Report on Plans and Priorities 2015–2016

ISSN 2292-5910

Table of Contents


Minister’s Message

I am pleased to present the 2015–2016 Report on Plans and Priorities for Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC). In the coming year, the Government of Canada will ensure the immigration system continues to help drive Canada’s growth and economic prosperity. The plans and priorities detailed in this year’s report support that goal, while also upholding our country’s great humanitarian and family reunification traditions.

In 2015, we plan to welcome between 260,000 and 285,000 new permanent residents to Canada. This is a notable increase from the annual planning range of 240,000 to 265,000, in place since 2007. It represents the highest planned level of admissions in recent Canadian history, and will make it easier for us to maintain all of our immigration streams while continuing our significant progress on reducing backlogs and wait times throughout the immigration system. Almost 65% of overall admissions this year will be in the economic immigration class, an increase of two per cent over last year’s planned levels. The remaining 35% of admissions will be in the family reunification and humanitarian categories, including refugees.

The introduction of Express Entry on January 1, 2015, underlines the Government’s commitment to ensuring the immigration system supports a strong and prosperous Canada. This new approach to managing and processing applications in our economic immigration programs enables us to select immigrants based on the skills and attributes our country needs, and on criteria linked to immigrants’ economic success.

As we continue to support economic immigration, we will not lose sight of our obligation to protect the most vulnerable of newcomers, particularly immigrant women and children. Once implemented, the Zero Tolerance for Barbaric Cultural Practices Act tabled in November 2014 will strengthen our laws to protect Canadians and newcomers to Canada from harmful practices, including underage, forced and polygamous marriage, which deny gender equality and deprive individuals of their human rights.

We will also be increasing the number of caregivers becoming permanent residents to 30,000 in 2015, an all-time high in that category. Coupled with reforms introduced in 2014, including the elimination of the requirement to live in an employer’s home, the Caregiver Program will be better, faster and safer for caregivers seeking to make Canada their permanent home.

In the coming year, we will continue to improve our overseas integration and settlement services to ensure immigrants are best set for success and prepared to begin contributing to Canada before they arrive here. Proposals for pre-arrival services will continue to undergo evaluations.

With the passage into law in 2014 of the Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act, we will continue to benefit from the first comprehensive reforms to the Citizenship Act in more than a generation. In the coming year, these reforms will allow us to significantly reduce citizenship processing times, which will enable more qualified newcomers to become citizens.

We will continue to work with our international partners, especially the United States, to ensure the safety and security of our borders, while improving efficiencies and ease of travel for legitimate visitors to Canada. Under the Beyond the Border Action Plan, we will oversee the implementation of the Electronic Travel Authorization program, an easy and quick application process for visa-exempt air travellers from countries other than the United States.

As Canada’s Citizenship and Immigration Minister, I present these plans with the conviction they will strengthen Canada’s economy, social cohesion, and national security. The success of our programs depends on the hard work and commitment of CIC’s staff. I would like to thank them for their outstanding service to the citizens, and potential future citizens, of our country.

The Honourable Chris Alexander, PC, MP
Canada's Citizenship and Immigration Minister

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: Chris Alexander

Deputy Head: Anita Biguzs

Ministerial portfolio:

Enabling Instruments: Section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867, the Citizenship Act, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), the Canadian Multiculturalism Act and the Canadian Passport Order.

Year established: 1994

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

In the first years after Confederation, Canada’s leaders had a powerful vision: to connect Canada by rail and make the West the world’s breadbasket as a foundation for the country’s economic prosperity. This vision meant quickly populating the Prairies, leading the Government of Canada to establish its first national immigration policies. Immigrants have been a driving force in Canada’s nationhood and its economic prosperity—as farmers settling lands, as workers in factories fuelling industrial growth, as entrepreneurs and as innovators helping Canada to compete in the global, knowledge-based economy.

Responsibilities

Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) selects foreign nationals as permanent and temporary residents and offers Canada’s protection to refugees. The Department develops Canada’s admissibility policy, which sets the conditions for entering and remaining in Canada; it also conducts, in collaboration with its partners, the screening of potential permanent and temporary residents to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. Fundamentally, the Department builds a stronger Canada by helping immigrants and refugees settle and integrate into Canadian society and the economy, and by encouraging and facilitating Canadian citizenship. To achieve this, CIC operates 22 in-Canada points of service and 66 points of service in 58 countries.

CIC's broad mandate is partly derived from the Department of Citizenship and Immigration Act. The Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada is responsible for the Citizenship Act of 1977 and shares responsibility with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness for the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), which came into force following major legislative reform in 2002. CIC and the Canada Border Services Agency support their respective ministers in the administration and enforcement of IRPA. These organizations work collaboratively to achieve and balance the objectives of the immigration and refugee programs.

In October 2008, responsibility for administration of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act was transferred to CIC from the Department of Canadian Heritage. Under the Act, CIC promotes the integration of individuals and communities into all aspects of Canadian society and helps to build a stronger, more cohesive society.

In July 2013, the primary responsibility for the Passport Program was transferred from Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) to CIC, while passport service delivery will be provided through Service Canada.

In August 2013, CIC assumed the responsibility for International Experience Canada (IEC) from DFATD. This transfer allowed the program to better align with government priorities and labour market demands in Canada by linking IEC to other immigration programs.

Jurisdiction over immigration is a shared responsibility between the federal and the provincial and territorial governments under section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

  • Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada's economy
    • Program 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents
      • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers
      • Sub-Program 1.1.2: Federal Skilled Tradespersons
      • Sub-Program 1.1.3: Quebec Skilled Workers
      • Sub-Program 1.1.4: Provincial Nominees
      • Sub-Program 1.1.5: Live-in Caregivers
      • Sub-Program 1.1.6: Canadian Experience Class
      • Sub-Program 1.1.7: Federal Business Immigrants
      • Sub-Program 1.1.8: Quebec Business Immigrants
    • Program 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents
      • Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Students
      • Sub-Program 1.2.2: Temporary Work Authorization
      • Sub-Program 1.2.3: International Experience Canada

  • Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
    • Program 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration
      • Sub-Program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification
      • Sub-Program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification
      • Sub-Program 2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations
    • Program 2.2: Refugee Protection
      • Sub-Program 2.2.1: Government-Assisted Refugees
      • Sub-Program 2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees
      • Sub-Program 2.2.3: Blended Visa Office Referred Refugees
      • Sub-Program 2.2.4: In-Canada Asylum
      • Sub-Program 2.2.5: Pre-removal Risk Assessment
  • Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society
    • Program 3.1: Newcomer Settlement and Integration
      • Sub-Program 3.1.1: Settlement
        • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.1: Language Training
        • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.2: Community and Labour Market Integration Services
      • Sub-Program 3.1.2: Grant to Quebec
      • Sub-Program 3.1.3: Immigration Loan
      • Sub-Program 3.1.4: Resettlement Assistance Program
    • Program 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians
      • Sub-Program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness
      • Sub-Program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation
    • Program 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians
      • Sub-Program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness
      • Sub-Program 3.3.2: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support
  • Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians
    • Program 4.1: Health Protection
      • Sub-Program 4.1.1: Health Screening
      • Sub-Program 4.1.2: Medical Surveillance and Notification
      • Sub-Program 4.1.3: Interim Federal Health
    • Program 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management
      • Sub-Program 4.2.1: Permanent Resident Status Documents
      • Sub-Program 4.2.2: Visitors Status
      • Sub-Program 4.2.3: Temporary Resident Permits
      • Sub-Program 4.2.4: Fraud Prevention and Program Integrity Protection
      • Sub-Program 4.2.5: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants
    • Program 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda
    • Program 4.4: Passport
  • Program 5.1: Internal Services

Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Footnote 1 Strategic Outcomes
Emphasizing people management Ongoing SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling
Description

Why is this a priority?

Strong people management is fundamental to the success of CIC’s transformative and modernization efforts, which include ongoing changes to both policies and operational approaches. Additional emphasis is required in times of change to make the necessary training and recruitment support available and to appropriately structure the process, procedures and tools to ensure efficiency and streamlining. There must also be an increased focus on workplace wellness to retain staff and maintain employee health and morale.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

CIC will continue to pursue several key strategic initiatives to advance this priority, including:

  • Increase capacity and strengthen strategic human resources planning to support increased staffing volumes and client needs.
  • Implement efficiencies identified through LEANNote * review of staffing.
  • Continue to implement key initiatives, such as the Directive on Performance Management, the Transformation of Pay Initiative and the Diversity and Employment Equity and Official Languages action plans, to enable a healthy workplace and a high-performing, innovative and collaborative work force.
  • Continue to implement the human resources transformation vision, including generic national work descriptions and the consolidation of pay services.
  • Develop and implement an action plan in response to the results of the 2014 Public Service Employee Survey.
  • Undertake employee wellness activities as part of CIC’s Destination 2020 action plan, with a departmental wellness ambassador hosting several seminars on wellness and change management in the workplace to help employees adapt to transformation.
Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Improving/modernizing client service Ongoing SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling
Description

Why is this a priority?

CIC provides many services to clients both within and outside of Canada. It is therefore essential to have a strategic and coherent approach to the design and delivery of services that responds to client needs, realizes operational efficiencies, fosters effectiveness and promotes a culture of service excellence. Striving towards service excellence by improving and modernizing services will help maximize the performance and competitiveness of Canada’s immigration programs and help attract potential applicants.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  • CIC will continue to progressively offer more and more e-services. This improves client service by simplifying the application process while at the same time reducing the costs per transaction through process streamlining and automation. In 2015–2016, CIC will continue to improve and modernize client service by:

Managing client service initiatives:

  • Implementing requirements from the Treasury Board Policy on Service by
    • Exploring ways to provide real-time updates to clients on service standards;
    • Launching a comprehensive Service Strategy; and
    • Developing a user engagement approach to promote awareness and uptake of e-services

Improving ease of use:

  • Launching online applications for Express Entry, electronic Travel Authorization (eTA), and for some citizenship and passport services
  • Introducing dynamic web forms for temporary resident online applications that adjust questions asked based on individual circumstances
  • Continuing roll-out of a new Grants and Contributions System, including an online portal to support the Call for Proposals

Providing timely service:

  • Maintaining and meeting service standards by
    • Processing fully complete, straightforward eTA applications within 72 hours or less and Express Entry applications in six months;
    • Taking advantage of the new citizenship decision-maker model and increasing the proportion of citizenship grants finalised in 12 months;
    • Expediting the processing of straightforward temporary resident applications; and
    • Improving how files are distributed around the processing network, streamlining processes and centralizing the processing of certain types of applications to further reduce application backlogs

Providing up-to-date case status information:

  • Improving how processing times are communicated to clients on the Web site
  • Providing more self-serve case status information for more services through MyCIC

Providing clear decisions:

  • Completing plain language reviews to ensure communication to clients is understandable and free of jargon

Ensuring clients can provide service feedback:

  • Reviewing results of client satisfaction surveys and devising service improvements based on results
  • Responding to and analysing service feedback received through the Client Feedback Mechanism and devising service improvements based on the feedback
Priority Type Strategic Outcomes
Promoting management excellence and accountability Ongoing SO 1, 2, 3, 4—Enabling
Description

Why is this a priority?

Strong management practices, oversight and accountability, strengthened compliance and monitoring, simplified internal rules and procedures, and improved internal services enable the Department to effectively manage its financial, human, information, assets and accommodation resources to achieve its priorities. CIC will continue to build a strong, high-performing institution that is nimble, connected, engaged and ready to face new challenges.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

CIC will continue to optimize the effectiveness and efficiency of its internal services to support program delivery and improve departmental management practices.  The Department will manage its partnerships within the Government of Canada to deliver timely and efficient corporate services and provide the optimal conditions for building a high performing and adaptable workforce. Specifically, CIC will focus on:

  • Implementing information technology solutions to modernize Grants and Contributions management, payment of fees, citizenship grants and information management.
  • Providing learning and development opportunities for employees in areas of project, risk, conflict, information and performance management; operations; access to information; privacy and security.
  • Reviewing departmental memoranda of understanding for continued relevance, and introducing rigorous risk-management controls.
  • Enhancing the Department’s capacity to manage project investments through the continued implementation of project management learning and certification programs.
  • Developing departmental strategic procurement capabilities through the efficient use of tools, processes and implementation of a strengthened organizational structure.

Risk Analysis

Corporate risks and mitigation strategies identified by senior management are used to set CIC’s strategic directions and inform the development of the Integrated Corporate Plan. Risks and mitigation strategies are reviewed quarterly so they remain current. In 2015–2016, CIC’s ongoing efforts to improve its Corporate Risk Profile will include further refinement of risk-mitigating milestones in its Integrated Corporate Plan, focusing on those that will have the most significant impact on mitigating corporate risks.

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Managing a Significant Policy and Program Change Agenda

There is a risk that CIC may not be able to implement key pieces of its extensive transformative change agenda and meet existing operational objectives.
  • Continue to advance CIC’s medium- and long-term strategic policy agenda, which aligns with the Government of Canada’s agenda and considers effective operational solutions.
  • Prioritize and leverage resources to improve responsiveness and flexibility of the service delivery network.
  • Build on progress by continuing to improve client experience through improved processes, and more e-services and self-service options.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services

Safeguarding Integrity of Information / Data

There is a risk that CIC’s critical, sensitive or private information could be stolen or inadvertently compromised, lost, or improperly shared, which could have a significant impact on CIC’s service delivery, clients, and reputation.
  • Complete implementation of GCDOCSFootnote 2 across the Department to improve internal information sharing and file and version control.
  • Implement a common and secure information sharing service to facilitate data exchanges with external stakeholders.
  • Conduct learning and awareness activities to strengthen information management and privacy knowledge in the workforce.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services

Maintaining Program Integrity in Response to Increasingly Complex Security Risks

There is a risk that CIC will not be adequately equipped to make defensible decisions or to detect or prevent increased attempts to defraud external programs and services, which could undermine the integrity of CIC’s programs and lead to a loss of public confidence.
  • Develop policies and programs to implement an expanded biometric screening program.
  • Expand information-sharing capability, including biometric information sharing.
  • Continue work with enforcement partners, such as the Canada Border Services Agency, to prevent fraud and uncover large-scale fraud trends.
  • Develop additional quality assurance control measures throughout the processing network to better risk manage clientele and identify areas presenting the greater potential for fraud.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4

Depending on Partners to Support Delivery of Programs and Services

Given CIC is dependent on complex partnerships to support policy and program development, as well as to deliver its internal and external services, there is a risk that partners may not engage or deliver services in an efficient and timely manner, which could impact achievement of CIC’s strategic outcomes and operational objectives.
  • Work closely with partners and stakeholders to develop and advance multilateral initiatives.
  • Enhance partnerships with the private sector to reduce inconsistent support and outcomes across jurisdictions.
  • Establish and maintain strong performance requirements for third party service providers, and maintain program integrity through compliance monitoring and quality assurance on agreements.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4

Responding to Cumulative Natural Disasters / Emerging Events

There is a risk that severe or cumulative natural disasters or emerging world events could affect CIC’s operations or infrastructure in ways that could overburden or shut down its program delivery system, endanger employees and Canadians, and undermine the Department’s and Canada’s reputations.
  • Maintain an active crisis management working unit to mitigate spikes in operations due to political unrest.
  • Maintain and improve security, emergency response, and business continuity plans and procedures to allow CIC to respond to unexpected events more effectively and efficiently.
  • Use lessons learned from recent exercises to update contingency plans for all overseas offices, in consultation with Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development partners at missions, starting with those where risks of such disruptions are higher.
  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services
Managing a Significant Policy and Program Change Agenda

CIC will work to help Canada remain economically competitive with other countries and attractive to potential immigrants by continuing to implement one of the most ambitious reform agendas in its history. CIC will create efficiencies and improve the client experience through a wide range of measures, beginning with implementation of the Express Entry application management system launched on January 1, 2015. CIC will work with delivery partners, such as the Canada Border Services Agency and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, to welcome between 260,000 and 285,000 permanent residents in 2015. This first notable increase in planned levels since 2007 will help address both current and projected labour shortages. Other initiatives include improved self-service options like integrated voice response, e-services and CIC’s updated Web site.

Safeguarding Integrity of Information/Data

In 2015–2016, CIC will promote awareness of information and data risks to staff and provide training on information management and best practices for privacy. In addition, CIC will continue to implement stronger and better tools and processes for collecting, managing and storing information, and for sharing it both internally and externally.

Maintaining program integrity in response to increasingly complex security risks

Fraud prevention is an ongoing challenge in immigration and citizenship programs. As program integrity is strengthened, individuals will develop more sophisticated means of gaining illegal entry to Canada. CIC will continue to strengthen program integrity through improved information sharing, increased fraud-related penalties, and reduced inefficiencies in the processing system.

For example, on June 19, 2014, the Strengthening Canadian Citizenship Act (Bill C-24) came into force, reinforcing the value of citizenship by cracking down on fraud and ensuring Canadian citizenship is only offered to those who are qualified. Specific measures include stronger penalties for fraud and misrepresentation; expanding the grounds to bar an application for citizenship to include foreign criminality; and making it an offence for unauthorized individuals to knowingly represent or advise a person for a fee on a citizenship application or hearing.

Depending on Partners to Support Delivery of Programs and Services

The delivery of the immigration program is a shared jurisdiction between federal, provincial and territorial governments. The complexity of the immigration and settlement systems means that decisions made by CIC or any of its partners or stakeholders can significantly affect relationships, performance results and the ability to meet objectives for all stakeholders.

CIC will work closely with other federal departments and agencies, as well as third-party service provider organizationsFootnote 3 and other public stakeholders to deliver the immigration program efficiently and effectively, including the continued use of joint governance structures, service standards, and reporting requirements.

Responding to cumulative natural disasters and emerging events

Natural disasters and international crises can lead to unpredictable migration flows that may require Canada’s intervention and specialized support for resettlement. They can also lead to risks to the health and safety of Canadians or to the temporary closure of operational infrastructure. The Department will maintain and improve its emergency response and business continuity plans and procedures so that it can respond efficiently and effectively when emergencies arise. Based on recent experiences such as the Ebola virus crisis, CIC will review and develop flexible policies and procedures, to enable the Department to provide a timely and coordinated emergency response to unexpected world events that could affect CIC’s program delivery.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
1,464,667,008 1,464,667,008 1,387,894,127 1,394,255,653
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
5,818 5,570 5,451

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Expenditures 2014–15 Forecast Spending 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2016–17 Planned Spending 2017–18 Planned Spending
1.1 Permanent Economic Residents 40,200,532 79,311,818 91,056,135 99,145,934 99,145,934 52,512,010 51,910,775
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents 20,617,661 20,831,035 35,955,538 24,278,038 24,278,038 24,062,558 23,795,878
Strategic Outcome 1 Subtotal 60,818,193 100,142,853 127,011,673 123,423,972 123,423,972 76,574,568 75,706,653

Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Expenditures 2014–15 Forecast Spending 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2016–17 Planned Spending 2017–18 Planned Spending
2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration 48,674,101 44,096,198 49,738,658 37,572,058 37,572,058 37,980,719 37,588,379
2.2 Refugee Protection 30,301,402 28,698,237 38,366,279 30,059,852 30,059,852 20,357,936 20,153,863
Strategic Outcome 2 Subtotal 78,975,503 72,794,435 88,104,937 67,631,910 67,631,910 58,338,655 57,742,242

Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Expenditures 2014–15 Forecast Spending 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2016–17 Planned Spending 2017–18 Planned Spending
3.1 Newcomer Settlement and Integration 950,739,681 970,807,076 1,027,356,762 1,014,017,140 1,014,017,140 1,014,602,101 1,014,356,750
3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 46,583,524 62,517,787 93,354,162 68,062,779 68,062,779 67,270,183 66,684,294
3.3 Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians 15,120,234 9,793,615 11,766,354 13,049,066 13,049,066 11,521,963 11,491,206
Strategic Outcome 3 Subtotal 1,012,443,439 1,043,118,478 1,132,477,278 1,095,128,985 1,095,128,985 1,093,394,247 1,092,532,250

Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2012–13 Expenditures 2013–14 Expenditures 2014–15 Forecast Spending 2015–16 Main Estimates 2015–16 Planned Spending 2016–17 Planned Spending 2017–18 Planned Spending
4.1 Health Protection 59,616,808 38,115,873 59,817,227 63,217,689 63,217,689 61,803,321 61,705,775
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management 76,410,491 93,642,100 84,467,491 124,537,482 124,537,482 120,437,839 118,721,869
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda 3,282,924 5,616,646 8,471,187 5,177,541 5,177,541 5,284,973 5,255,778
4.4 PassportFootnote A (206,332,014) (254,192,238) (202,153,477 (202,153,477) (208,677,357) (196,093,245)
Strategic Outcome 4 Subtotal 139,310,223 (68,957,395) (101,436,333) (9,220,765) (9,220,765) (21,151,224) (10,409,823)
Internal Services Subtotal 231,778,110 231,596,325 214,357,508 187,702,906 187,702,906 180,737,881 178,684,331
Total 1,523,325,468 1,378,694,696 1,460,515,063 1,464,667,0088 1,464,667,008 1,387,894,127 1,394,255,653

Planned spending decreases by $77M in 2016–2017. This is due primarily to a reduction in funding for the return of fees for terminated applications, the impact of refugee reform as well as the completion of time-limited initiatives under the Beyond the Border Action Plan. From 2016–2017 to 2017–2018, planned spending increases by $6M and is mostly related to a combination of reduced revenues from passport program and a decrease in funding for the Beyond of Border initiative.

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2015–2016 Planned Spending With the Whole-of-Government-Framework (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2015–16 Planned Spending
1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy 1.1 Permanent Economic Residents Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 99,145,934
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 24,278,038
2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted 2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 37,572,058
2.2 Refugee Protection International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 30,059,852
3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society 3.1 Newcomer Settlement and Integration Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 1,014,017,140
3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 68,062,779
3.3 Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 13,049,066
4: Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians 4.1 Health Protection Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 63,217,689
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 124,537,482
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 5,177,541
4.4 Passport International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement (202,153,477)

Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs 123,423,972
Social Affairs 1,320,456,214
International Affairs (166,916,084)
Government Affairs

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend
Text version: Departmental Spending Trend 2012-2013 to 2017-2018

This graph shows the Department's spending trend for grants and contributions, operating and statutory expenditures from 2012–2013 to 2017–2018. The data represents actual spending (2012–2013 to 2013–2014), forecast spending (2014–2015) and planned spending (2015–2016 to 2017–2018). The data is broken down between statutory and voted expenditures as shown below:

 
  2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
Statutory $ 73,714,273 - $ 100,028,359 - $ 148,100,677 - $ 95,389,806 - $ 149,739,640 - $ 149,739,640
Votes $ 1,449,611,195 $ 1,478,723,055 $ 1,608,615,740 $ 1,560,056,814 $ 1,537,633,767 $ 1,531,814,242

Overall, the Department’s planned spending will be reduced from current levels to $1,394.3 million in 2017–2018. This decrease is largely due to declining statutory funding supporting the return of fees for terminated applications as announced in Economic Action Plan 2012.

The negative amount in statutory spending is mostly explained by the anticipated surplus of the Passport Program. As this program is financed entirely from the fees charged for passports and other travel documents, its costs and revenues must balance out over its 10-year business cycle.

Estimates by Vote

For information on CIC’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2015–2016 Main Estimates on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Web site.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section describes the four strategic outcomes of CIC, reflecting the long-term results that the programs are designed to achieve. The program descriptions and the information regarding benefits to Canadians outline how respective programs support the strategic outcomes. The section also provides details on each program, such as the expected results, performance indicators, targets, planning highlights, and the related financial and non-financial resources. The systematic collection, interpretation and analysis of performance measurement results is a key annual activity and enables the Department to report on expected results through the Departmental Performance Report and to broadly use performance information across the organization to inform decision making.

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada's economy

CIC plays a significant role in fostering Canada’s economic development. By promoting Canada as a destination of choice for innovation, investment and opportunity, CIC encourages talented individuals to come to Canada and to contribute to our prosperity. Canada’s immigration program is based on non-discriminatory principles—foreign nationals are assessed without regard to race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, religion or gender. Those who are selected to immigrate to Canada have the skills, education, language competencies and work experience to make an immediate economic contribution.

CIC’s efforts, whether through policy and program development or processing applications for the various programs, result in several hundred thousand new permanent residents each year. Under the 2008 amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), the Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Canada has the authority to issue instructions establishing priorities for processing certain categories of applications. In that regard, the Department analyses and monitors its programs to ensure they are responsive to emerging labour market needs.

Through policy and program development and processing applications, CIC’s temporary resident programs help meet Canada’s temporary labour market needs; facilitate global talent mobility and youth exchanges; attract and retain international students; and help enable trade, investment and tourism.

Benefits for Canadians

Immigration continues to have a significant influence on Canadian society and economic development. Permanent residents who arrive in Canada every year enhance Canada’s social fabric, contribute to labour market growth and strengthen the economy. Changes that modernize and improve the immigration system not only strengthen the integrity of the Permanent Economic Residents Program but also benefit Canada by targeting skills Canadian employers need and admitting qualified individuals more quickly.

Temporary foreign workers help generate growth for a number of Canadian industries by meeting short-term and acute needs in the labour market that are not easily filled by the domestic labour force. International students contribute economically as consumers and enrich the fabric of Canadian society through their diverse experiences and talents. Some temporary workers and international students represent a key talent pool to be retained as immigrants.

Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved

Rank within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development of employment rate for all immigrants

≤ 5 End of each calendar year

Canada’s Immigration Plan for 2015

The immigration levels set out in Canada’s immigration plan for 2015 reflect the important role of immigration in supporting Canada’s economic growth and prosperity. In addition, the plan fulfils key objectives of IRPAto reunite families and uphold Canada’s international legal obligations. Further details can be found in the Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration 2014.

Plan Type Low High
Economic Federal Skilled Workers (including Federal Skilled Trades) 47,000 51,000
Canadian Experience Class 21,000 23,000
Caregivers Footnote 4 26,000 30,000
Federal Business 1,000 1,700
Quebec Business 5,000 5,500
Quebec Skilled Workers 26,000 27,000
Provincial Nominees Program 46,000 48,000
Ministerial Instruction Economic Programs Footnote 5 100 500
Economic Total 172,100 186,700
Percentage Mix 66.2% 65.5%
Family Spouses, Partners and Children (includes Public Policy) 45,000 48,000
Parents and Grandparents 18,000 20,000
Family Total 63,000 68,000
Percentage Mix 24.2% 23.9%
Humanitarian Protected Persons in Canada and Dependants Abroad Footnote 6 10,000 11,000
Government-Assisted Refugees 5,800 6,500
Blended Visa Office Referred Refugees 700 1,000
Privately Sponsored Refugees 4,500 6,500
Public Policy – Federal Resettlement Assistance 400 500
Public Policy – Other 500 700
Humanitarian and Compassionate 3,000 4,000
Humanitarian Total 24,900 30,200
Percentage Mix 9.6% 10.6%
  Permit Holders 0 100
  OVERALL 260,000 285,000

Program 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in IRPA, the focus of this program is on the selection and processing of immigrants who can support the development of a strong and prosperous Canada, in which the benefits of immigration are shared across all regions of Canada. The acceptance of qualified permanent residents helps the government meet its economic objectives, such as building a skilled work force, addressing immediate and longer-term labour market needs, and supporting national and regional labour force growth. The selection and processing of applications involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
99,145,934 99,145,934 52,512,010 51,910,775

The decrease in planned spending for this program starting in 2016–2017 is due to the termination of the statutory funding profile in 2015–2016 that supported the return of fees for terminated applications.

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
458 448 439
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The benefits of economic immigration are shared across all regions of Canada Percentage of economic permanent resident principal applicants who settle and are retained outside of the Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver census metropolitan areas (CMAs) three years after landing > 40% End of each calendar year
Economic immigrants support the long-term economic goals of Canada Employment earnings of economic principal applicants relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing 100% Calendar year 2020
Immigration increasingly contributes to Canada’s economic growth

Percentage of economic permanent resident admissions relative to overall permanent resident admissions

64.9% End of 2014 calendar year
Temporary residents’ transitions to permanent residence strengthen Canada’s long-term economic goals Number of temporary resident principal applicants who transition to permanent residence in economic immigration categories 30,000–35,000 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlights
  • Facilitate Canada's immigration of permanent residents through immigration levels planning that reflects economic demand, while supporting fast and flexible economic immigration through the Express Entry application management system. Immigration planning will focus primarily on meeting labour market needs across Canada and improving social and economic settlement and integration outcomes.
  • Continue progress on Phase II of the development and implementation of Express Entry.
  • Manage, when appropriate, intake of some non-Express Entry applications through the use of Ministerial Instructions to improve wait times and reduce application inventories in certain immigration categories, while improving responsiveness to labour market conditions and attaining targeted economic objectives.
  • Explore policy options for the improvement of Francophone immigration outside Quebec.
Sub-Program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers

The Federal Skilled Workers (FSW) Program is the Government of Canada’s main selection system for skilled immigration. The goal of the program is to select highly skilled immigrants whose high human capital enables them to contribute to Canada’s long-term national and structural labour market needs, in support of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy. The program uses a points system to identify prospective immigrants with the ability to establish economically in Canada, based on their human capital (education, skilled work experience, language skills, etc.), with a minimum language threshold and a third-party foreign educational credential assessment prior to application. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
52,124,912 22,354,260 22,079,970

Planned spending declines in 2016–2017 and future years, representing the end of the funding profile supporting the return of fees for terminated applications as announced in Economic Action Plan 2012.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
181 177 174
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
FSWs with high human capital adapt to the long-term needs of the Canadian economy and labour market FSW principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing + 15% Calendar year 2020
Percentage of FSW principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing ≥ 35% Calendar year 2020
Rate of social assistance for FSW principal applicants, five years after landing ≤ 5% Calendar year 2020
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to effectively manage the inventory of applications and reduce overall processing times, while meeting the commitment of six-months processing time for Express Entry applications.
  • Ensure the FSW Program is successfully functioning within the Express Entry application management system and that it selects skilled immigrants with the human capital and skills to succeed over the long term in the Canadian economy.
Sub-Program 1.1.2: Federal Skilled Tradespersons

The Federal Skilled Tradespersons Program (FSTP) is intended to attract skilled tradespersons who can meet labour demands in specific trades across the country and who are granted permanent residence based on being qualified in a skilled trade. In contrast with the FSW Program’s points-based selection, the FSTP operates on a streamlined pass/fail basis with four mandatory criteria including: a minimum language threshold; a valid offer of employment in Canada or a certificate of qualification from a province or territory in a qualifying skilled trade; at least two years of work experience in the occupation within the last five years; and meeting the employment requirements set out in the National Occupational Classification system. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
1,746,420 1,719,435 1,689,110
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
7 7 7
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federal skilled tradespersons (FSTs) support the long-term economic goals of Canada with skills that are in demand in the Canadian economy and labour market FST principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing To be determined (TBD) in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing is available TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing is available
Percentage of FST principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing is available TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing is available
Rate of social assistance for FST principal applicants, five years after landing TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing is available TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing is available
Planning Highlights
  • Assess whether the FSTP has the appropriate selection criteria to attract and retain skilled workers to address regional labour shortages and strengthen Canada’s economy.
  • Ensure the FSTP operates successfully within the Express Entry application management system.
Sub-Program 1.1.3: Quebec Skilled Workers

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and to issue permanent resident visas. The Quebec Skilled Workers (QSW) Program uses specific criteria to identify immigrants with the human capital and skills needed to establish economically in Quebec. Similar to the FSW Program, the QSW Program assesses applicants according to their age, education, work experience, language proficiency (in French) and enhanced settlement prospects (previous education or work experience in Canada, or a confirmed job offer). The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
6,654,807 6,579,607 6,506,704
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
59 58 57
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Successful QSW applicants are admitted to Quebec Number of admissions of QSWs destined to Quebec 26,000–27,000 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to effectively manage the inventory of applications and reduce overall processing times in order to meet the service standard.
  • Process applications of skilled workers for permanent residence selected by the Government of Quebec to support that province in achieving its economic immigration goals.
Sub-Program 1.1.4: Provincial Nominees

The Provincial Nominees (PN) Program supports the Government of Canada’s objective that the benefits of immigration be shared across all regions of Canada. Bilateral immigration agreements are in place with all provinces and territories except Nunavut and Quebec,Footnote 7 conferring on their governments the authority to identify and nominate for permanent residence immigrants who will meet local economic development and regional labour market needs, and who wish to settle in that specific province or territory. As part of the nomination process, provincial and territorial governments assess the skills, education and work or business experience of prospective candidates to ensure that nominees can make an immediate economic contribution to the nominating province or territory. CIC retains the final authority to select nominees who can establish economically in Canada, and verifies that nominees meet all admissibility requirements before issuing permanent resident visas. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
5,431,823 5,370,245 5,312,670
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
50 49 47
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
PNs support the long-term economic goals of Canada with applicants that are nominated by provinces and territories in response to regional economic and labour market needs Percentage of PN principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing ≥ 25% End of each calendar year
PNs support the long-term economic goals of the province or territory of nomination PN principal applicants’ incidence of employment, in their province or territory of nomination, relative to that province or territory’s incidence of employment earnings, five years after landing ≥ + 10% Calendar year 2020
PNs contribute to the shared benefits of immigration in regions of Canada Percentage of PNs who settle that are retained outside of Toronto and Vancouver CMAs (excludes Quebec and QSWs) ≥ 90% Calendar year 2015
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to effectively manage the inventory of applications and reduce overall processing times, while meeting the commitment of six-months processing time for Express Entry applications.
  • Lead the renewal of federal-provincial-territorial agreements to further clarify the roles and responsibilities of federal, provincial and territorial governments in program integrity, while continuing to work with provinces and territories to ensure program design is aligned with economic and regional labour market needs.
Sub-Program 1.1.5: Live-in Caregivers Footnote 8

The Live-in Caregivers Program (LCP) allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign workers in private residences to provide care for children, elderly persons or persons with a disability. Eligible applicants come to Canada as foreign nationals authorized for temporary work, subject to their employer obtaining a neutral or positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). The LMIA considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available and the wage and working conditions being offered. The critical component of the program distinguishing it from the general pool of foreign nationals authorized for temporary work is the requirement for the caregiver to reside in their place of employment. The program is also unique in that foreign workers arriving in Canada under the program are eligible to apply for permanent residence after two years or 3,900 hours of full-time employment within four years of their arrival in Canada. They are granted permanent residence as part of the live-in caregiver category of the Economic Class, with established room under the annual levels plan. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
8,686,568 8,585,946 8,510,751
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
92 90 88
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Eligible live-in caregivers transition from temporary resident status and are admitted to Canada, along with their family members, as permanent residents Number of temporary live-in caregivers and their family members who obtain permanent resident status 26,000–30,000 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Implement the reformed Caregiver Program, including monitoring the pathways for permanent residence for caregivers and increased permanent residence admissions for caregivers who have already completed their LCP obligations under the 2015 levels plan.
Sub-Program 1.1.6: Canadian Experience Class

The Canadian Experience Class (CEC) was introduced in 2008 as a path to permanent residence for those with eligible work experience in Canada, usually obtained as a result of temporary residence as a foreign worker or international student. The program is complementary to the FSW Program but uses different criteria, including eligible skilled Canadian work experience and a minimum level of proficiency in English or French. The program provides a streamlined route to permanent residence for those who have already established themselves in skilled work in Canada. This allows Canada to retain talented workers who have demonstrated a capacity to integrate successfully and contribute to the Canadian economy. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
4,303,008 4,252,921 4,215,930
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
46 45 44
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Temporary residents who have demonstrated some ability to establish economically in the Canadian labour market transition to permanent residence in support of the long-term economic goals of Canada CEC principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2015 when baseline is available TBD in 2015 when baseline is available
Percentage of CEC principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2015 when baseline is available TBD in 2015 when baseline is available
Rate of social assistance for CEC principal applicants, five years after landing TBD in 2015 when baseline is available TBD in 2015 when baseline is available
Planning Highlights
  • Ensure the CEC operates successfully within the Express Entry application management system.
  • Prepare a Management Response and Action Plan to respond to the findings of the CEC evaluation to be completed in 2015–2016.
Sub-Program 1.1.7: Federal Business Immigrants

Federal business immigrants admitted to Canada are intended to have the experience and skills to support, through their investment, entrepreneurial ideas and business skills, or self-employment, the development of a strong and prosperous economy. The program was designed so that immigrant investors bring business capital to Canada, while entrepreneurs contribute to economic development through business ideas and skills that promote enterprise and employment creation. Self-employed persons hold the intention and ability to be self-employed in Canada in such fields as athletics, cultural activities and farming, thereby making a contribution to specified activities in our economy. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
19,724,439 3,181,001 3,133,111

Planned spending declines in 2016–2017 and future years, representing the end of the funding profile for the return of fees for terminated applications with respect to the Federal Immigrant Investor program and Federal Entrepreneur program.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
19 19 19
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
The investment, entrepreneurship skills and ideas of successful applicants to the Federal Business Immigrants Program contribute to strengthening the Canadian economy Number of Federal Business Immigrant principal applicants admitted to Canada 1,000–1,700 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue the reforms to the Federal Business Immigrants Program, including the new Immigrant Investor Venture Capital pilot program, to ensure that business immigrants make an effective contribution to the Canadian economy in exchange for a pathway to citizenship.
Sub-Program 1.1.8: Quebec Business Immigrants

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and issue permanent resident visas. This program seeks to attract experienced investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons to the province of Quebec, to support the development of a strong and prosperous economy in Quebec. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
473,957 468,595 462,529
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
4 3 3
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Successful Quebec-selected Business Immigrant applicants and family members are admitted to Quebec Number of admissions of Quebec-selected Business Immigrants and family members destined to Quebec 5,000–5,500 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Work with the Government of Quebec to promote business immigration program development that also supports Canada’s economic goals for immigration consistent with Quebec’s annual levels targets.

Program 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in IRPA, the focus of this program is to establish and apply the rules governing entry into Canada of foreign nationals authorized for temporary work and international students. Temporary economic migration enhances Canada’s trade, commerce, cultural, educational and scientific activities, in support of our overall economic and social prosperity and national interests. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas, work permits and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
24,278,038 24,278,038 24,062,558 23,795,878
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
270 265 260
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canada benefits from the timely entry of temporary economic residents Percentage of international student applications finalized within the established service standard

New: 80%

Extensions: 80%
End of each calendar year
Percentage of work permit applications (submitted overseas) finalized within the established service standard 80% End of each calendar year
Percentage of International Experience Canada applications from foreign nationals finalized within service standards 80% End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Recognizing a roughly 2% increase in demand for the program over the last year (2014 over 2013) and anticipating that demand will continue to increase, maintain service standards for temporary economic residents.Footnote 9
Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Students

CIC supports a range of goals for immigration by managing the entry of international students to Canada. International students contribute to Canada’s educational and international competitiveness, and strengthen our educational institutions. International students are selected by Canadian institutions according to their respective criteria, and CIC authorizes their entry into Canada to study by approving study permits and, where necessary, visas, which allow them to obtain a Canadian education. CIC is responsible for ensuring that the proper documentation, financial and security requirements are met, including the bona fides of all applicants. In order to provide students with additional opportunities to obtain Canadian work experience, qualified international students are authorized to work either on or off-campus without a work permit, or as part of a co-op or internship program with a co-op work permit. Students who want to work in Canada after graduation can apply for a work permit under the Post-Graduation Work Permit (PGWP) component, which allows them to gain up to three years of Canadian work experience. Some PGWP holders will also be eligible to apply for permanent residence under the CEC or other programs. The selection and processing of international students involve the issuance of temporary resident visas and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
8,207,415 8,121,700 8,031,496
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
73 71 70
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Educational institutions and international students benefit from having foreign nationals study and work in Canada Number of student entries into Canada 110,000–125,000 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue working with provinces and territories to advance Canada's position as a world-class destination for international students through the implementation of new requirements on students and institutions, proactive and direct engagement with educational stakeholders, and forward-looking analysis of emerging opportunities in the international stage.
Sub-Program 1.2.2: Temporary Work Authorization

Foreign nationals can be authorized to work in Canada through various processes. Under situations that require an LMIA, employers are able to hire foreign workers as a last resort to meet their short-term or acute labour and skills needs when qualified Canadian citizens or permanent residents are not available, ensuring that Canadians have the first opportunity for jobs where appropriate. In order to hire a temporary foreign worker to respond to labour market shortages, employers require an LMIA from ESDC, which considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available, examines the wage and working conditions being offered, and assess whether the job offer would have a negative, neutral or positive effect on the Canadian labour market. Once the potential employer is in possession of the LMIA, the foreign national may then apply for the work permit at a mission abroad, at the port of entry (if eligible) or inside Canada (if eligible). In certain situations, employers can also seek to employ foreign nationals to work in Canada without an LMIA. Exemptions from the LMIA process are offered where they support broader Canadian interests such as the competitive advantages and reciprocal benefits that Canadians enjoy as a result of international agreements and partnerships (including North America Free Trade Agreement and others). Under these circumstances, the foreign national applies to CIC for a work permit overseas, at a port of entry (if eligible) or from inside Canada (if eligible). CIC’s role is to manage the authorization of foreign nationals to work in Canada. CIC ensures the foreign national meets all admissibility and eligibility requirements, and, when an LMIA is not required, considers the genuineness of the job offer, while also ensuring a robust operation is in place to enforce employer compliance with program requirements. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas and work permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
16,070,623 15,940,858 16,764,382
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
143 140 137
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Eligible foreign nationals authorized for temporary work enter Canada, consistent with regulations and standards Number of entries into Canada of foreign nationals authorized for temporary work 150,000–210,000 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue implementation of a new employer compliance regime for the International Mobility Program to ensure the program is being used as intended to advance Canada’s economic, social and cultural interests.
  • In cooperation with ESDC, continue implementing improvements to the Temporary Work Authorization Program.
Sub-Program 1.2.3: International Experience Canada

International Experience Canada (IEC) is a cultural exchange program that permits Canadians and foreign nationals, aged 18-35, to travel and work in other countries for six months to two years at a time. Foreign participants are issued work permits that are exempt from the requirement of an LMIA on the basis that their work in Canada creates or maintains reciprocal employment for Canadians in other countries. Some foreign participants will also be eligible to apply for permanent residence under the CEC or other programs, thereby contributing to Canada’s permanent economic immigration objectives. Young Canadian participants in other countries obtain foreign work experience, which benefits their future careers in the Canadian workplace and contributes to Canada’s international competitiveness. Exchanges with foreign countries contribute to national interests by strengthening Canada’s bilateral relations and supporting Canada’s economic and trade agenda. Most IEC exchanges occur through bilateral reciprocal Youth Mobility Agreements (YMAs) with other countries. CIC sets the maximum number of foreign national participants it will permit annually, and on an annual basis negotiates bilateral quotas with each country with which Canada has a YMA. The “Participation Fee” paid by approved foreign participants generates revenue to completely fund program costs. Key program activities include YMA negotiation and liaison with new and existing countries; promotion of program participation to Canadians and foreign nationals; and stakeholder engagement to facilitate participation and enhance program accessibility for Canadian youth. Foreign national participant application selection and processing involves the issuance of temporary resident visas and work permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants. Canadians’ applications are processed by the governments of the countries where they would like to participate.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2015–16 
Planned Spending
2016–17 
Planned Spending
2017–18 
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 9,937,812 9,937,812 9,937,812
Respendable Revenue (9,937,812) (9,937,812) (9,937,812)
Net Revenue 0 0 0
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
54 54 53
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Exchanges of Canadian and foreign participants are reciprocal Ratio of IEC foreign participants to Canadian participants 2:1 2019
Foreign exchange participants are low-risk (including for immigration violations and to the safety and security of Canada) Work permit approval rates of IEC foreign national applicants relative to work permit approval rate of all foreign national applicants ≥ 11% End of each calendar year
The skills of selected IEC participants are retained through transition to permanent residence in support of the long-term economic goals of Canada Number of former IEC foreign participants transitioning to permanent residence as principal applicants in economic immigration categories 1,000 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue strong engagement with key stakeholders to benefit from their resources and networks to promote IEC participation to Canadian youth, and to work towards increased reciprocity.

Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted

CIC is committed to upholding Canada’s humanitarian tradition of reuniting families, resettling refugees and providing protection to those in need.

The Family Class, as set forth in IRPA, allows permanent residents and Canadian citizens to sponsor their immediate family members (i.e., their spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, and dependent children), as well as parents and grandparents, for immigration to Canada. The permanent resident or Canadian citizen must undertake to provide for the basic needs of their sponsored relative for a set period of time, depending on the nature of the relationship. This program facilitates family reunification while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public.

As a signatory to the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, the 1967 Protocol, and the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, and further to provisions set forth in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Canada has international and domestic legal obligations to provide safe haven to individuals in need of protection. Canada meets these obligations through the in-Canada refugee protection system. In addition, Canada partners with other countries and with international and civil society organizations to come to the aid of refugees in need of protection through resettlement. Every year, Canada resettles 10,000 to 14,000 refugees, and is one of the top three resettlement countries globally. CIC engages both domestic and international stakeholders to develop and implement timely, efficient and effective refugee protection policies and programs.

Benefits for Canadians

CIC plays a significant role in upholding Canada’s international humanitarian commitments and domestic obligations and Canada’s reputation with regard to refugees and in promoting the Canadian values of democracy, freedom, human rights and the rule of law. Through family sponsorship, CIC’s efforts enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents to reunite with family members. Following recent reforms, CIC’s refugee protection system ensures fast and fair review and decisions for those in genuine need of protection, and deters unfounded claims by minimizing factors that may attract refugee claims from persons who are not genuinely in need of protection. The refugee resettlement program is part of the important role that Canada plays in addressing international humanitarian crises and contributes to the safety and security of Canadians.

Program 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration

CIC’s family and discretionary programs support the Government of Canada’s social goals for immigration. The program’s objectives are to reunite family members in Canada, and to allow for the processing of exceptional cases. Family Class provisions of IRPA enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada to apply to sponsor eligible members of the Family Class, including spouses and partners, dependent children, and parents and grandparents. Discretionary provisions in the legislation are used in cases where there are humanitarian and compassionate considerations or for public policy reasons. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional and deserving cases not anticipated in the legislation and to support the Government of Canada in its humanitarian response to world events and crises. Eligibility assessment and processing involve the granting of permanent or temporary residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
37,572,058 37,572,058 37,980,719 37,588,379
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
353 353 347
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Canada reunites families in Canada and provides residence in Canada for deserving cases in exceptional considerationsFootnote B Number of admissions for total Family Class, humanitarian and compassionate grounds, and public policy grounds 66,900–73,200 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Monitor and assess family and discretionary programs, in particular continue to improve program integrity and process applications as efficiently as possible within approved levels for social immigration.
Sub-Program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification

The objective of this program is to grant permanent resident status to foreign nationals who are the sponsored spouses, partners and dependent children (including adopted children) of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This supports the government’s objective to reunite close family members while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. The sponsor, who is a permanent resident or Canadian citizen, is responsible for providing the basic needs of his or her spouse or partner for three years, and for their dependent children for up to 10 years. Processing involves determining the sponsor’s ability to meet the sponsorship obligations and verifying the bona fides of the relationships. Given the close family relationships involved, these family members are the highest priority for processing. Eligibility assessment and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
21,402,960 21,164,097 20,923,392
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
186 181 178
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Spouses, partners and children are reunited with their sponsor in Canada Number of admissions of spouses, partners and children 45,000–48,000 End of each calendar year
Reunification applications for immediate family members are processed within published service standards Percentage adherence to the 12-month service standard for cases processed overseas 80% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights
  • Work towards further strengthening the integrity of family sponsorship, including through enhanced protection for vulnerable women in the immigration system.
  • Continue to manage the program by processing applications within approved levels for sponsored spouses, partners and children, maximizing family reunification based on program criteria.
Sub-Program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification

The objective of this program is to grant permanent resident status to sponsored foreign nationals who are the parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This program makes it possible for Canadian citizens and permanent residents to be reunited with their extended family members, while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. Sponsors must demonstrate, on the basis of three years of Canada Revenue Agency documentation, that they meet minimum necessary income thresholds to sponsor, and can meet their sponsorship obligations (which include providing for the basic needs of their parents and grandparents for 20 years). These requirements, together with this category’s lower processing priority, distinguish it from the spouses, partners and dependent children category. Processing involves the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
8,796,393 8,697,273 8,609,996
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
85 83 81
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Parents and grandparents are reunited with their sponsor in Canada Number of admissions of parents and grandparents 18,000–20,000 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to manage the program by processing applications within approved levels for sponsored parents and grandparents.
Sub-Program 2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations

The humanitarian and compassionate and public policy provisions of IRPA enable the Minister to address exceptional circumstances by granting an exception to certain criteria or obligations of the Act or by granting permanent or temporary residence. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional cases that were not envisioned in the legislation. Under the humanitarian and compassionate provisions of IRPA, an applicant’s circumstances are assessed on a case-by-case basis, taking into account establishment in Canada, the best interests of a child, and other relevant circumstances brought forward for consideration. The public policy provision is a discretionary tool designed to grant permanent or temporary resident status to individuals in similar circumstances, all of whom must meet eligibility criteria defined in the public policy. The outcome of this program is that exceptional cases are treated with appropriate flexibility, in accordance with Canadian values. Eligibility assessment and processing involve the granting of permanent or temporary residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
7,372,705 8,119,349 8,054,991
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
82 89 88
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
On an exceptional basis, persons are admitted or are allowed to remain in Canada and acquire permanent resident status Number of persons granted permanent resident status on humanitarian and compassionate or public policy grounds due to their exceptional circumstances 3,900–5,200 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Review, when required, the use of public policy and discretionary program authorities to address circumstances not described by requirements of other programs.

Program 2.2: Refugee Protection

The Refugee Protection Program is in the first instance about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted. One arm of the program starts overseas, where refugees and persons in refugee-like situations are selected by Canadian visa officers to be resettled as permanent residents to Canada. Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, the in-Canada asylum system evaluates the claims of individuals seeking asylum in Canada and grants protected person status when a positive decision is rendered by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
30,059,852 30,059,852 20,357,936 20,153,863

Reduction in planned spending for this program is mainly attributable to the sunset of funding for a Ministerial Reviews and Intervention pilot for In-Canada Asylum and potential transfer of responsibilities, and associated funding, to the IRB for the Pre-removal Risk Assessment function.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
311 194 190
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Canada protects refugees in need of resettlement Percentage of resettled refugees in the world that Canada resettles (dependent on actions of other countries) 8–12% End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to strengthen the integrity of Canada’s refugee system by collaborating with domestic and international partners to provide protection to those who need it in a timely manner and to deter abuse.
Sub-Program 2.2.1: Government-Assisted Refugees

Working closely with the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and other referral agencies, Canadian visa officers within the Government-Assisted Refugees (GAR) Program identify and select as permanent residents, members of the Convention Refugees Abroad class for resettlement in Canada when there is no other durable solution available within a reasonable period of time. The primary objectives of the program are to provide individual protection solutions to refugees, to affirm Canada’s humanitarian commitment to assist refugees in need of international protection through the provision of government assistance, and to assist the countries hosting them through responsibility sharing.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
5,267,340 5,777,824 5,701,440
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
38 42 41
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
GARs are granted protection and resettled to Canada Number of admissions of resettled GARs 5,800–6,500 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Oversee the implementation of Canada’s multilateral and multiyear commitments for the resettlement of GARs.
Sub-Program 2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees

The primary objective of the Privately Sponsored Refugees (PSR) Program is to partner with civil society to provide durable solutions to more refugees than would otherwise be admitted under the GAR Program. Canadian visa officers select as permanent residents members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad classes for resettlement in Canada who are referred by private sponsors. These private sponsors then provide the social, financial and emotional support to the refugees upon their arrival in Canada. The program is unique as it engages ordinary Canadians and permanent residents in Canada’s international refugee protection efforts and ensures an additional number of refugees are offered protection over and above those sponsored by the government.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
4,010,873 4,382,234 4,337,221
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
37 41 40
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
 PSRs are granted protection and resettled to Canada Number of admissions of resettled PSRs 4,500–6,500 End of each calendar year
Private sponsors participate in PSR resettlement Number of approved PSR sponsorship applications 5,000–5,700 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to work with sponsors to manage the PSR Program inventory of applications to enhance its responsiveness to protection needs.
Sub-Program 2.2.3: Blended Visa Office Referred Refugees

Working closely with the UNHCR, Canadian visa officers identify and select as permanent residents, members of the Convention Refugees Abroad class for resettlement in Canada when there is no other durable solution available within a reasonable period of time. Refugees referred by the visa office are matched with a private sponsor and, upon arrival in Canada, receive six months of income support from the Government of Canada via the Resettlement Assistance Program and six months of income support from their sponsor. Private sponsors also provide arrival and orientation services, temporary accommodation, and ongoing emotional and social support for 12 months. The program is a unique public-private partnership that encourages faith-based, ethnocultural and other community organizations in Canada to play a larger role in offering durable solutions to refugees found to be in need of resettlement by the UNHCR, supporting the objectives of both the GAR and PSR programs.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
20156–2017
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
286,011 282,707 280,307
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
3 3 3
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Blended Visa office-referred refugees (BVORs) are granted protection and resettled to Canada Number of admissions 700–1,000 End of each calendar year
Private sponsors participate in BVOR resettlement Number of approved BVOR sponsorship applications 700–1,000 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Increase engagement with private sponsors as CIC continues to implement and manage the BVOR Program.
Sub-Program 2.2.4: In-Canada Asylum

Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, Canada’s asylum system provides protection to persons fleeing persecution and risk of torture, risk to life, or risk of cruel treatment or punishment, by way of legislative and regulatory measures that enable Canada to meet those obligations. The program establishes fair and efficient procedures that uphold Canada’s respect for the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all human beings, while maintaining the overall integrity of the Canadian refugee determination system. Canada’s asylum system ensures that fair consideration is granted to those who come to Canada claiming persecution. Those found by the IRB to be in need of refugee protection receive protected person status, and may apply for permanent residence.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
15,073,049 9,915,171 9,834,895

Reduction in planned spending for this program is mainly attributable to the sunset of funding for a Ministerial Reviews and Intervention pilot for In-Canada Asylum.


Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
173 108 106
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Protected persons in-Canada and their dependants abroad are admitted as permanent residents Number of admissions of protected persons in-Canada and their dependants abroad 10,000–11,000 End of each calendar year
Decisions made on eligibility of in-Canada refugee claims are rendered within three working days Percentage of decisions on eligibility of refugee claims rendered within three working days ≥ 97% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to coordinate the implementation of reforms brought about by the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act across all partner departments to ensure that the in-Canada asylum system meets its strategic objectives.
  • Continue to monitor countries for the purpose of Designated Country of Origin (DCO) designations.
  • Continue to monitor and assess the refugee status determination system to support the three-year evaluation and make recommendations on program design improvements.
Sub-Program 2.2.5: Pre-removal Risk Assessment

In accordance with its commitment to the principle of non-refoulement, CIC offers a risk assessment before removing a person from Canada. Under IRPA, people who have been issued a removal order can apply to CIC for a pre-removal risk assessment (PRRA). When a person has already had a refugee protection claim assessed by the IRB, only new evidence, such as evidence that demonstrates a sudden change in country conditions, is considered. While some persons whose applications are approved may benefit from a stay of removal, others whose applications are approved may become “protected persons” and may apply and be granted permanent resident status. For most claimants, only one PRRA is allowed in a 12-month period – in other words, a claimant cannot apply for a PRRA for one year following a final decision on a refugee claim from the IRB or a final PRRA decision. For claimants from designated countries of origin, the bar on accessing a PRRA is 36 months.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
5,422,579 - -

Planned Spending reflects a future transfer (date to be determined) of the Pre-removal Risk Assessment function to the IRB.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
60 - -
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
PRRA decisions are made in compliance with IRPA Percentage of PRRA decisions returned to CIC by the Federal Court for redetermination < 1% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to monitor country conditions for the purpose of exceptions to the bar on accessing PRRA and DCO designations.

Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society

Through the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, IRPA and the Citizenship Act, as well as a broader constitutional and legislative suite that includes the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canadian Human Rights Act, the Official Languages Act and the Employment Equity Act among others, the Government of Canada is committed to facilitating the participation of all Canadians in the social, cultural, economic and civic spheres of Canadian society. Accordingly, the focus of this strategic outcome is on a “two-way street” approach that works with communities and Canadian institutions to assist individuals to become active, connected and productive citizens.

Working with a wide range of social supports, including other levels of government, voluntary sector and community partners, employers, school boards and others, CIC seeks to strengthen social integration by providing newcomers with tools to fully participate in the labour market; promoting social and cultural connections; encouraging active civic participation; and fostering a sense of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

Benefits for Canadians

Canadians enjoy a higher quality of life when citizens and newcomers actively participate in all aspects of society; contribute to a prosperous economy; and have a strong sense of civic pride and attachment.

Program 3.1: Newcomer Settlement and Integration

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Employment Equity Act and IRPA, programming is developed based on policies that support the settlement, resettlement, adaptation and integration of newcomers into Canadian society. All permanent residents are eligible for settlement and integration programs. Programming is delivered by third parties (including provincial and municipal governments, school boards and post-secondary institutions, settlement service organizations and other non-governmental actors, and the private sector) across the country.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
1,014,017,140 1,014,017,140 1,014,602,101 1,014,356,750
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
325 318 311
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
NewcomersFootnote C contribute to Canada’s economic, social and cultural development Percentage difference of labour force participation of newcomers residing in Canada 10 years or less, in comparison with the Canadian-born (for core working age, 25-54 years) ≤ -12% End of each calendar year
Percentage difference of newcomers who are 15 years and older, who in the past 12 months volunteered, or participated at least monthly in a group, association or organization, in comparison with the Canadian-born population -10% Every five years
Percentage difference of newcomers residing in Canada 10 years or less, who are 15 years and older and who have a somewhat strong or a very strong sense of belonging to Canada in comparison with the Canadian-born population ≤ -3% Every five years
Planning Highlight
  • Advance the implementation of new settlement policy directions and innovative practices to facilitate the successful integration of newcomers in Canada outside Quebec.
Sub-Program 3.1.1: Settlement

Settlement refers to a short period (three to five years) of adaptation by newcomers during which the government provides support and services. Ultimately, the goal of integration is to encourage newcomers to be fully engaged in the economic, social, political and cultural life of Canada. CIC’s Settlement Program assists immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers specific to the newcomer experience, such as a lack of official language skills, limited knowledge of Canada and the recognition of foreign credentials. The program provides language learning services for newcomers, community and employment bridging services, settlement information, and support services that facilitate access to settlement programming. Also, through the Foreign Credentials Referral Office, the program provides information, path-finding and referral services to internationally trained individuals to have their credentials assessed quickly so they can find work in the fields in which they have been trained. Most services are designed and delivered by service provider organizations; however, certain services (such as information provision) are delivered directly by CIC in Canada and overseas.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
614,370,290 614,074,971 613,864,181
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–2017 2017–18
281 274 268
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Clients make informed decisions about life in CanadaFootnote D Percentage of clients who are able to make informed decisions about life in Canada Target will be selected once the baseline data is established in 2015 Fiscal year 2016–2017
Clients use official languages to function and participate in Canadian society Average percentage of clients (landed in Canada for at least two years) who use official languages to function and participate in Canadian society Target will be selected once the baseline data is established in 2015 Fiscal year 2016–2017
Clients participate in society Percentage of clients (landed in Canada for at least one year) who participated in Canadian society in the last year Target will be selected once the baseline data is established in 2015 Fiscal year 2016–2017
Planning Highlights
Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.1: Language Training

The ability of newcomers to communicate in one of Canada’s official languages has long been recognized as key to both the initial settlement and the longer-term integration of immigrants. Language learning services are intended to help newcomers develop sufficient linguistic communication skills (including literacy) to enable newcomers to function in Canadian society and contribute to the economy. Through the Settlement Program, CIC funds service provider organizations (SPOs) to deliver various language learning services for newcomers, including language assessment and official language instruction. This program uses transfer payment funding from the Settlement Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
279,752,228 279,648,830 279,574,553
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
97 95 93
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Clients learn official language skills for adapting to Canadian society Annual percentage of language training clients who increased at least one Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) level for at least three of four skills TBD once baseline data is available in 2015 TBD
Annual percentage of language training clients who have completed CLB four or above in listening and speaking TBD once baseline data is available in 2015 TBD
Percentage of clients who reported an improvement in official language skills and attributed their improvement to CIC language training TBD once baseline data is established in 2015 TBD
Planning Highlight
  • Advance the development of a pan-Canadian Language Strategy.
Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.2: Community and Labour Market Integration Services

Newcomers face a variety of barriers to integration, including the need for information and connections to social and economic networks. Settlement information, bridging and other support services including foreign credential referrals, attempt to address these barriers. SPOs are funded to design and deliver bridging services that facilitate newcomers’ connections to the labour market and the wider community. Through CIC offices and SPOs, the program also provides prospective immigrants and newcomers with access to settlement-related information so that they can make informed decisions about immigrating to and settling in Canada. The program also funds SPOs to offer services that improve newcomers’ access to settlement programming; these support services include childminding and transportation. Information on foreign credential recognition is provided in-person and by telephone on behalf of the Foreign Credentials Referral Office by Service Canada and through the CIC Web site to prospective immigrants overseas. This program uses transfer payment funding from the Settlement Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
334,618,062 334,426,141 334,289,628
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
184 179 175
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Clients gain knowledge of life in Canada Percentage of clients who acquired knowledge about life in Canada and attributed it to government web sites or service providers TBD once the baseline data is established in 2015 Fiscal year 20162017
Clients acquire skills to function in the Canadian work environment Annual percentage of language training clients who have completed CLB four or above in listening and speaking TBD once the baseline data is established in 2015 Fiscal year 20162017
Percentage of employed clients who received CIC services and who are working in a job that either matches or is related to their skills and experience TBD once the baseline data is established in 2015 Fiscal year 20162017
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to improve and develop pre- and post-arrival initiatives and tools that support the enhanced social and economic integration of newcomers.
Sub-Program 3.1.2: Grant to Quebec

Under the Canada-Quebec Accord, signed in 1991, Canada has devolved settlement and resettlement responsibility to Quebec, with a grant that includes reasonable compensation for costs. The compensation to Quebec covers services for reception services and linguistic, cultural and economic integration services, provided that they are equivalent to similar federal services in other parts of the country. An objective of the Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec’s demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants into that province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec. The Accord provides Quebec with exclusive responsibility for the selection of immigrants destined to the province (except for family reunification and asylum seekers in Canada) as well as the reception and linguistic and cultural integration of these immigrants (including resettlement of refugees). Under the Accord, Canada is responsible for defining overall immigration objectives, national levels, admissibility, selecting family category and asylum seekers in Canada, and citizenship. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
340,568,000 340,568,000 340,568,000
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
- - -
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Quebec provides settlement and integration services to newcomers in the province that are comparable to services provided across Canada Frequency of Comité MixteFootnote E meetings 1 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue working with Quebec officials to compare settlement services for newcomers as per the terms of the Canada-Quebec Accord.
Sub-Program 3.1.3: Immigration Loan

The Immigration Loan Program is a statutory program under IRPA. It ensures that some persons, otherwise unable to pay for the costs of transportation to Canada and medical admissibility exams, have access to a funding source. Assistance loans may also be approved for newcomers in need to cover initial settlement expenses such as rental and utilities deposits. The main target groups for the program are resettled refugees. These individuals have undergone extreme hardship and most often have few personal resources and are therefore unable to access traditional lending institutions. Canadian visa officers authorize the transportation and admissibility loans and the International Organization for Migration arranges travel and medical exams for refugees and pays these costs. CIC reimburses them and the refugee reimburses CIC through loan repayments. Assistance loans are authorized by in-Canada officers. The interest-bearing loans are repayable in full and payment plans vary by the value of the loan and the recipients’ ability to repay while integrating.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
1,263,678 1,248,435 1,236,345
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
12 12 12
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Individuals in need receive and repay immigration loans Percentage of resettled refugees by family unit (i.e., principal applicants)  that receive transportation and/or admissibility loans 100% End of each calendar year
Percentage of resettled refugees by family unit (i.e., principal applicants) that receive settlement assistance loans 40% End of each calendar year
Percentage of loan recipients who repay their immigration loans within the original prescribed loan period TBD once the baseline data is established in 2015 End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue providing access to financial support through the Immigration Loan Program for resettled refugees who are in dire need.
Sub-Program 3.1.4: Resettlement Assistance Program

The Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP) provides direct financial support and immediate and essential services to RAP clients, including GARs, PSRs in blended initiatives under the BVOR Program, and persons in refugee-like situations admitted to Canada under a public policy consideration, to meet their resettlement needs. In most cases RAP clients have undergone extreme hardship and may lack the social networks and the financial resources to assist in addressing the needs associated with becoming established in a new country. Income support is administered directly by CIC to RAP clients for up to 12 months if the RAP client’s income is insufficient to meet his or her own needs and the needs of any accompanying dependents. In some cases, RAP clients also receive start-up allowances for expenses related to furniture and other household supplies. Immediate and essential services are supported through contributions to SPOs in all provinces in Canada except Quebec, which delivers similar settlement services through the Canada-Quebec Accord. RAP services include, but are not limited to, port of entry services, assistance with temporary accommodations, assistance opening a bank account, life skills training, orientation sessions, and links to settlement programming and mandatory federal and provincial programs. This program uses transfer payment funding from RAP.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
57,815,172 58,710,695 58,688,224
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
32 32 31
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
GARs have access to CIC settlement services Percentage of GARs outside Quebec who access settlement services within six months after arrival ≥ 85% End of each fiscal year
GARs have their immediate and essential needs met Percentage of GARs who report that their immediate and essential resettlement needs were met by RAP services 80% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlight
  • Enhance RAP policy and program delivery in collaboration with external stakeholders.

Program 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians

The purpose of the Citizenship Program is to administer citizenship legislation and promote the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship. CIC administers the acquisition of Canadian citizenship by developing, implementing and applying legislation, regulations and policies that protect the integrity of Canadian citizenship and allow eligible applicants to be granted citizenship or be provided with a proof of citizenship. In addition, the program promotes citizenship, to both newcomers and the Canadian-born, through various events, materials and projects. Promotional activities focus on enhancing knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions and values, as well as fostering an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
68,062,779 68,062,779 67,270,183 66,684,294
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
720 704 689
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canadian citizenship is a valued status: newcomers have a desire to become Canadian, and established Canadians are proud of their citizenship Take-up rates of citizenship among eligible newcomers ≥ 75% Calendar year 2016
Percentage of Canadians who are proud to be Canadian ≥ 80% Calendar year 2018
The integrity of Canadian citizenship is protected Percentage of applicants referred to a citizenship hearing with judges and/or citizenship officers to protect the integrity of citizenship 5–10% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlight
Sub-Program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness

The Citizenship Awareness Program aims to enhance the meaning of Canadian citizenship for both newcomers and the Canadian-born and to increase a sense of belonging to Canada. Through knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions and values, as well as the rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship, newcomers and the Canadian-born are better equipped for active citizenship and can contribute to the development of an integrated society. The program undertakes various knowledge-building and promotional activities such as: citizenship ceremonies; citizenship reaffirmation ceremonies; Citizenship Week; and the distribution of citizenship educational publications (e.g., Discover Canada: The Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship study guide, the Welcome to Canada guide). CIC also partners with the Institute for Canadian Citizenship on citizenship awareness activities. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant for the Institute for Canadian Citizenship for citizenship awareness activities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2,766,015 2,734,141 2,711,103
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
30 29 29
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Newcomers and established Canadians are made aware of responsibilities and privileges associated with Canadian citizenship Percentage of enhancedFootnote F citizenship ceremonies held in partnership with community or external organizations ≥ 15% End of each fiscal year
Percentage of applicants who write and pass the written citizenship knowledge test 80–85% End of each fiscal year
Number of Discover Canada guides distributed (printed and downloaded) ≥ 800,000 End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlight
Sub-Program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation

Citizenship processing activities include interpreting and administering the Citizenship Act and Regulations, managing the naturalization process (whereby non-citizens become citizens), issuing proof of citizenship to those who are citizens by birth or by naturalization, and maintaining these records. The processing of applications for Canadian citizenship contributes to newcomers’ abilities to participate in all aspects of Canadian life and enhances their successful integration into Canadian society. CIC reviews files particularly where there are allegations of fraud, and collects and analyses information to determine if a recommendation to initiate revocation proceedings should be made to the Minister.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
65,296,764 64,536,042 63,973,191
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
690 675 660
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Applications for proofs and grants of citizenship are processed Total number of decisions for grants of citizenship 177,780–249,410 End of each fiscal year
Total number of decisions for proofs of citizenship 55,000 End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights

Program 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Multiculturalism Program seeks to: build an integrated, socially cohesive society; improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population; and engage in discussions on multiculturalism, integration and diversity at the international level. To advance these objectives, the Multiculturalism Program: provides grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, the private sector, non-federal public institutions, and individuals; conducts direct public outreach and promotional activities; helps federal institutions to meet their obligations under the Act; supports the annual tabling in Parliament of a report on the operation of the Act; and engages non-federal public institutions seeking to respond to diversity. The Multiculturalism Program also supports Canada’s participation in international agreements and institutions.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
13,049,066 13,049,066 11,521,963 11,491,206
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
52 43 42
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Program participants are given information or tools to support an integrated society Annual percentage of program respondents who report that they are more enabled to support an integrated society ≥ 70% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlight
  • Lead an interdepartmental committee to develop the Government of Canada’s contribution and submission to the International Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.
Sub-Program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness

Multiculturalism awareness comprises a suite of policy, program, public engagement, public education and promotional activities. In addition to developing policies that shape Canada’s stance on diversity issues, grants and contributions are disbursed to successful funding applicants that seek to support the Multiculturalism Program’s objectives of building an integrated, socially cohesive society through enhanced intercultural/interfaith understanding, civic memory and pride, respect for core democratic values, and participation in society and the economy. Multiculturalism awareness also entails direct public outreach and promotional activities, designed to engage citizens and newcomers on multiculturalism issues (for example, Asian Heritage Month, Black History Month and the Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism). The Multiculturalism Awareness Program is also a locus for Canada’s participation in international agreements and institutions such as the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant in support of the Multiculturalism Program and contribution in support of the Multiculturalism Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
10,886,509 10,849,460 10,824,105
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
37 36 35
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Program participants report an increased respect for Canada’s core democratic system and values Annual percentage of program participants reporting increased respect for core democratic values ≥ 70% End of each fiscal year
Program participants report a better understanding of a religious, ethnic, or cultural group that is different from their own Annual percentage of program participants reporting increased intercultural/interfaith understanding ≥ 70% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlight
Sub-Program 3.3.2: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support

Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support efforts are directed towards improving the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population. To help federal institutions meet their obligations under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, this program leads a Multiculturalism Champions Network which serves as a forum for discussing shared challenges, best practices, lessons learned and tools to help institutions implement the Act. The program develops the Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act for tabling in Parliament, which fulfils the Minister’s obligations under the Act, and serves as an informative tool for institutions seeking best practices. Dialogue with provinces and territories is also provided through a Multiculturalism Program-led Federal-Provincial-Territorial Network of Officials Responsible for Multiculturalism Issues. Lastly, the program fosters policy relationships with the Canadian Race Relations Foundation and the Global Centre for Pluralism. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant in support of the Multiculturalism Program and contribution in support of the Multiculturalism Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2,162,557 672,503 667,101
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
15 7 7
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federal institutions report on their responsiveness to a diverse society Percentage of respondents (federal institutions) who report on their implementation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act ≥ 75% End of each fiscal year
Federal institutions are supported in meeting their obligations under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act Participation rate of federal institutions ≥ 60% End of each fiscal year
Number of support or outreach activities provided to federal institutions ≥ 5 End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights

Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians

Canada welcomes thousands of permanent residents, foreign nationals authorized for temporary work, international students and visitors each year. CIC manages the movement of people within the context of a more responsive immigration system that benefits Canada’s economic, social and cultural development while at the same time protecting the health, safety and security of all Canadians. CIC also ensures that Canadians can travel freely across international borders by abiding by international standards and specifications and applying rigour in the administration and monitoring of Canada’s Passport Program. To manage health issues related to immigration, CIC develops and implements risk mitigation strategies in cooperation with the Public Health Agency of Canada, provinces and territories, and partner countries. Any residual public health risks regarding the transmission of infectious diseases are mitigated through medical surveillance of newly arrived permanent and temporary residents as required. To protect Canadians—and to ensure that the benefits of a more responsive immigration system are not undermined—CIC works with the Canada Border Services Agency, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service to conduct appropriate background screening of both immigrants and temporary residents and to identify applicants who could pose a security risk to the country. CIC shares information with these organizations, fostering timely and effective delivery of its program.

Internationally, migration and humanitarian issues continue to gain the attention of governments, bilateral and multilateral forums, non-governmental organizations, and academic and other research institutes. CIC plays an important role in framing and advancing international dialogues on migration and integration policy, refugee protection and governance. These dialogues explore the links between migration policy and development assistance, health, the environment, trade, and the movement of human capital. CIC works to develop and implement a strategic agenda on global migration and refugee protection, and to advance Canada’s policy and program priorities.

Benefits for Canadians

Growing international migration has increased the possibility of Canadians being exposed to disease outbreaks and infectious diseases. CIC and its partners in health management work to reduce the impact of identified risks on the Canadian population.

Policies and programs that affect the international movement of people—across Canada’s borders and outside them—have a direct bearing on the safety and security of Canada and Canadians at large, whether they are at home, travelling and/or conducting trade abroad. Working in collaboration with domestic and international partners, CIC strives to achieve an effective balance between security and facilitation through the use and application of recognized identity management and travel document standards and specifications. Strengthening Canada’s refugee programs and demonstrating continued leadership in refugee protection, human rights and the promotion of cultural diversity through active participation in various international and regional forums and partnerships support Canada’s broader contribution to a safe and secure world. Finally, coordinated and responsible sharing of information supports a fast response to threats to the safety and security of Canadians.

Program 4.1: Health Protection

This program aims to provide effective immigration health services to manage the health aspect of migrant entry and settlement to Canada, and facilitate the arrival of resettled refugees to Canada and their integration while contributing to the protection of the health and safety of all Canadians and contributing to the maintenance of sustainable Canadian health and social services.

The program aims to evaluate health risks related to immigration and coordinate with international and Canadian health partners to develop risk management strategies and processes to assess the health risks posed by applicants wishing to immigrate to Canada. The strategies, processes and interventions are intended to reduce the impact of the risks identified on the health of Canadians and on Canada’s health and social services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Planned Spending
63,217,689 63,217,689 61,803,321 61,705,775
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
116 112 110
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Immigration health services are in place to protect public health and public safety and the burden on the health system Percentage of permanent residents with a valid immigration medical assessment (IMA) at landingFootnote G 100% Calendar year 2015
Eligible clients receive coverage for health services under the Interim Federal Health (IFH) Program Percentage of eligible clients who receive health coverage under the IFH Program 100% Calendar year 2014
Planning Highlight
  • Develop proposals for the realignment of health admissibility towards a more evidence- and risk-based approach.
Sub-Program 4.1.1: Health Screening

This program aims to manage the health risks related to permanent and temporary residence according to the three grounds for inadmissibility under IRPA, which are (1) danger to public health, (2) danger to public safety and (3) excessive demand on health or social services.

The IME is a tool used to screen for infectious diseases of public health significance in all applicants for permanent and temporary residence. It includes x-rays and lab tests that identify applicants who could pose health threats to Canadians or to the Canadian health and social systems. Those who are considered admissible on health grounds are cleared for entry into Canada; those who are found with infectious disease of public health significance are referred for treatment, where relevant, before admittance to Canada; those who are a danger to public health or public safety or are deemed to cause excessive demand on Canada’s health and social system are deemed inadmissible.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
8 829 681 7 478 194 7 426 728
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2018–2019
77 75 74
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Applicants for permanent and temporary residence who pose a risk to public health and/or public safety and/or may be reasonably expected to cause excessive demand on the Canadian social and/or health-care systems are identified Percentage of applicants that should be identified as inadmissible based on the IME results, and that are coded as inadmissible by CIC medical staff 100% Calendar year 2016
Percentage of new cases of inactive tuberculosis (TB) found during an IMA over total number of IMAs 1.5%–2% Calendar year 2014
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to screen applicants for medical conditions that are likely to endanger public health and safety or to cause excessive demand on health and social services.
Sub-Program 4.1.2: Medical Surveillance and Notification

Section 38(1) of IRPA sets danger to public health as one key condition of inadmissibility to Canada.

Applicants for temporary or permanent residence in Canada whose Immigration Medical Assessments (IMAs) demonstrate that they may pose risks to public health require further health assessment and monitoring following their landing in Canada in order to ensure that they do not represent a danger to public health.

The Medical Surveillance and Notification Program informs provincial and territorial public health authorities of applicants who require medical surveillance in order to ensure that the terms and conditions of landing are met.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
1,609,584 1,591,941 1,580,616
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
19 18 18
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Provincial and territorial public health authorities are notified, for the purposes of medical surveillance, of migrants who pose public health risks Percentage of migrants identified as having inactive TB who landed in Canada and were reported to provincial or territorial health authorities 100% Calendar year 2014
Percentage of identified cases of human immunodeficiency virus who landed in Canada and were reported to provincial or territorial health authorities (except for Nova Scotia and Nunavut—which elected to not receive the information) 100% Calendar year 2014
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to report to Canadian provincial and territorial public health authorities approved applicants with a condition requiring medical surveillance, upon their arrival in Canada.
Sub-Program 4.1.3: Interim Federal Health

The Interim Federal Health (IFH) Program provides limited, temporary coverage of health-care costs, under the authority of an Order in Council. The target population includes resettled refugees, protected persons, refugee claimants, and persons detained under IRPA. In general, eligibility and level of coverage under the IFH Program are determined by the beneficiary’s status in Canada. The program offers five types of coverage: Expanded Health Coverage, Health-Care Coverage, Public Health or Public Safety Health-Care Coverage, coverage for the IME and coverage for detainees. Most beneficiaries receive Health-Care Coverage, which is a level of coverage similar to the coverage Canadians receive through their provincial/territorial health insurance plans. The program helps protect public health and public safety and supports the successful settlement of resettled refugees receiving government support. IFH Program beneficiaries with valid coverage access health services through registered health care providers, who are reimbursed directly by the IFH claims administrator for covered services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
52,778,424 52,733,186 52,698,431
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
20 19 18
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Eligible clients receive health services that reduce risks to the health and safety of Canadians Percentage of refugee claimants who received an IME covered by the IFH Program 100% End of each fiscal year

Percentage of IFH Program beneficiaries by coverage type who obtain health services that reduce risk to public health and public safety

  1. Public Health or Public Safety Health Care Coverage (PHPSHCC)
  2. Expanded Health Care Coverage (EHCC)
  3. Health Care Coverage (HCC)
  1. PHPSHCC: 100%
  2. EHCC: 44.9%
  3. HCC: 71%
End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to implement the IFH Program in accordance with the Government’s direction.

Program 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management

CIC facilitates the travel of bona fide permanent residents, visitors, students and temporary workers while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians by effectively managing migration access and controlling entry. This is accomplished through a variety of policy and operational measures, including through the establishment of visa and other document entry requirements and otherwise maintaining the policy framework for terms and conditions of entry, admissibility criteria, anti-fraud measures, negotiations of bilateral and multilateral information-sharing agreements and treaties, as well as setting identity management practices. Strategic partnership engagements with security and public safety-related departments are another essential component of this program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
124,537,482 124,537,482 120,437,839 118,721,869
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
809 786 770
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
A managed migration of people to Canada that facilitates the movement of legitimate travellers, while denying entry to Canada at the earliest point possible to those who pose a safety or security risk, or are otherwise inadmissible under IRPA Number of refused electronic travel authorizations TBD once baseline established in 2016 Five years after project implementation
Number of temporary resident biometric enrolments that matched to existing Canadian records (i.e., immigration, refugee or criminal biometric records) TBD based on baseline established in first evaluation in 20152016 Five years after project implementation
Planning Highlights
  • Facilitate information sharing with federal, provincial and territorial partners.
  • Continue implementation and monitoring of biometric screening for temporary residents.
  • Monitor and report on the implementation of the electronic travel authorization.
Sub-Program 4.2.1: Permanent Resident Status Documents

In accordance with IRPA, CIC must process and issue to all permanent residents a secure status document for travel purposes. The permanent resident card serves as proof of permanent resident status in Canada and may be easily verified by commercial carriers and border officers. While the permanent resident card also meets international travel document standards, it is not a travel document. The Permanent Resident Status Documents Program makes it difficult to access Canadian territory fraudulently. The program establishes a mechanism to verify compliance with the residency requirement, provides permanent residents with a status document confirming their right to live, work and study in Canada, provides permanent residents with access to government services, and enables them to be recognized and processed quickly at the border, thereby enhancing border security. While not mandatory within Canada, the permanent resident card is required for all permanent residents as proof of their status when seeking to re-enter Canada on a commercial carrier. It contains security features to reduce the risk of fraud. Permanent residents who obtained their status under previous immigration legislation or those who wish to replace an expired, lost or stolen permanent resident card may obtain one upon application. Limited use travel documents are also issued by visa offices overseas to qualified permanent residents outside of Canada who do not have a valid permanent resident card, to facilitate return travel to Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
16,877,123 16,656,377 16,455,404
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
138 135 132
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Permanent residents have required documentation to re-enter Canada Number of phase one (new) permanent resident (PR) cards issued ≥ 240,000 End of each fiscal year
Number of phase two (renewal / replacement) PR cards issued ≥ 140,000 End of each fiscal year
Number of PR travel documents issued 10,000–20,000 End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlight
Sub-Program 4.2.2: Visitors Status

Under IRPA, all visitors to Canada require a temporary resident visa (TRV), except citizens of countries for which an exemption has been granted under the Regulations. A foreign national who wishes to come to Canada, and from a country for which a TRV is imposed, needs to apply at a Canadian embassy abroad prior to travelling to Canada. The Visitors Status Program aims to ensure that each applicant is screened to determine whether they meet the entry requirements, including that they will abide by the terms and conditions of entry, and are not inadmissible to Canada. The screening of travellers requiring a TRV is carried out by CIC in cooperation with its federal security partners. Once individuals arrive in Canada, their status needs to be maintained, regardless of whether they needed a visa to enter the country.
The TRV is designed to prevent individuals who would abuse temporary entry from coming to Canada, and to facilitate the entry to Canada of genuine temporary residents. The requirement to obtain a TRV limits the number of immigration violations (e.g., refugee claims, no proper travel documents, not leaving Canada once the period of stay has expired, working illegally, etc.) and protects the health, safety and security of Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
57,399,595 57,491,596 56,668,940
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
381 373 365
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote H Date to be Achieved
Visitors have been screened to ensure they do not pose a risk to the health, safety and security of Canadians Percentage of TRV applications approved/refused

Approved: 83%

Refused: 17%

End of each calendar year

Percentage of refused TRV applications based on the following grounds:

  1. health,
  2. criminality,
  3. security
  1. < 0.1%
  2. < 0.1%
  3. < 0.1%
End of each calendar year
Percentage of refugee claims made by persons subject to a TRV requirement relative to TRV approvals

1%

End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Ensure that legitimate travellers to Canada are approved to enter the country, while denying access to those who pose a threat.
Sub-Program 4.2.3: Temporary Resident Permits

Persons seeking temporary residence in Canada who do not meet IRPA requirements are subject to refusal of a TRV abroad, denial of entry at ports of entry, or refusal of extensions inland. In some cases, however, there may be compelling reasons for an officer to issue a temporary resident permit (TRP) to allow a person who is otherwise inadmissible to enter or remain in Canada. Under the TRP Program, designated officers may issue these permits abroad, at a port of entry or in Canada, depending on the circumstances. Grounds for issuance of a TRP include, among others, inadmissibility due to medical reasons, criminality, reasons of security, infringement of human or international rights, or organized crime. TRPs are issued for a limited, often short, period of time and are subject to cancellation at any time. TRPs provide officers with the flexibility to address exceptional circumstances and, in so doing, maintain the integrity of Canada’s immigration program and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2,765,935 2,734,518 2,709,082
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
28 27 27
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators TargetsFootnote I Date to be Achieved
People seeking to enter or remain in Canada who would otherwise be inadmissible are granted a TRPFootnote J Percentage of TRPs issued for security, organized crime, war crimes and/or crimes against humanity 0.75–1.0% End of each calendar year
Percentage of TRPs issued for criminality and/or serious criminality 57.5–62.5% End of each calendar year
Percentage of TRPs issued for other inadmissibilities or non-compliance 38–42% End of each calendar year
Planning Highlight
  • Continue to issue TRPs on a case-by-case basis to allow persons who are otherwise inadmissible to enter or remain in Canada.
Sub-Program 4.2.4: Fraud Prevention and Program Integrity Protection

Under this program, operational policy is developed and procedures are designed in order to maintain confidence in Canada’s citizenship and immigration system and to protect the safety and security of Canada while effectively delivering on economic and social objectives by selecting only those applicants that meet program requirements. Program integrity is achieved through case processing procedures that identify and refuse status to applicants who fail to meet eligibility and/or admissibility requirements, including fraud, and through referral of these cases for enforcement action where appropriate.

Identity management contributes to strengthened program integrity by ensuring that services are delivered to the correct individual, developing efficiencies across multiple business lines, and allowing CIC to streamline interactions with repeat clientele. Identity management involves the application of procedures to establish, fix and manage client identity across CIC operations and between key partners based on personal identifiers, identity documents and biometrics identifiers.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
47,403,521 43,465,061 42,798,843
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
261 250 245
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The integrity of Canada’s citizenship and immigration programs is assured Percentage of applications processed (as complex or non-complex) for which risk indicator criteria have been applied in processing (citizenship, permanent resident, and temporary resident applications) over total number of applications processed in these lines of business 50% Calendar year 2015
Percentage of refused cases over the total number of applications processed for Family Class spouses 8%Footnote K Calendar year 2015
Percentage of refused cases over the total number of applications processed for TRVs 16%Footnote K Calendar year 2015
Planning Highlight
  • Continue, as part of CIC’s modernization agenda, to enhance program integrity by developing and improving tools to support staff, and develop and participate in program integrity activities. 
Sub-Program 4.2.5: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants

The Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants (GAIM) Program provides transfer payments in the form of contributions to trusted international, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations (such as the International Organization for Migration) to fund activities and support for intercepted irregular migrants, such as meeting basic needs, providing medical care, identifying migrants to be referred to the appropriate authorities for refugee status determination, and facilitating voluntary return and reintegration in the country of origin if determined not to be in need of protection. The GAIM Program responds to the need for Canada to have a permanent program to manage the consequences of disrupting human-smuggling activities believed to be destined for Canada. It is triggered when the Prime Minister’s Special Advisor on Human Smuggling identifies an event involving these activities and CIC agrees to implement the program. It also addresses the need for complementary activities that demonstrate Canada’s commitment to transit states and international partners that would otherwise be encumbered with the costs of unintended consequences arising from smuggling-prevention activities. Offers of capacity building and support in managing the consequences of successful prevention of human smuggling have been critical in securing bilateral cooperation from transit states. The GAIM Program reflects CIC’s role in Canada’s whole-of-government strategy to combat human-smuggling activities. The program uses transfer payment funding from the contribution in support of the GAIM Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
91,308 90,287 89,600
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
1 1 1
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Migrants who are determined not to be refugees reintegrate in their countries of origin Percentage of migrants who received assistance to establish a business are “very satisfied,” “satisfied” or “moderately satisfied” with the performance of their businessFootnote L 90% End of each fiscal year
Percentage of migrants surveyed who received reintegration assistance who are “positive” about their future in their home country 80% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlight
  • The GAIM Program responds to irregular (i.e., unexpected) migration events. As such, is not possible to identify planning highlights for 2015–2016.

Program 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

As part of its mandate, CIC aims to influence the international migration and integration policy agenda. This is done by developing and promoting, together with other public policy sectors, Canada’s position on international migration, integration and refugee protection issues, and through participation in multilateral, regional and bilateral forums.

CIC works closely with partner countries to ensure the effective administration of immigration laws through the exchange of information, including biometric data. This international migration policy development helps Canada advance its interests in the context of international migration as well as meet its international obligations and commitments.

CIC supports international engagement and partnerships through membership in and contributions to such organizations as the International Organization for Migration, Regional Conference on Migration, the UNHCR Global Forum on Migration and Development, and Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees. The program uses transfer payment funding from the following programs: grant for Migration Policy Development; annual assessed contributions for the International Organization for Migration; and annual assessed contributions for the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) formerly called the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research (ITF).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
5,177,541 5,177,541 5,284,973 5,255,778
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
37 36 36
Performance Measurement
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Canadian positions on managed migration, integration, and international protection are advanced in international fora Percentage of decisions/reports from international meetings and fora identified as importantFootnote M that reflect the delivered CIC migration-related position. 60% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to ensure coherence between CIC’s international engagement and its international priorities.
  • Build on existing relationships with international organizations such as the International Organization for Migration, and contribute to international meetings, such as the Global Forum on Migration and Development and others.

Program 4.4: Passport

CIC is accountable for the Passport Program, and collaborates with Service Canada and Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada for the delivery of passport services. The program is managed through a revolving fund. The program enables the issuance of secure Canadian travel documents through authentication of identity and entitlement, facilitates travel, and contributes to international and domestic security.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
  2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
Gross Expenditures 437,218,910 437,218,910 460,977,181 466,866,442
Respendable Revenue (639,372,387) (639,372,387) (669,654,538) (662,959,687)
Net Revenue (202,153,477) (202,153,477) (208,677,357) (196,093,245)
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
782 762 741
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Legitimate travellers are in possession of Canadian travel documents Number of confirmed identity fraud cases known to the Passport Program in a given year TBD once baseline established in 2015 End of each calendar year
Passport Program meets the needs of Canadian travel document holders Percentage of clients who report they have been satisfied with services they have received 90% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights

Strengthen the security and integrity of the Passport Program by:

  • migrating the passport issuance system  into CIC’s Global Case Management System;
  • using risk-based analysis and integrity tools to facilitate the decision-making process;
  • developing mechanisms with provincial/territorial vital statistics agencies to establish linkages; and
  • advancing domestic and international Passport Program policies and regulations to facilitate travel.

Improve the service experience for passport applicants by:

  • aligning the service delivery model with the implementation of modernization initiatives; and 
  • developing an online service channel for the Passport Program and beginning its phased implementation.

Program 5.1: Internal Services

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2015–16
Main Estimates
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
187,702,906 187,702,906 180,737,881 178,684,331
Human Resources (FTEs)
2015–16 2016–17 2017–18
1,585 1,549 1,516
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to upgrade departmental information technology applications to adapt to new service delivery models and better manage information.
  • Continue to ensure a strong, credible internal auditing regime that contributes directly to sound risk management, control and governance, and is independent from line management.
  • Continue to improve departmental management practices, accountability and compliance.
  • Continue transforming the delivery of internal services.
  • Build a high-performing, adaptable and diverse work force while fostering a healthy and supportive workplace.
  • Continue to implement all aspects of CIC’s Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, details of which can be found in the Supplementary Information tables.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Consolidated Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The consolidated future-oriented condensed statement of operations provides a general overview of Citizenship and Immigration Canada’s (CIC) operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the consolidated future-oriented condensed statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Report on Plans and Priorities are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts differ.

A more detailed consolidated future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on CIC’s Web site.

Consolidated Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31 (dollars)
Financial Information 2014–15
Estimated Results
2015–16
Planned Results
Difference
Total expenses 2,401,232,181 2,361,715,328 (39,516,853)
Total revenues 683,678,622 649,310,199 (34,368,423)
Net cost of operations 1,717,553,559 1,712,405,129 (5,148,430)

The total departmental expenses are expected to decrease by $39.5 million or 1.6% from $2.40 billion in 2014–2015 to $2.36 billion in 2015–2016. This largely reflects the Department’s efforts to manage costs.

The chart below outlines CIC’s planned expenses by program for 2015–2016:

Chart described below
Text version: Planned Expenses by Program

The pie chart shows a breakdown of Planned Expenses by Program. The table below provides the percentages as indicated in the pie chart.

Planned Expenses by Program Percentage
Settlement and Integration of Newcomers 43%
Passport 19%
Migration Control and Security Management 9%
Permanent Economic Residents 4%
Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 4%
Family and Discretionary Immigration 3%
Temporary Economic Residents 3%
Health Protection 3%
Internal Services 9%
OtherFootnote N 3%
TOTAL 100%

Total departmental revenues are expected to decrease by $34 million or 5% from $683 million in 2014 2015 to $649 million in 2014–2015. This reduction is attributable to a volume shift in forecasted demand for the Passport Program.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2015–2016 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on CIC’s Web site:

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy;
  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More;
  • Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs Under $5 Million;
  • Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects;
  • Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations Over the Next Three Fiscal Years;  
  • Up-Front Multi-Year Funding; and
  • Users Fees and Regulatory Charges.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

For any additional information, on this report or other parliamentary reports for CIC, please contact ParliamentaryReports-RapportsParlementaires@cic.gc.ca.

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation: Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures: Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report: Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full-time equivalent: Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes: A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure: A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures: Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance: What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator: A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting: The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending: For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans: The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities: Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program: A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture: A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities: Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

results: An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

Strategic Outcome: A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program: A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target: A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

whole-of-government framework: Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Date Modified: