternate format 17(3)(b) yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Refuse access – exempt bank 18(2) yes yes no yes yes yes yes no no
Refuse access – confidential information 19(1) yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Disclose confidential information 19(2) yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – federal–provincial affairs 20 yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – international affairs, defence 21 yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – law enforcement and investigation 22 yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – security clearance 23 yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – person under sentence 24 yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – safety of individuals 25 yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – another person’s information 26 yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Refuse access – solicitor–client privilege 27 yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Refuse access – medical record 28 yes yes yes yes yes no no no yes
Receive notice of investigation 31 yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Representation to Privacy Commissioner 33(2) yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Response to findings and recommendations of the Privacy Commissioner within a specified time 35(1)(b) yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Access given to complainant 35(4) yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Response to review of exempt banks 36(3)(b) yes yes no yes yes no no no no
Response to review of compliance 37(3) yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Request of court hearing in the National Capital Region 51(2)(b) yes yes no yes yes no no no no
Ex parte representation to court 51(3) yes yes no yes yes yes no no no
Privacy Regulations – Position/Title Footnote 2
Descriptions Section 1 – DM 2 – ADMCS/
DGCA
3 – AADMSPP/
DGRE
4 – ATIP/
DIR
5 – ATIP/
MCCI
6 – ATIP/
MPM05/
SUPPM04
7 – ATIP/
PM05
8 – ATIP/
PM–04
9 – ATIP/
PM03
Examination of records 9 yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Correction of personal information 11(2) yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Notification of refusal to correct personal information 11(4) yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes yes
Disclosure – medical information 13(1) yes yes no yes yes no no no no
Disclosure – medical information – examine in person, in the presence of a duly qualified medical practitioner 14 yes yes no yes yes no no no no

Legend

DM
Deputy Minister
ADMCS/DGCA
ADM, Corporate Services / Director General, Corporate Affairs
ATIP/DIR
Director, Access to Information and Privacy (EX-01)
ATIP/MCCI
Manager, Complex Cases and Issues, ATIP (PM-06)
ATIP/MPM05/
SUPPM04
Managers, Operations and Fast Track, ATIP (PM-05) / Supervisor, Fast Track (PM-04)
ATIP/PM05
Senior ATIP Administrators, ATIP (PM-05)
ATIP/PM04
ATIP Administrators, ATIP (PM-04)
ATIP/PM03
ATIP Officers, ATIP (PM-03)
Date Modified: