Report on Plans and Priorities 2016–2017

Table of Contents


Minister’s Message

The 2016–2017 Report on Plans and Priorities for the Department of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) is my first report since becoming Minister. It also marks the first report under the Department’s new name, which reflects the fact that welcoming refugees is a rich legacy of our country’s history, and will continue to be an important component of building a strong and compassionate Canada.

This report provides information on how IRCC will support the Government on achieving our agenda in the coming year, and I am fully confident that the Department is prepared to successfully support me and work with our partners inside and outside government to deliver for Canadians. However, given our commitment to more effective reporting, this year’s report will be the final submission using the existing reporting framework.

The Prime Minister and the President of the Treasury Board are working to develop new, simplified and more effective reporting processes that will better allow Parliament and Canadians to monitor our Government’s progress on delivering real change to Canadians. In the future, IRCC’s reports to Parliament will focus more transparently on how we are using our resources to fulfill our commitments and achieve results for Canadians.

These new reporting mechanisms will allow Canadians to more easily follow our Department’s progress towards delivering on our priorities which were outlined in the Prime Minister’s mandate letter to me.

The plans and priorities of IRCC reflect our understanding that generations of newcomers helped develop Canada into the great nation we cherish today. Canadians’ welcoming attitude and strong commitment to diversity have set us apart as a people who value the contribution of every individual and community in our country. Welcoming people here in order to give them an opportunity to succeed is the very history of Canada. It’s what we’ve always done, and it has contributed enormously to our country.

In 2016, following up on our national project to resettle thousands of Syrian refugees in Canada, we will continue to work with other levels of government and partners across the country in order to help Syrian and other refugees successfully integrate into Canadian society. We will also fully restore the Interim Federal Health Program benefits, to provide temporary health-care coverage to refugees and asylum claimants.

The Government of Canada will make family reunification an important priority because when families are able to stay together, their integration to Canada and ability to work and grow their communities all improve. We will work to restore the maximum age for dependants to 22 from 19 and re-examine the two-year conditional permanent residence provision for sponsored spouses. A key element of our commitment to reuniting families is reducing inventories and processing times. This is a challenge that will be every bit as demanding as our effort to resettle 25,000 Syrian refugees. I am confident that the lessons learned during our national project will help us meet this goal.

In the area of Canadian citizenship, we will repeal elements of the Citizenship Act that are unfair for certain Canadian citizens and permanent residents, ensuring that there will only be one tier of citizenship in this country. We will also continue to work to reduce the processing times of citizenship applications, while protecting the integrity of the Citizenship Program.

Within our economic immigration streams, we will examine the performance of the Express Entry application management system—introduced in January 2015—with an eye to making enhancements as necessary.

Protecting the health and safety of Canadians will remain one of our key priorities in the coming year. To that end, we will monitor our use, and work toward the expansion, of biometric collection, screening and verification, as well as continue the implementation of the Electronic Travel Authorization. We will continue to enhance the security and integrity of the Passport Program and we will review the visa requirements for certain countries.

As Canada’s Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, I am confident that the plans and priorities described in this report will support the Government of Canada’s commitment to building a strong immigration system that is grounded in compassion and economic opportunity for all, while continuing to protect the health and security of all Canadians.

I know that the successful realization of these commitments will depend on the talent, dedication and expertise of the public servants who work at IRCC. I would like to thank these individuals for their expert guidance and support, and for all of the hard work that they do for Canadians and for those who aspire to become Canadians.

The Honourable John McCallum, PC, MP
Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Minister: John McCallum

Deputy Head: Anita Biguzs

Ministerial portfolio:

Enabling Instruments: Section 95 of the Constitution Act, 1867, the Citizenship Act, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), the Canadian Multiculturalism ActFootnote 2 and the Canadian Passport Order.

Year established: 1994

Organizational Context

Raison d'être

In the first years after Confederation, Canada’s leaders had a powerful vision: to connect Canada by rail and make the West the world’s breadbasket as a foundation for the country’s economic prosperity. This vision meant quickly populating the Prairies, leading the Government of Canada to establish its first national immigration policies. Today, Canada’s immigration system balances compassion with economic opportunity. Immigrants come to Canada as skilled workers fuelling industrial growth, as entrepreneurs and as innovators helping Canada to compete in the global, knowledge-based economy, as family members (spouses, children, parents and grandparents) to be reunited with their families, and as refugees seeking protection in a welcoming country.

Responsibilities

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) selects as permanent and temporary residents foreign nationals whose skills contribute to Canadian prosperity, and their families.

The Department maintains Canada’s humanitarian tradition by welcoming refugees and other people in need of protection, thereby upholding its international obligations and reputation.

IRCC develops Canada’s admissibility policy, which sets the conditions for entering and remaining in Canada. It conducts, in collaboration with its partners, the screening of potential permanent and temporary residents to protect the health, safety and security of Canadians. IRCC is also responsible for the issuance and control of Canadian passports and other documents that facilitate the travel of Canadian citizens and residents.

Lastly, the Department builds a stronger Canada by helping all newcomers settle and integrate into Canadian society and the economy, and by encouraging, granting and providing proof of Canadian citizenship.

To achieve its goals, IRCC offers many of its services on the IRCC Web site, as well as at 25 in-Canada points of service and 61 points of service in 52 countries. IRCC also partners with other federal government departments to administer its many programs. For instance, IRCC works with Service Canada and Canada Post for the delivery of most passport services through these departments’ respective 153 and 43 in-Canada locations. IRCC also partners with Global Affairs Canada, which provides passport services abroad. Additionally, IRCC’s services and programs are delivered through contract or grant and contribution agreements. As of December 2015 there were 136 visa application centres in 96 countries, 138 application support centres within the United States of America, and a panel physicians network operating around the world.

Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture

  • Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada's economy
    • Program 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents
      • Sub-Program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers
      • Sub-Program 1.1.2: Federal Skilled Trades
      • Sub-Program 1.1.3: Quebec Skilled Workers
      • Sub-Program 1.1.4: Provincial Nominees
      • Sub-Program 1.1.5: Caregiver
      • Sub-Program 1.1.6: Canadian Experience Class
      • Sub-Program 1.1.7: Federal Business Immigrants
      • Sub-Program 1.1.8: Quebec Business Immigrants
    • Program 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents
      • Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Students
      • Sub-Program 1.2.2: Temporary Work Authorization
      • Sub-Program 1.2.3: International Experience Canada
  • Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
    • Program 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration
      • Sub-Program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification
      • Sub-Program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification
      • Sub-Program 2.1.3: Humanitarian & Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations
    • Program 2.2: Refugee Protection
      • Sub-Program 2.2.1: Government-Assisted Refugees
      • Sub-Program 2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees
      • Sub-Program 2.2.3: Blended Visa Office Referred Refugees
      • Sub-Program 2.2.4: In-Canada Asylum
      • Sub-Program 2.2.5: Pre-removal Risk Assessment
  • Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society
    • Program 3.1: Newcomer Settlement and Integration
      • Sub-Program 3.1.1: Settlement
        • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.1: Language Training
        • Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.2: Community and Labour Market Integration Services
      • Sub-Program 3.1.2: Grant to Quebec
      • Sub-Program 3.1.3: Immigration Loan
      • Sub-Program 3.1.4: Resettlement Assistance Program
    • Program 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians
      • Sub-Program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness
      • Sub-Program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation
    • Program 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians Footnote *
      • Sub-Program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness
      • Sub-Program 3.3.2: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support
  • Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians
    • Program 4.1: Health Protection
      • Sub-Program 4.1.1: Health Screening
      • Sub-Program 4.1.2: Medical Surveillance and Notification
      • Sub-Program 4.1.3: Interim Federal Health
    • Program 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management
      • Sub-Program 4.2.1: Identity Management
      • Sub-Program 4.2.2: Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents
      • Sub-Program 4.2.3: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants
    • Program 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda
    • Program 4.4: Passport
  • Program 5.1: Internal Services (Supports all SOs)

Organizational Priorities

Refugee Resettlement (New Priority)

Resettling refugees is about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted while enabling them to bring their experiences, hopes, dreams and skills to Canada to help build an even richer and more prosperous society for all.

In the foreseeable future, forced migration or involuntary displacement, which have been on the rise over the years, are not projected to slow down. For example, according to the United Nations Refugee Agency, in 2014 approximately 59.5 million people were forcibly displaced due to conflict and persecution (the largest number since the end of World War II), and approximately half of the world’s refugees are children.

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
IRCC is committed to continuing to provide protection through its refugee resettlement programs and will continue to respond effectively to acute refugee and humanitarian crisis situations. The Department will also continue focusing on multi-year commitments to specific populations to provide for better integration outcomes. Moreover, the Department will work with other federal departments, foreign governments and international organizations to implement a coordinated approach to resettlement where possible. Ongoing Ongoing SO 2: P 2.2, SP 2.2.1, SP 2.2.2 and SP 2.2.3
IRCC will continue to devote qualified resources in order to support the Government’s initiative to resettle 25,000 Syrian refugees. The Department will also collaborate with partners to provide essential services and long-term support for the refugees’ successful resettlement and integration into Canada, both economically and socially. This will include full coverage under the Interim Federal Health Program. Ongoing Ongoing SO 3: SP 3.1.1, SP 3.1.3 and SP 3.1.4
SO 4: SP 4.1.3
IRCC recognizes that refugees have unique integration needs and are facing different integration challenges. As such, the Department will work toward responding to the specific short- and long-term needs of specific refugee populations to enable their integration into Canadian society. More information on the Resettlement Assistance Program is available on IRCC’s Web site. Ongoing Ongoing SO 3: SP 3.1.1, SP 3.1.3 and SP 3.1.4
Fostering Family Reunification (New Priority)

When newcomers and their families stay together, it fosters their social and economic integration into Canada, thereby contributing to Canada’s social and economic prosperity.

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
IRCC will explore options to waive the two-year conditional permanent resident status for new spouses entering Canada. November 2015 March 2017 SO 2: SP 2.1.1

The maximum age for dependants will be revised to allow more Canadians and permanent residents to bring their children to Canada.

November 2015 March 2017 SO 2: SP 2.1.1
The cap for sponsorship applications for parents and grandparents will be doubled from 5,000 to 10,000 in order to reunite more families. November 2015 March 2017 SO 2: SP 2.1.2
The Department will also develop a plan to reduce application processing times for family sponsorship. November 2015 March 2017 SO 2: SP 2.1.1
IRCC will explore options to use the Express Entry system to provide more opportunities for applicants who have Canadian siblings. November 2015 March 2017 SO 1: P 1.1, SP 1.1.1, SP 1.1.2, SP 1.1.4 and SP 1.1.6
Enhancing Service Excellence (Ongoing Priority)

Continuous innovation in service excellence allows IRCC to improve services in all of its business lines while adding value for money for Canadians. An enhanced client service experience, among many other factors, improves Canada’s international competiveness in attracting the best and brightest to Canada. The Department will strive to provide easy, efficient and timely services to those wishing to come to Canada for the purposes of immigration, work, study or travel, and for those applying for Canadian travel documents such as passports.

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
The Department will progressively move toward delivering more online and accessible services through a number of electronic platforms (smart phones, tablets and computers). With these tools, clients will be given straightforward, plain language instructions on the requirements for the services they are seeking. April 2011 Ongoing All SOs and sub-programs
IRCC will take steps to develop new protocols to enable more case information to be shared with clients as their files are being processed and to proactively communicate in plain language. June 2015 Ongoing All SOs and sub-programs

To the greatest extent possible, file processing will be simplified and automated, and the management of working inventories will be optimized through online rather than paper-based processing. The Department will move to implement an integrated network that will facilitate distributing the workload across the Department’s global work force, which will enable files received to be processed, regardless of whether they were submitted in Canada or abroad, based on where capacity is available in the Department. This will contribute to improved processing times for clients and support the Department in meeting its service standards for even more applications.

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Minister’s mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada’s website.

April 2011 Ongoing All SOs and sub-programs

Risk Analysis

Corporate risks and mitigation strategies identified by senior management are used to set IRCC’s strategic directions and inform the development of the Integrated Corporate Plan. Risks and mitigation strategies are reviewed regularly to ensure they remain current.

Key Risks
Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Failure to fully deliver on core objectives due to extensive change agenda

There is a risk that IRCC may not be able to meet operational objectives (for example, levels, service standards and processing targets) while implementing key pieces of its extensive change agenda.

In order to build and leverage efficiencies in the IRCC network, advance modernization efforts across IRCC.

To better position IRCC to meet its operational objectives, continue to effectively manage the inventory of permanent resident applications and reduce overall processing times by managing intake for certain categories and managing the flow of applications to capitalize on where network capacity is available.

IRCC will also redeploy resources to fill gaps in high priority areas where necessary, for example, to address the humanitarian crisis in Syria.

  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services

Theft, loss or inadvertent release of sensitive information or data

There is a risk that IRCC’s critical, sensitive or private information could be stolen or inadvertently compromised, lost or improperly shared, which could have a significant impact on IRCC’s service delivery, clients and reputation.

Implement a privacy framework to enhance governance and review the process for managing privacy breaches.

To help prevent privacy and data breaches, renew information-management learning and awareness activities and increase security sweeps of IRCC offices.

Continue to develop and update information-sharing arrangements with federal, provincial and territorial partners that include security of information.

  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services

Compromise of program integrity due to increasingly sophisticated fraudulent activities

There is a risk that IRCC will not be adequately equipped to detect or prevent increased attempts to defraud external programs and services, which could undermine the integrity of IRCC’s programs and lead to a loss of public confidence.

Implement modernized tools and use predictive and data analytics and business-intelligence reporting for integrated program delivery.

Continue to expand and monitor the use of biometrics to verify the identity of all visa- and permit-required temporary and permanent resident travellers seeking entry to Canada.

Continue to enhance the security and integrity of the Passport Program as well as improve its service delivery and accessibility through modernization efforts.

Implement IRCC’s new Fraud Management Policy Framework to strengthen the prevention, detection, assessment and reporting of fraud and corruption, both internal and external to the Department.

  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4

Reliance on partners to support delivery of programs and services

Given that IRCC is dependent on complex partnerships to support policy and program development, as well as to deliver its internal and external services, there is a risk that partners may not engage or deliver services in an efficient and timely manner, which could impact achievement of IRCC’s strategic outcomes and operational objectives.

Work with provinces and territories to improve outcomes and advance work on the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Vision Action Plan.

Build and maintain strong relationships with partners abroad and within Canada in order to advance immigration, humanitarian and information-sharing interests.

Engage in a coordinated manner with federal departments linked to IRCC priorities and mandate achievement.

Continue close engagement with provinces, territories, municipalities, private and non-profit organizations, and private sponsors in order to welcome resettled refugees.

  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 3
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services

Cumulative natural disasters and unexpected events could impact the delivery of operations

There is a risk that severe or cumulative natural disasters or emerging world events could affect IRCC’s operations or infrastructure in ways that could overburden or shut down program delivery or endanger employees and Canadians.

Continue to enhance emergency preparedness through planning and partnerships.

Continue to devote qualified resources and work collaboratively with partners to provide essential services and long-term support for the successful resettlement of Syrian refugees and their integration into Canada, both economically and socially.

Use lessons learned from the current effort to resettle Syrian refugees to inform responses to future events.

Provide health screening and coverage as needed to respond to emerging humanitarian crises and emergencies.

Undertake scanning and strategic foresight work to identify possible future challenges.

  • SO 1
  • SO 2
  • SO 4
  • Internal Services
Failure to fully deliver on core objectives due to extensive change agenda

IRCC’s policy agenda continues to evolve with Government priorities. As such, IRCC will continue to develop innovative and strategic policies to facilitate entry into Canada, the acquisition of Canadian citizenship and travel abroad for Canadians, and to balance the risks inherent to this work. Additionally, IRCC will continue to streamline and integrate its existing program delivery model to maximize processing effectiveness across the network to create efficiencies, manage workloads and improve the client experience. To facilitate more effective use of its resources and provide better service to clients, IRCC will continue to work effectively to manage inventories and reduce processing times.

Theft, loss or inadvertent release of sensitive information/data

IRCC collects and holds a significant amount of personal information. Recent years have seen an increase in the incidence, sophistication and magnitude of cyber attacks on Government of Canada systems, and threats can come from both internal and external sources. There is a risk that IRCC’s critical, sensitive or private information could be stolen or inadvertently compromised, lost or improperly shared, which could have a significant impact on IRCC’s service delivery, clients and reputation. In 2016–2017, IRCC will continue to strengthen its privacy governance and modernize delivery of training to staff on privacy risks, information management and best practices. In addition, IRCC will continue to implement stronger and better tools and processes for collecting, managing and storing information, and for sharing it both internally and externally.

Compromise of program integrity due to increasingly sophisticated fraudulent activities

Fraud prevention is an ongoing challenge in immigration, citizenship and passport programs. As program integrity is strengthened, individuals will develop more sophisticated means of gaining illegal entry to Canada. IRCC will continue to strengthen program integrity through stronger governance, the expanded use of biometrics, improved information sharing, modernized tools and use of predictive and data analytics and business-intelligence reporting.

Reliance on partners to support delivery of programs and services

IRCC relies on partners and stakeholders to support policy and program development, as well as to deliver its internal and external services. As a result, IRCC’s ability to deliver services is dependent upon these partners fulfilling their commitments. In addition, decisions made by IRCC or any of its partners or stakeholders can significantly affect relationships, performance results and the ability of all stakeholders to meet objectives. In 2016–2017, IRCC will continue to work with the U.S. government to reinforce the Canada-U.S. border, will strengthen relationships with provinces and territories, and will work closely with other federal departments and agencies, third-party service provider organizations and other public stakeholders to deliver all programs efficiently and effectively, including through the continued use of joint governance structures, service standards and reporting requirements.

Cumulative natural disasters and/or unexpected events could impact IRCC’s ability to deliver its operations

Terrorism, political unrest, natural disasters or war can lead to unpredictable migration flows, threaten the health and safety of Canadians, or overburden or shut down IRCC’s operational infrastructure. Any of these situations may also require Canada’s intervention and specialized supports for resettlement or for emergency or temporary passports for Canadians to facilitate their repatriation. For instance, in response to the Syrian refugee crisis, IRCC will continue to redeploy and devote qualified resources and employ its close engagement with provinces, territories, municipalities, private and non-profit organizations and private sponsors to effectively respond to the situation, working toward the successful resettlement of refugees and their integration into Canadian society.

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
1,650,832,227 1,650,832,227 1,487,136,351 1,900,461,381
Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents—FTEs)
2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
5,941 5,693 5,807

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcomes and Programs (dollars)

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2013–14 Expenditures 2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Forecast Spending 2016–17 Main Estimates 2016–17 Planned Spending 2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending
1.1 Permanent Economic Residents 79,311,818 81,907,913 103,191,774 44,243,952 44,243,952 43,651,345 43,343,392
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents 20,831,035 28,817,691 25,545,363 53,069,957 53,069,957 25,945,027 25,592,541
Strategic Outcome 1 Subtotal 100,142,853 110,725,604 128,737,137 97,313,909 97,313,909 69,596,372 68,935,933
Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2013–14 Expenditures 2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Forecast Spending 2016–17 Main Estimates 2016–17 Planned Spending 2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending
2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration 44,096,198 39,557,058 39,049,615 36,932,907 36,932,907 36,579,855 36,388,427
2.2 Refugee Protection 28,698,237 29,926,000 181,642,142 28,013,358 28,013,358 21,997,034 21,942,007
Strategic Outcome 2 Subtotal 72,794,435 69,483,058 220,691,757 64,946,265 64,946,265 58,576,889 58,330,434
Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2013–14 Expenditures 2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Forecast Spending 2016–17 Main Estimates 2016–17 Planned Spending 2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending
3.1 Newcomer Settlement and Integration 970,807,076 1,010,190,212 1,116,866,241 1,174,026,452 1,174,026,452 1,065,220,715 1,062,214,554
3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 62,517,787 82,983,275 71,474,571 62,018,218 62,018,218 60,846,915 60,875,272

3.3 Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All CanadiansFootnote 3

9,793,615 6,771,604 13,148,674 12,100,261 12,100,261 12,204,636 12,207,624
Strategic Outcome 3 Subtotal 1,043,118,478 1,099,945,091 1,201,489,486 1,248,144,931 1,248,144,931 1,138,272,266 1,135,297,450
Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians
Strategic Outcomes, Programs and Internal Services 2013–14 Expenditures 2014–15 Expenditures 2015–16 Forecast Spending 2016–17 Main Estimates 2016–17 Planned Spending 2017–18 Planned Spending 2018–19 Planned Spending
4.1 Health Protection 38,115,873 31,042,845 82,662,123 75,135,278 75,135,278 60,593,922 60,583,383
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management 93,642,100 104,056,335 123,391,481 154,340,892 154,340,892 148,165,559 184,014,280
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda 5,616,646 5,896,698 5,310,786 5,908,956 5,908,956 5,882,403 5,882,475
4.4 PassportFootnote 4 (206,332,014) (287,387,229) (202,153,477) (184,207,868) (184,207,868) (171,474,181) 213,697,207
Strategic Outcome 4 Subtotal (68,957,395) (146,391,351) 9,210,913 51,177,258 51,177,258 43,167,703 464,177,345
Internal Services Subtotal 231,596,325 226,988,706 200,767,873 189,249,864 189,249,864 177,523,121 173,720,219
Total 1,378,694,696 1,360,751,108 1,760,897,166 1,650,832,227 1,650,832,227 1,487,136,351 1,900,461,381

In the tables above, planned spending reflects funds already included in the departmental reference levels as well as funds authorized up to December 31, 2015. Forecast Spending for 2015–2016 includes 2015–2016 Main Estimates, Supplementary Estimates approved in December 2015 and other minor approved adjustments. Expenditures represent the total authorities used for the fiscal year, as reported in the Public Accounts of Canada.

The increase of actual spending from $1.361 billion in 2014–2015 to the 2015–2016 forecast of $1.761 billion is mainly related to significant approved funding in 2015–2016 to respond to the Syrian refugee crisis by bringing refugees to Canada and starting resettlement activities. The increase is offset somewhat by a projected decrease in a forecasted surplus for the Passport Program as a result of important modernization investments.

From the 2015–2016 forecast of $1.761 billion, planned spending is reduced in 2016–2017 to $1.651 billion. This net decrease is mainly attributable to a decrease in the approved funding profile for the Syrian refugee crisis, the non-inclusion of potential carry-forward funding and the winding down of fee returns for the cancelled Federal Skilled Worker and Immigrant Investor Program applications. These decreases were partially offset by funding provided to improve the Temporary Work Authorization Program and by investments in the expansion of biometric screening.

From planned spending of $1.651 billion for 2016–2017, a decrease to $1.487 billion is forecasted in 2017–2018. The reduction in funding is mainly related to a winding down of the Syria file as this initiative enters its third year and funding stabilizes for 2017–2018 and 2018–2019. This funding will mainly be for transfer payments related to Settlement and Resettlement Assistance Programs. Another reduction relates to the end of targeted two-year funding for enhancements to the Temporary Work Authorization Program.

Finally, the increase of $413 million in planned spending from 2017–2018 to 2018–2019 is mainly related to two items. First, for the Passport Program, as foreseen since the implementation of new passport fees in July 2013, it is anticipated that the program will begin to incur an annual deficit as the impact of the 10-year passport will start to be realized, given an anticipated significant decrease in volumes for 2018–2019. As planned, this deficit will be absorbed by the cumulated revolving fund surplus from previous years. The second item is related to an approved increase in funding for the biometric screening expansion required to pay for the service transaction charged by the visa application centres to process applications.

The following identifies, by program, the most significant fluctuations over the period of this report:

Permanent Economic Residents: The significant drop from 2015–2016 to 2016–2017 and beyond is mostly explained by the winding down of fee returns for terminated applications for the Federal Skilled Worker and Immigrant Investor Programs.

Temporary Economic Residents: The increase in 2016–2017 and then the subsequent drop in future years are mostly related to targeted funding received to improve the Temporary Work Authorization Program in 2016–2017.

Refugee Protection: The increase in 2015–2016 is related to the Government’s response to the Syrian refugee crisis. Funding is to be used to identify, select, transport and resettle Syrian refugees across Canada.

Newcomer Settlement and Integration: The increases in 2015–2016 and 2016–2017 are mostly related to the Syria file. Funding is to support organizations that will help Syrian refugees resettle in Canada.

Health Protection Program: The increases in 2015–2016 and 2016–2017 reflect the full budget for the Interim Federal Health Program as well as funding received to provide medical assistance to Syrian refugees.

Migration Control and Security Management: The increase in planned spending over time is mainly due to the expansion of biometric screening.

Passport Program: The Program is forecast to break even over its 10-year business cycle. In the early years, the Passport Program Revolving Fund will accumulate a surplus, with the annual surplus declining each year until 2018–2019, when it is anticipated that an annual deficit will be incurred until the end of the 10-year business cycle, at which point the cumulated surplus should be exhausted. The annual deficit will begin to occur in 2018–2019, when it is anticipated that many passport holders will possess a 10-year passport as opposed to a five-year passport; consequently, they will not need to renew their passport for a longer period of time and annual revenues will begin to drop.

Alignment of Program Spending with the Whole-of-government Framework

Alignment of 2016–2017 Planned Program Spending with the Whole-of-government Framework (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2016–17 Planned Spending
Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada’s economy 1.1 Permanent Economic Residents Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 44,243,952
1.2 Temporary Economic Residents Economic Affairs Strong Economic Growth 53,069,957
Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted 2.1 Family and Discretionary Immigration Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 36,932,907
2.2 Refugee Protection International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 28,013,358
Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society 3.1 Newcomer Settlement and Integration Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 1,174,026,452
3.2 Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 62,018,218
3.3 Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All CanadiansFootnote 5 Social Affairs A diverse society that promotes linguistic duality and social inclusion 12,100,261
Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians 4.1 Health Protection Social Affairs Healthy Canadians 75,135,278
4.2 Migration Control and Security Management Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 154,340,892
4.3 Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement 5,908,956
4.4 Passport International Affairs A safe and secure world through international engagement (184,207,868)
Total Planned Program Spending by Whole-of-government Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs 97,313,909
Social Affairs 1,514,554,008
International Affairs (150,285,554)Footnote 6
Government AffairsFootnote 7

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend - image is described below
Text version: Departmental Spending Trend 2013-2014 to 2018-2019

This graph shows the Department's spending trend for grants and contributions, operating and statutory expenditures from 2012–2013 to 2017–2018. The data represents actual spending (2012–2013 to 2013–2014), forecast spending (2014–2015) and planned spending (2015–2016 to 2017–2018). The data is broken down between statutory and voted expenditures as shown below:

 
  2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory (100,000) (191,000) (90,000) (119,000) (110,000) 275,000
Voted 1,479,000 1,552,000 1,851,000 1,770,000 1,597,000 1,625,000
Total 1,379,000 1,361,000 1,761,000 1,651,000 1,487,000 1,900,000

From 2014–2015 to 2018–2019, the Department will experience significant yearly financial fluctuations. These fluctuations are mainly related to the funding profile for the response to the Syrian refugee crisis, combined with other items such as the financial impact of the planned decrease in passport volumes in 2018–2019 and the expansion of the in-Canada biometric screening process. These items will impact both Statutory and Voted funding. The trends for each category are explained as follows:

Statutory

Under Statutory authorities, the net changes are most significantly influenced by the Passport Program, employee benefit plans and fee returns for terminated applications for the Federal Skilled Workers and Immigrant Investor Programs. With the exception of 2018–2019, statutory spending shows a net negative amount. This is mainly due to the Passport Program, which is expected to generate cumulative annual surpluses until 2017–2018, offsetting other statutory expenditures (surpluses for a revolving fund are shown as negative expenditures against the fiscal framework; that is, revolving fund surpluses reduce draws on government resources). In 2018–2019, for the first time since the inception of new passport fees in July 2013, it is anticipated that, overall, an annual deficit will be incurred by the Passport Program until the end of the 10-year business cycle, at which point the cumulated Passport Program surplus should be exhausted. The annual Passport Program deficit will begin to occur in 2018–2019 when it is anticipated that many passport holders will possess a 10-year passport as opposed to a five-year passport; consequently, they will not need to renew their passport for a longer period of time and annual revenues will begin to drop.

Voted

The voted items are comprised of operating expenditures, transfer payments and, starting in 2016–2017, capital expenditures.

Between 2013–2014 and 2014–2015, the Department has experienced increased spending in voted items. These increases were mostly related to the Beyond the Border initiative, implementation of core initiatives such as citizenship reforms and obligations with partners through transfer payments. Starting in 2015–2016, the initiatives that will have the most significant funding impacts are: the Government’s response to the Syrian refugee crisis—a four-year initiative for which 85% of the funds are projected to be spent in 2015–2016 and 2016–2017 to bring in refugees and help them resettle in Canada—and the biometric screening expansion, for which investments will keep increasing until steady state in 2019–2020.

Estimates by Vote

For information on IRCC’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2016–2017 Main Estimates on the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat Web site.

Canada’s Immigration Plan for 2016

The immigration levels set out in Canada’s immigration plan for 2016 reflect the Government of Canada’s priorities related to the accelerated resettlement of Syrian refugees and reunification of Canadians with their families, while also meeting economic objectives. The levels plan is informed by consultations with the provinces and territories, performance results, Government of Canada and departmental priorities, and operational capacities. Further details can be found in the Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration 2015 to be tabled in Parliament by March 2016.

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome 1: Migration of permanent and temporary residents that strengthens Canada's economy

IRCC plays a significant role in fostering Canada’s economic development. By promoting Canada as a destination of choice for innovation, investment and opportunity, IRCC encourages talented individuals to come to Canada and to contribute to our prosperity. Canada’s immigration program is based on non-discriminatory principles—foreign nationals are assessed without regard to race, nationality, ethnic origin, colour, religion or gender. Those who are selected to immigrate to Canada have the skills, education, language competencies and work experience to make an immediate economic contribution.

IRCC’s efforts, whether through policy and program development or processing applications for various programs, result in several hundred thousand new permanent residents each year. With the launch of Express Entry in January 2015, IRCC only accepts applications to specific programs from people IRCC has invited to immigrate to Canada. This is intended to prevent the growth of backlogs by ensuring that only the candidates who are most likely to succeed are able to apply to immigrate to Canada. Express Entry gives employers more recruitment options and help them better respond to labour shortages where there are no available Canadian citizens or permanent residents, and offers faster, more efficient processing and a better ability to respond to Canada’s labour market.

Through policy and program development and processing applications, IRCC’s temporary resident programs help meet Canada’s temporary labour market needs, facilitate global talent mobility and youth exchanges, attract and retain international students, and help enable trade, investment and tourism.

Benefits for Canadians

Immigration continues to have a significant influence on Canadian society and economic development. Permanent residents who arrive in Canada every year enhance Canada’s social fabric, contribute to labour market growth and strengthen the economy. Changes that modernize and improve the immigration system not only strengthen the integrity of the Permanent Economic Residents Program but also benefit Canada by targeting skills Canadian employers need and admitting qualified individuals more quickly.

Temporary foreign workers help generate growth for a number of Canadian industries by meeting short-term and acute needs in the labour market that are not easily filled by the domestic labour force. In addition, foreign workers are facilitated on the basis of Canada’s economic and cultural interests. International students contribute economically as consumers and enrich the fabric of Canadian society through their diverse experiences and talents. Some temporary workers and international students represent a key talent pool to be retained as immigrants.

Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved

Rank within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development of employment rate for all immigrants

≤ 5 End of each calendar year

The following programs and sub-programs support this Strategic Outcome:

Program 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA), the focus of this program is on the selection and processing of immigrants who can support the development of a strong and prosperous Canada, in which the benefits of immigration are shared across all regions of Canada. The acceptance of qualified permanent residents helps the Government meet its economic objectives, such as building a skilled work force, addressing immediate and longer-term labour market needs, and supporting national and regional labour force growth. The selection and processing of applications involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers

The goal of the Federal Skilled Workers (FSW) Program is to select highly-skilled immigrants whose high human capital enables them to contribute to Canada's long-term national and structural labour market needs, in support of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy. The program uses a points system to identify prospective immigrants with the ability to establish economically in Canada, based on their human capital (education, skilled work experience, language skills, etc.), with a minimum language threshold and a third-party foreign educational credential assessment prior to application. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Federal Skilled Trades

The Federal Skilled Trades (FST) Program is intended to attract skilled tradespersons who can meet labour demands in specific trades across the country and who are granted permanent residence based on being qualified in a skilled trade. In contrast with the FSW Program’s points-based selection, the FST Program operates on a streamlined pass/fail basis with four mandatory criteria including: a minimum language threshold; a valid offer of employment in Canada or a certificate of qualification from a province or territory in a qualifying skilled trade; at least two years of work experience in the occupation within the last five years; and meeting the employment requirements set out in the National Occupational Classification system. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Quebec Skilled Workers

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and to issue permanent resident visas. The Quebec Skilled Workers (QSW) Program uses specific criteria to identify immigrants with the human capital and skills needed to establish economically in Quebec. Similar to the FSW Program, the QSW Program assesses applicants according to their age, education, work experience, language proficiency (in French) and enhanced settlement prospects (previous education or work experience in Canada, or a confirmed job offer). The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.1.4: Provincial Nominees

The Provincial Nominee (PN) Program supports the Government of Canada’s objective that the benefits of immigration be shared across all regions of Canada. Bilateral immigration agreements are in place with all provinces and territories except Nunavut and QuebecFootnote 8, conferring on their governments the authority to identify and nominate for permanent residence immigrants who will meet local economic development and regional labour market needs, and who wish to settle in that specific province or territory. As part of the nomination process, provincial and territorial governments assess the skills, education and work or business experience of prospective candidates to ensure that nominees can make an immediate economic contribution to the nominating province or territory. IRCC retains the final authority to select nominees who can establish economically in Canada, and verifies that nominees meet all admissibility requirements before issuing permanent resident visas. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.1.5: Caregiver

The Caregiver Program allows persons residing in Canada to employ qualified foreign workers to provide care for children, elderly persons or persons with a chronic medical condition or disability. In 2014, two new pathways to permanent residence for caregivers were introduced under Ministerial Instructions pilots that benefit from a processing standard of six months. One pathway features criteria for child care providers that are similar to the requirements of the Live-in Caregiver Program, but without the need for the caregiver to live in the home of their employer where they may be vulnerable to abuse. In addition, caregivers in a variety of health care occupations will also have a pathway to permanent residence; eligible caregivers in this stream are able to gain their work experience either in providing in-home care or care in a health-care facility to an elderly person or a person with a disability or chronic medical condition. With the improvements to the Caregiver Program, caregivers who had applied for the Live-in Caregiver Program with an initial work permit based on an employer’s approved Labour Market Impact Assessment submitted on or before November 30, 2014, will also be able to complete the work requirement on a live-in basis and eventually apply for permanent residence. The selection and processing in both the Caregiver and the Live-in Caregiver programs involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.1.6: Canadian Experience Class

The Canadian Experience Class (CEC) Program was introduced in 2008 as a path to permanent residence for those with eligible work experience in Canada, usually obtained as a result of temporary residence as a foreign worker or international student. The program is complementary to the FSW Program but uses different criteria, including eligible skilled Canadian work experience and a minimum level of proficiency in English or French. The program provides a streamlined route to permanent residence for those who have already established themselves in skilled work in Canada. This allows Canada to retain talented workers who have demonstrated a capacity to integrate successfully and contribute to the Canadian economy. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.1.7: Federal Business Immigrants

Federal Business Immigrants admitted to Canada are intended to have the experience and skills to support, through their investment, entrepreneurial ideas and business skills, or self-employment, the development of a strong and prosperous economy. The program was designed so that immigrant investors bring business capital to Canada, while entrepreneurs contribute to economic development through business ideas and skills that promote enterprise and employment creation. Self-employed persons hold the intention and ability to be self-employed in Canada in such fields as athletics, cultural activities and farming, thereby making a contribution to specified activities in our economy. The Start-Up Visa Program is a five year pilot program that was launched in April 2013 and is designed to attract innovative foreign entrepreneurs with the skills to create new companies that can compete on a global scale. The Immigrant Investor Venture Capital Program is a pilot program designed to target high net-worth business immigrants who will each invest $2 million to fill key financing gaps in the economy in support of promising Canadian entrepreneurs, with selection criteria designed to attract investors with the skills and abilities that will help their integration into the Canadian economy and society. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.1.8: Quebec Business Immigrants

The Canada-Quebec Accord specifies that the province of Quebec is solely responsible for the selection of applicants destined to the province of Quebec. Federal responsibility under the Accord is to assess an applicant’s admissibility and issue permanent resident visas. This program seeks to attract experienced investors, entrepreneurs and self-employed persons to the province of Quebec, to support the development of a strong and prosperous economy in Quebec. The selection and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 1.1
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   453 446 446
Spending 44,243,952 44,243,952 43,651,345 43,343,392
Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Resource 2016−17
Planned Spending
2017−18
Planned Spending
2018−19
Planned Spending
1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers FTEs 209 206 205
Spending 21,852,806 21,521,421 21,316,848
1.1.2: Federal Skilled Trades FTEs 4 4 4
Spending 439,746 438,071 465,062
1.1.3: Quebec Skilled Workers FTEs 45 44 45
Spending 4,160,998 4,092,506 4,076,606
1.1.4: Provincial Nominee FTEs 57 56 57
Spending 5,632,724 5,563,467 5,581,779
1.1.5: Caregiver FTEs 94 93 93
Spending 7,262,422 7,196,209 7,145,737
1.1.6: Canadian Experience Class FTEs 31 30 29
Spending 2,987,415 2,953,382 2,889,217
1.1.7: Federal Business Immigrants FTEs 10 10 10
Spending 1,518,738 1,503,030 1,489,649
1.1.8: Quebec Business Immigrants FTEs 3 3 3
Spending 389,103 383,259 378,494

Performance Measurement – Program 1.1 and Sub-Programs

Program 1.1: Permanent Economic Residents
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The benefits of economic immigration are shared across all regions of Canada Percentage of economic permanent resident principal applicants who settle and who are retained outside of the Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver census metropolitan areas (CMAs) three years after landing > 40% End of each calendar year
Economic immigrants support the labour market needs of Canada Average employment earnings of economic principal applicants relative as a percentage of the Canadian average, five years after landing 100% Calendar year 2020
Immigration contributes to Canada’s economic growth The percentage of economic permanent resident admissions relative to overall permanent resident admissionsFootnote 9 TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Canada’s labour market needs are strengthened by temporary residents’ transitions to permanent residence Number of temporary resident principal applicants who transition to permanent residence in economic immigration categories TBC based on operational capacity End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 1.1.1: Federal Skilled Workers
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federal skilled workers (FSWs) adapt to the needs of the Canadian labour market FSW principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing + 15% Calendar year 2020
Percentage of FSW principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing ≥ 35% Calendar year 2020
Rate of social assistance for FSW principal applicants, five years after landing ≤ 5% Calendar year 2020
Sub-Program 1.1.2: Federal Skilled Trades
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federal skilled tradespersons (FSTs) with skills that support the labour market needs of Canada FST principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing is available Calendar year 2020
Percentage of FST principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing is available Calendar year 2020
Rate of social assistance for FST principal applicants, five years after landing TBD in 2020—once data for sufficient years since landing is available Calendar year 2020
Sub-Program 1.1.3: Quebec Skilled Workers
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Successful Quebec skilled worker (QSW) applicants and family members are admitted to Quebec Number of admissions of QSWs destined to Quebec TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Program 1.1.4: Provincial Nominee
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Provincial nominees (PNs) support regional labour market needs Percentage of PN principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing ≥ 25% End of each calendar year
PNs support the labour market needs of the province or territory of nomination PN principal applicants’ incidence of employment, in their province or territory of nomination, relative to that province or territory’s incidence of employment, five years after landing ≥ + 10% Calendar year 2020
PNs contribute to the shared benefits of immigration in regions of Canada Percentage of PNs who settle that are retained outside of Toronto and Vancouver CMAs (excludes Quebec and QSWs) ≥ 90% End of each calendar year
Program 1.1.5: Caregiver
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Eligible caregivers transition from temporary resident status and are admitted to Canada, along with their family members, as permanent residents Number of temporary caregivers and their family members who obtain permanent resident status TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Caregiver principal applicants support the needs of the Canadian labour market Caregiver principal applicants’ incidence of employment relative to the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2016 when baseline is available Calendar year 2020
Percentage of caregiver principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing TBD in 2016 when baseline is available Calendar year 2020
Rate of social assistance for caregiver principal applicants, five years after landing TBD in 2016 when baseline is available Calendar year 2020
Program 1.1.6: Canadian Experience Class
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Temporary residents who have demonstrated some ability to establish themselves in Canada transition to permanent residence in support of the labour market needs of Canada Canadian Experience Class (CEC) principal applicants’ incidence of employment as a percentage of the Canadian average, five years after landing +17% End of each calendar year
Percentage of CEC principal applicants with employment earnings at or above the Canadian average, five years after landing 40% End of each calendar year
Rate of social assistance for CEC principal applicants, five years after landing 0.8% End of each calendar year
Program 1.1.7: Federal Business Immigrants
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Federal business immigrants contribute investment, entrepreneurship skills and ideas towards strengthening the Canadian economy Number of Federal Business Immigrant principal applicants admitted to Canada TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Program 1.1.8: Quebec Business Immigrants
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Successful Quebec-selected Business Immigrant applicants and family members are admitted to Quebec Number of admissions of Quebec-selected Business Immigrants and family members destined to Quebec TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to efficiently manage the inventory of permanent resident applications and reduce overall processing times by managing intake for certain categories and managing the flow of applications to capitalize on where network capacity is available.
  • Facilitate the selection and processing of qualified permanent residents in accordance with the 2016 Levels Plan to meet Canada’s long-term economic and labour market demands.
  • Implement changes, as necessary, to the Express Entry system that align with emerging Government priorities and ensure the continuation of faster processing, the selection of those best placed to succeed in Canada, and labour market responsiveness that is informed by provincial, territorial and employer participation. Conduct Express Entry-specific nationwide and international promotion and outreach activities with partners and stakeholders.
  • Work with provinces and territories to improve outcomes and enhance the integrity of the Provincial Nominee Program business streams.
  • Support ESDC in working with provincial and territorial governments to develop a system of regulated companies to hire caregivers on behalf of families. This will simplify the hiring process for families as well as protect caregivers by allowing them to more easily change employers should they find themselves in bad or abusive situations.
  • Work with the Government of Quebec to promote business immigration program development that also supports Canada’s economic goals for immigration consistent with Quebec’s annual levels targets.

Program 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents

Rooted in objectives outlined in IRPA, the focus of this program is to establish and apply the rules governing entry into Canada of foreign nationals authorized for temporary work and study. Temporary economic migration enhances Canada’s trade, commerce, cultural, educational and scientific activities, in support of our overall economic and social prosperity and national interests. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas, work permits and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Students

IRCC supports a range of goals for immigration by managing the entry of international students to Canada. International students contribute to Canada’s educational and international competitiveness, and strengthen our educational institutions. International students are selected by Canadian institutions according to their respective criteria, and IRCC authorizes their entry into Canada to study by approving study permits and, where necessary, visas, which allow them to obtain a Canadian education. IRCC is responsible for ensuring that the proper documentation, financial and security requirements are met, including the bona fides of all applicants. In order to provide students with additional opportunities to obtain Canadian work experience, qualified international students are authorized to work either on or off-campus without a work permit, or as part of a co-op or internship program with a co-op work permit. Students who want to work in Canada after graduation can apply for a work permit under the Post-Graduation Work Permit (PGWP) component, which allows them to gain up to three years of Canadian work experience. Some PGWP holders will also be eligible to apply for permanent residence under the Canadian Experience Class or other programs. The selection and processing of international students involve the issuance of temporary resident visas (if required) and study permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Temporary Work Authorization

Foreign nationals can be authorized to work in Canada through various processes. Under situations that require a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), employers are able to hire foreign workers as a last resort to meet their short-term or acute labour and skills needs when qualified Canadian citizens or permanent residents are not available, ensuring that Canadians have the first opportunity for jobs where appropriate. To hire a temporary foreign worker to respond to labour market shortages, employers require an LMIA from Employment and Social Development Canada, which considers whether a Canadian or permanent resident is available, examines the wage and working conditions being offered, and assesses whether the job offer would have a negative, neutral or positive effect on the Canadian labour market. Once the potential employer is in possession of the LMIA, the foreign national may then apply for the work permit at a mission abroad, at the port of entry (if eligible) or inside Canada (if eligible). In certain situations, employers can also seek to employ foreign nationals to work in Canada without an LMIA. Exemptions from the LMIA process are offered where they support broader Canadian interests, such as the competitive advantages and reciprocal benefits that Canadians enjoy as a result of international agreements and partnerships (including North America Free Trade Agreement and others). Under these circumstances, the foreign national applies to IRCC for a work permit overseas, at a port of entry (if eligible) or from inside Canada (if eligible). IRCC’s role is to manage the authorization of foreign nationals to work in Canada. IRCC ensures the foreign national meets all admissibility and eligibility requirements and, when an LMIA is not required, considers the genuineness of the job offer, while also ensuring a robust operation is in place to enforce employer compliance with program requirements. The selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas (if required) and work permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 1.2.3: International Experience Canada

The International Experience Canada (IEC) Program facilitates bilateral, reciprocal agreements with other countries to allow travel and work exchange opportunities for young Canadians and foreign nationals aged 18-35. Exchanges with foreign countries contribute to national interests by strengthening Canada’s bilateral relations and supporting Canada’s economic and trade agenda. Most IEC exchanges occur through bilateral reciprocal Youth Mobility Agreements (YMAs) with other countries. Foreign participants are issued work permits that are exempt from the requirement of an LMIA on the basis that their work in Canada creates or maintains reciprocal employment for Canadians in other countries. Some foreign participants will also be eligible to apply for permanent residence under the Canadian Experience Class or other programs, thereby contributing to Canada’s permanent economic immigration objectives. Young Canadian participants in other countries obtain foreign work experience, which benefits their future careers in the Canadian workplace and contributes to Canada’s international competitiveness. The IEC Program has a global reciprocal quota of participants each year, and on an annual basis, negotiates bilateral quotas with each country with which Canada has a YMA. The “Participation Fee” paid by approved foreign participants generates revenue to fund program costs. Key program activities include YMA negotiation and liaison with new and existing countries; promotion of program participation to Canadians and foreign nationals; and stakeholder engagement to facilitate participation and enhance program awareness for Canadian youth. Foreign national participant application selection and processing involve the issuance of temporary resident visas (if required) and work permits to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants. Canadians’ applications are processed by the governments of the countries where they would like to participate.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 1.2
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   408 319 317
Spending 53,069,957 53,069,957 25,945,027 25,592,541

Planned spending declines in 2017–2018 and future years, representing the end of the funding profile for the LMIA and International Mobility (non-LMIA) streams. The total funding in 2016–2017 for LMIA and the International Mobility streams is $25.8 million.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Resource 2016−17
Planned Spending
2017−18
Planned Spending
2018−19
Planned Spending
1.2.1: International Students FTEs 79 79 79
Spending 7,505,368 7,404,550 7,349,733
1.2.2: Temporary Work Authorization FTEs 288 199 197
Spending 45,564,589 18,540,477 18,242,808
1.2.3: International Experience Canada FTEs 41 41 41
Gross Expenditures
Respendable Revenue
Net Revenue
9,937,812
(9,937,812)
0
9,937,812
(9,937,812)
0
9,937,812
(9,937,812)
0

Performance Measurement – Program 1.2 and Sub-Programs

Program 1.2: Temporary Economic Residents
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canada benefits from the timely entry of temporary economic residents Percentage of international student applications finalized within the established service standard New: 80%
Extensions: 80%
End of each calendar year
Percentage of work permit applications (submitted overseas) finalized within the established service standard 80% End of each calendar year
Percentage of IEC applications from foreign nationals finalized within service standards 80% End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 1.2.1: International Students
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Educational institutions and international students benefit from having foreign nationals study and work in Canada Number of student permit holder entries into Canada TBC based on operational capacity End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 1.2.2: Temporary Work Authorization
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Eligible foreign nationals authorized for temporary work enter Canada, consistent with regulations and standards Number of entries into Canada of foreign nationals authorized for temporary work TBC based on operational capacity End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 1.2.3: International Experience Canada
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Exchanges of Canadian and foreign participants are reciprocal Ratio of IEC foreign participants to Canadian participants 2:1 Calendar year 2019
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to efficiently manage temporary resident application processing, including managing volumes and adherence to service standards.
  • Support the Government of Canada’s initiative to make Canada a destination of choice for students.
  • Continue to reform the Temporary Work Authorization Program by implementing the new penalties for employer non-compliance that came into effect on December 1, 2015. These penalties apply to both the Temporary Foreign Worker and the International Mobility streams. Employers who violate the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations are now subject to potential bans from the program of varying lengths, as well as potential administrative monetary penalties of up to $100,000 per violation.
  • Support Employment and Social Development Canada in eliminating the $1,000 LMIA fee for families seeking caregivers to care for family members with physical and mental disabilities.
  • Implement changes to the application process for the IEC Program whereby processing no longer operates on a first-come, first-served basis. These changes will allow applicants who have received an invitation to apply from IRCC to create a profile and enter into a pool of candidates where they can apply for a work permit.

Strategic Outcome 2: Family and humanitarian migration that reunites families and offers protection to the displaced and persecuted

IRCC is committed to upholding Canada’s humanitarian tradition of reuniting families, resettling refugees and providing protection to those in need.

The Family Class, as set forth in IRPA allows permanent residents and Canadian citizens to sponsor their immediate family members (i.e., their spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, and dependent children), as well as parents and grandparents, for immigration to Canada. The permanent resident or Canadian citizen must undertake to provide for the basic needs of their sponsored relative for a set period of time, depending on the nature of the relationship. This program facilitates family reunification while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public.

As a signatory to the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, the 1967 Protocol, and the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, and further to provisions set forth in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Canada has international and domestic legal obligations to provide safe haven to individuals in need of protection. Canada meets these obligations through the in-Canada refugee protection system. In addition, Canada partners with other countries and with international and civil society organizations to come to the aid of refugees in need of protection through resettlement. Every year, Canada resettles approximately one out of every 10 refugees resettled globally. IRCC engages both domestic and international stakeholders to develop and implement timely, efficient and effective refugee protection policies and programs.

Benefits for Canadians

IRCC plays a significant role in upholding Canada’s international humanitarian commitments and domestic obligations and Canada’s reputation with regard to refugees and in promoting the Canadian values of openness, diversity, human rights and the rule of law. Through family sponsorship, IRCC’s efforts enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents to reunite with family members. Following recent reforms, IRCC’s refugee protection system ensures fast and fair review and decisions for those in genuine need of protection, and deters unfounded claims by minimizing factors that may attract refugee claims from persons who are not genuinely in need of protection. Refugee resettlement is part of the important role that Canada plays in addressing international humanitarian crises and contributes to the safety and security of Canadians.

The following programs and sub-programs support this Strategic Outcome:

Program 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration

IRCC’s family and discretionary programs support the Government of Canada’s social goals for immigration. The program’s objectives are to reunite family members in Canada, and to allow for the processing of exceptional cases. Family Class provisions of IRPA enable Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada to apply to sponsor eligible members of the Family Class, including spouses and partners, dependent children, and parents and grandparents. Discretionary provisions in the legislation are used in cases where there are humanitarian and compassionate considerations or for public policy reasons. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional and deserving cases not anticipated in the legislation and to support the Government of Canada in its humanitarian response to world events and crises. Eligibility assessment and processing involve the granting of permanent or temporary residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification

The objective of this program is to grant permanent resident status to foreign nationals who are the sponsored spouses, partners and dependent children (including adopted children) of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This supports the Government’s objective to reunite close family members while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. The sponsor, who is a permanent resident or Canadian citizen, is responsible for providing the basic needs of his or her spouse or partner for three years, and for their dependent children for up to 10 years. Processing involves determining the sponsor’s ability to meet the sponsorship obligations and verifying the bona fides of the relationships. Given the close family relationships involved, these family members are the highest priority for processing. Eligibility assessment and processing involve the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification

The objective of this program is to grant permanent resident status to sponsored foreign nationals who are the parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. This program makes it possible for Canadian citizens and permanent residents to be reunited with their extended family members, while ensuring that there is no undue cost to the general public. Sponsors must demonstrate, on the basis of three years of Canada Revenue Agency documentation, that they meet minimum necessary income thresholds to sponsor, and can meet their sponsorship obligations (which include providing for the basic needs of their parents and grandparents for 20 years). These requirements, together with this category’s lower processing priority, distinguish it from the spouses, partners and dependent children category. Processing involves the granting of permanent residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Sub-Program 2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations

The humanitarian and compassionate and public policy provisions of IRPA enable the Minister to address exceptional circumstances by granting an exemption from certain criteria or obligations of the Act or by granting permanent or temporary residence. These discretionary provisions provide the flexibility to approve exceptional cases that were not envisioned in the legislation. Under the humanitarian and compassionate provisions of IRPA, an applicant’s circumstances are assessed on a case-by-case basis, taking into account establishment in Canada, the best interests of a child, and other relevant circumstances brought forward for consideration. The public policy provision is a discretionary tool designed to grant permanent or temporary resident status to individuals in similar circumstances, all of whom must meet eligibility criteria defined in the public policy. The outcome of this program is that exceptional cases are treated with appropriate flexibility, in accordance with Canadian values. Eligibility assessment and processing involve the granting of permanent or temporary residence to qualified applicants, as well as the refusal of unqualified applicants.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 2.1
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   433 431 430
Spending 36,932,907 36,932,907 36,579,855 36,388,427
Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Resource 2016−17
Planned Spending
2017−18
Planned Spending
2018−19
Planned Spending
2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification FTEs 231 229 229
Spending 21,551,176 21,303,217 21,139,541
2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification FTEs 105 104 104
Spending 8,049,461 7,954,276 7,924,890
2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate Public Policy Considerations FTEs 97 98 97
Spending 7,332,270 7,322,362 7,323,996

Performance Measurement – Program 2.1 and Sub-Programs

Program 2.1: Family and Discretionary Immigration
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Canada reunites families and provides permanent residence for deserving cases in exceptional considerationsFootnote 10 Number of admissions for total Family Class, humanitarian and compassionate grounds, and public policy grounds TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 2.1.1: Spouses, Partners and Children Reunification
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Spouses, partners and children are reunited with their sponsor in Canada Number of admissions of spouses, partners and children TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Reunification applications for immediate family members are processed within published service standards Percentage adherence to the 12 month service standard for spouses, partners and children overseas 80% End of each fiscal year
Sub-Program 2.1.2: Parents and Grandparents Reunification
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Parents and grandparents are reunited with their sponsor in Canada Number of admissions of parents and grandparents TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 2.1.3: Humanitarian and Compassionate and Public Policy Considerations
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
On an exceptional basis, persons are admitted or are allowed to remain in Canada and acquire permanent resident status Number of persons granted permanent resident status on humanitarian and compassionate or public policy grounds due to their exceptional circumstances TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to efficiently manage the inventory of applications and reduce overall processing times, especially for spouses, by managing intake for certain categories and managing the flow of applications to capitalize on where network capacity is available.
  • Develop a plan to reduce processing times for family-class immigration in order reunite families more quickly and efficiently.
  • Explore options aimed at waiving the two-year conditional permanent resident status for new spouses entering Canada.
  • Restore the maximum age for dependants to 22 from 19 to better support permanent residents in bringing their children to Canada.
  • Double the cap for sponsorship applications for parents and grandparents from 5,000 to 10,000 in order to reunite more families.

Program 2.2: Refugee Protection

The Refugee Protection Program is in the first instance about saving lives and offering protection to the displaced and persecuted. Overseas, refugees and persons in refugee-like situations are selected by Canadian visa officers to be resettled as permanent residents to Canada. Flowing from Canada's international and domestic legal obligations, the in-Canada asylum system evaluates the claims of individuals seeking asylum in Canada and grants protected person status when a positive decision is rendered by the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (IRB), an independent, quasi-judicial tribunal.

Sub-Program 2.2.1: Government-Assisted Refugees

To guide and operate the Government-Assisted Refugees (GAR) Program, Canada works closely with the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and other referral agencies to identify Convention Refugees Abroad, who have no durable solution within a reasonable period of time, other than resettlement to Canada as permanent residents. The primary objectives of the program are to provide individual protection solutions to refugees, to affirm Canada’s humanitarian commitment to assist refugees in need of international protection through the provision of government assistance, and to assist the countries hosting them through responsibility sharing.

Sub-Program 2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees

The primary objective of the Privately Sponsored Refugees (PSR) Program is to partner with civil society to provide durable solutions to more refugees than would otherwise be admitted under the GAR Program. Canadian visa officers select as permanent residents members of the Convention Refugees Abroad and Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad classes who are referred by private sponsors for resettlement in Canada. These private sponsors provide the social, financial and emotional support to the refugees upon their arrival in Canada. The program is unique in its engagement of ordinary Canadians and permanent residents in Canada’s international refugee protection efforts and ensures an additional number of refugees are offered protection over and above those sponsored by the Government.

Sub-Program 2.2.3: Blended Visa Office Referred Refugees

Under the Blended Visa Office Referred Refugees (BVOR) Program, Convention Refugees Abroad, who have no durable solution within a reasonable period of time, other than resettlement to Canada as permanent residents, are referred by a Canadian visa office to be matched with a private sponsor. Subsequently, upon arrival in Canada, refugees receive six months of income support from the Government of Canada via the Resettlement Assistance Program and six months of income support from their sponsor. Private sponsors also provide arrival and orientation services, temporary accommodation, and ongoing emotional and social support for 12 months. The program is a unique public-private partnership that encourages faith-based, ethnocultural and other community organizations in Canada to play a larger role in offering durable solutions to refugees found to be in need of resettlement by the UNHCR, supporting the objectives of both the GAR and PSR programs.

Sub-Program 2.2.4: In-Canada Asylum

Flowing from Canada’s international and domestic legal obligations, Canada’s asylum system provides protection to persons fleeing persecution and risk of torture, risk to life, or risk of cruel treatment or punishment, by way of legislative and regulatory measures that enable Canada to meet those obligations. The program establishes fair and efficient procedures that uphold Canada’s respect for the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all human beings, while maintaining the overall integrity of the Canadian refugee determination system. Canada’s asylum system ensures that fair consideration is granted to those who come to Canada claiming persecution. Those found by the IRB to be in need of refugee protection receive protected person status, and may apply for permanent residence.

Sub-Program 2.2.5: Pre-removal Risk Assessment

Following Canada’s international commitment to the principle of non-refoulement, and provisions in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, the Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA) provides IRCC the ability to ensure that foreign nationals facing removals from Canada are not sent back to their country of origin where they would be in personal danger of persecution, torture (as defined under the Geneva Convention), cruel or unusual punishment, and risk to life is known to exist. IRCC processes applications for PRRA subject to the following restrictions: persons facing removal following a rejected claim for refugee protection may not apply for a PRRA until 12 months have passed; persons facing removal following a rejected claim who are nationals of a designated country of origin may not apply for a PRRA until three years have passed. IRCC further conducts ongoing monitoring for the issuance of exemptions to the PRRA bar based on an assessment of change in country conditions that present personal risks for individuals facing removals.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 2.2
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   300 240 239
Spending 28,013,358 28,013,358 21,997,034 21,942,007

Reduction in planned spending for this program is mainly attributable to the following items:

  • potential transfer of responsibilities and associated funding ($4.2 million) to the IRB for the PRRA Program;
  • in 2016–2017, there is an amount of $1.1 million for the Syrian refugee initiative under the GAR Program, with no funding in 2017–2018; and,
  • in 2016–2017, there is an amount of $0.7 million for the Syrian refugee initiative under the PSR Program, with no funding in 2017–2018.
Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Resource 2016−17
Planned Spending
2017−18
Planned Spending
2018−19
Planned Spending
2.2.1: Government-Assisted Refugees FTEs 46 35 35
Spending 6,169,850 5,032,204 4,999,563
2.2.2: Privately Sponsored Refugees FTEs 53 46 45
Spending 5,046,115 4,278,035 4,243,136
2.2.3: Blended Visa Office Referred Refugees FTEs 3 3 3
Spending 263,939 262,879 262,976
2.2.4: In-Canada Asylum FTEs 152 151 151
Spending 11,883,243 11,859,857 11,872,359
2.2.5: Pre-Removal Risk AssessmentFootnote 11 FTEs 46 5 5
Spending 4,650,211 564,059 563,973

Performance Measurement – Program 2.2 and Sub-Programs

Program 2.2: Refugee Protection
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Canada protects refugees in need of resettlement Percentage of resettled refugees in the world that Canada resettles (dependent on actions of other countries) TBC based on operational realities End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 2.2.1: Government-Assisted Refugees
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Government-assisted refugees (GARs) are granted protection and resettled to Canada Number of admissions of resettled GARs TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 2.2.2: Privately-Sponsored Refugees
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Privately-sponsored refugees (PSRs) are granted protection and resettled to Canada Number of admissions of resettled PSRs TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Private sponsors participate in PSR resettlement Number of approved PSR sponsorship applications TBC based on levels plan and operational capacity End of each calendar year
Percentage of approved sponsorship applications for Sponsorship Agreement Holders (SAHs) as compared to the maximum sponsorship applications allowed for all SAHs TBC based on levels plan and operational realities End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 2.2.3: Blended Visa Office Referred Refugees
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Blended Visa office referred refugees (BVORs) are granted protection and resettled to Canada Number of admissions of resettled BVORs TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Private sponsors participate in BVOR resettlement Percentage of Sponsorship Agreement Holders (SAHs) who sponsor BVORs that landed TBC based on levels plan and operational realities End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 2.2.4: In-Canada Asylum
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Protected persons in-Canada and their dependants abroad are admitted as permanent residents Number of admissions of protected persons in-Canada and their dependants abroad TBD (levels plan) End of each calendar year
Decisions made on eligibility of in-Canada refugee claims are timely Percentage of decisions on eligibility of refugee claims rendered within three working days ≥ 97% End of each fiscal year
Sub-Program 2.2.5: Pre-Removal Risk Assessment
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Pre-Removal Risk Assessment (PRRA) decisions are made in compliance with IRPA Percentage of PRRA decisions returned to IRCC by the Federal Court for redetermination < 1% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights
  • In early 2016, the Government of Canada realized its goal of welcoming a total of 25,000 government-assisted, blended visa office referred and privately sponsored Syrian refugees. Between March 1, 2016 and December 31, 2016, the Government will also admit an additional 10,000 GARs. It will also continue to make available to private sponsors BVORs from a variety of populations including Syria.
  • Continue to support and work with the UNHCR to process refugees more quickly and efficiently to advance Canada’s resettlement priorities, including existing multi-year resettlement commitments. Also continue to strengthen collaboration with the International Organization for Migration, a key partner in assisting Canada in refugee resettlement.
  • Continue to efficiently lead a whole-of-government effort ‎to expeditiously process, admit and settle in communities across Canada, refugees and protected persons in line with the 2016 Immigration Levels plan, including an additional 10,000 Syrian GARs.
  • Continue close engagement with provinces, territories, municipalities, private and non-profit organizations, and private sponsors in order to welcome resettled refugees.
  • In response to the three-year evaluation of the reforms to the in-Canada asylum system, examine options for strengthening the system, including establishing an expert panel, which could make recommendations on designated countries of origin, and providing a right to appeal for citizens from those countries.

Strategic Outcome 3: Newcomers and citizens participate in fostering an integrated society

Through IRPA and the Citizenship Act, as well as a broader constitutional and legislative suite that includes the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canadian Human Rights Act, the Official Languages Act and the Employment Equity Act, among others, the Government of Canada is committed to facilitating the participation of all Canadians in the social, cultural, economic and civic spheres of Canadian society. Accordingly, the focus of this strategic outcome is on a “two-way street” approach that works with communities and Canadian institutions to assist individuals to become active, connected and productive citizens.

Working with a wide range of social supports, including other levels of government, voluntary sector and community partners, employers, school boards and others, IRCC seeks to strengthen social integration by providing newcomers with tools to fully participate in the labour market; promoting social and cultural connections; encouraging active civic participation; and fostering a sense of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

Benefits for Canadians

Canadians enjoy a higher quality of life when citizens and newcomers actively participate in all aspects of society, contribute to a prosperous economy, and have a strong sense of civic pride and attachment.

The following programs and sub-programs support this Strategic Outcome:

Program 3.1: Newcomer Settlement and Integration

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism ActFootnote 12, the Employment Equity Act and IRPA, programming is developed based on policies that support the settlement, resettlement, adaptation and integration of newcomers into Canadian society. Ultimately, the goal of integration is to encourage newcomers to contribute to Canada’s economic, social, political and cultural development. All permanent residents are eligible for settlement and integration programs. Programming is delivered by third parties (including provincial and municipal governments, school boards and post-secondary institutions, settlement service organizations and other non-governmental actors, and the private sector) across the country.

Sub-Program 3.1.1: Settlement

Settlement refers to a short period (three to five years) of adaptation by newcomers, during which the Government provides support and services. IRCC’s Settlement Program assists immigrants and refugees to overcome barriers specific to the newcomer experience, such as a lack of official language skills, limited knowledge of Canada and the recognition of foreign credentials. The program provides language learning services for newcomers, community and employment bridging services, settlement information, and support services that facilitate access to settlement programming. Also, through the Foreign Credentials Referral Office, the program provides information, path-finding and referral services to internationally trained individuals to have their credentials assessed quickly so they can find work in the fields in which they have been trained. Most services are designed and delivered by service provider organizations (SPOs); however, certain services (such as information provision) are delivered directly by IRCC in Canada and overseas.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.1: Language Training

The ability of newcomers to communicate in one of Canada’s official languages has long been recognized as key to both the initial settlement and the longer-term integration of immigrants. Language learning services are intended to help newcomers develop sufficient linguistic communication skills (including literacy) to enable newcomers to function in Canadian society and contribute to the economy. Through the Settlement Program, IRCC funds SPOs to deliver various language learning services for newcomers, including language assessment and official language instruction. This program uses transfer payment funding from the Settlement Program.

Sub-Sub-Program 3.1.1.2: Community and Labour Market Integration Services

Newcomers face a variety of barriers to integration, including the need for information and connections to social and economic networks. Settlement information, bridging and other support services including foreign credential referrals, attempt to address these barriers. SPOs are funded to design and deliver bridging services that facilitate newcomers’ connections to the labour market and the wider community. Through IRCC offices and SPOs, the program also provides prospective immigrants and newcomers with access to settlement-related information so that they can make informed decisions about immigrating to and settling in Canada. The program also funds SPOs to offer services that improve newcomers’ access to settlement programming; these support services include child-minding and transportation. Information on foreign credential recognition is provided in-person and by telephone on behalf of the Foreign Credentials Referral Office by Service Canada and through the IRCC’s Web site to prospective immigrants overseas. This program uses transfer payment funding from the Settlement Program.

Sub-Program 3.1.2: Grant to Quebec

Under the Canada-Quebec Accord, signed in 1991, Canada has devolved settlement and resettlement responsibility to Quebec, with a grant that includes reasonable compensation for costs. The compensation to Quebec covers services for reception services and linguistic, cultural and economic integration services, provided that they are equivalent to similar federal services in other parts of the country. An objective of the Accord is, among other things, the preservation of Quebec’s demographic importance within Canada and the integration of immigrants into that province in a manner that respects the distinct identity of Quebec. The Accord provides Quebec with exclusive responsibility for the selection of immigrants destined to the province (except for family reunification and asylum seekers in Canada) as well as the reception and linguistic and cultural integration of these immigrants (including resettlement of refugees). Under the Accord, Canada is responsible for defining overall immigration objectives, national levels, admissibility, selecting family category and asylum seekers in Canada and citizenship. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant for the Canada-Quebec Accord on Immigration.

Sub-Program 3.1.3: Immigration Loan

The Immigration Loans Program is a statutory program under IRPA. It ensures that some persons, otherwise unable to pay for the costs of transportation to Canada and medical admissibility exams, have access to a funding source. Assistance loans may also be approved for newcomers in need to cover initial settlement expenses such as rental and utilities deposits. The main target group for the program is resettled refugees. These individuals have undergone extreme hardship and most often have few personal resources and are therefore unable to access traditional lending institutions. Canadian visa officers authorize the transportation and admissibility loans and the International Organization for Migration arranges travel and medical exams for refugees and pays these costs. IRCC reimburses them and the refugee reimburses IRCC through loan repayments. Assistance loans are authorized by in-Canada officers. The interest-bearing loans are repayable in full and payment plans vary by the value of the loan and the recipients’ ability to repay while integrating.

Sub-Program 3.1.4: Resettlement Assistance Program

The Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP) provides direct financial support and funds immediate and essential services for RAP clients, including government-assisted refugees and persons in refugee-like situations admitted to Canada under a public policy consideration or on humanitarian and compassionate grounds, to meet their resettlement needs. In most cases, RAP clients have undergone extreme hardship and may lack the social networks and the financial resources to assist in addressing the needs associated with becoming established in a new country that would support their settlement in Canada. Income support is delivered directly by IRCC to RAP clients, typically for up to 12 months, if the RAP client’s income is insufficient to meet his or her own needs and those of any accompanying dependants. In some cases, RAP clients also receive start-up allowances for expenses related to furniture and other household supplies. Immediate and essential services are supported through contributions to SPOs in all provinces in Canada except Quebec, which delivers similar settlement services to refugees destined to that province through the Canada-Quebec Accord. RAP services include, but are not limited to, port of entry services, assistance with temporary accommodations, help locating permanent accommodation, help with acquiring basic knowledge of everyday life skills, orientation sessions, information and orientation on financial and non-financial topics, as well as life skills training, and links to settlement programming and mandatory federal and provincial programs. In addition to the above, privately sponsored refugees sponsored as part of a blended initiative under the Blended Visa Office Referred Refugees Program receive limited (up to six months) income support and RAP services (port of entry only). This program uses transfer payment funding from the RAP.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 3.1
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   368 364 334
Spending 1,174,026,452 1,174,026,452 1,065,220,715 1,062,214,554

Reduction in planned spending is mainly due to reduced funding, from $153.6 million in 2016–2017 to $45.1 million in 2017–2018, in the Resettlement Assistance Program for the Syrian refugee initiative.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Resource 2016−17
Planned Spending
2017−18
Planned Spending
2018−19
Planned Spending
3.1.1: Settlement FTEs 279 275 271
Spending 655,360,163 654,619,854 653,957,479
3.1.1.1: Language Training FTEs 95 93 91
Spending 301,695,942 301,356,388 301,017,869
3.1.1.2: Community and Labour Market Integration Services FTEs 184 182 180
Spending 353,664,221 353,263,466 352,939,610
3.1.2: Grant to Quebec FTEs 0 0 0
Spending 345,059,000 345,059,000 345,059,000
3.1.3: Immigration Loan FTEs 12 12 12
Spending 1,249,441 1,249,833 1,250,081
3.1.4: Resettlement Assistance Program FTEs 77 77 51
Spending 172,357,848 64,292,028 61,947,994

Performance Measurement – Program 3.1 and Sub-Programs and Sub-Sub-Programs

Program 3.1: Newcomer Settlement and Integration
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
NewcomersFootnote 13 contribute to Canada’s economic, social and cultural development Percentage difference of labour force participation of newcomers residing in Canada 10 years or less, in comparison with the Canadian-born (for core working age, 25-54 years) ≥ -12% End of each calendar year
Percentage difference of newcomers who are 15 years and older, who in the past 12 months volunteered, or participated at least monthly in a group, association or organization, in comparison with the Canadian-born population ≥ -10% Every seven years
Percentage difference of newcomers residing in Canada 10 years or less, who are 15 years and older and who have a somewhat strong or a very strong sense of belonging to Canada in comparison with the Canadian-born population ≥ -1% Every seven years
Sub-Program 3.1.1: Settlement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Clients make informed decisions about life in CanadaFootnote 14 Percentage of clients who are able to make informed decisions about life in Canada Target will be selected once the baseline data is established in 2016 End of each fiscal year
Clients use official languages to function and participate in Canadian society Average percentage of clients (landed in Canada for at least one year) who use official languages to function and participate in Canadian society Target will be selected once the baseline data is established in 2016 End of each fiscal year
Clients participate in society Percentage of clients (landed in Canada for at least one year) who participated in Canadian society in the last year Target will be selected once the baseline data is established in 2016 End of each fiscal year
Sub-Program 3.1.1.1: Language Training
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Clients learn official language skills for adapting to Canadian society Annual percentage of language training clients who increased at least one Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) level for at least three of four skills ≥ 15% End of each fiscal year
Annual percentage of language training clients who have completed CLB four or above in listening and speaking ≥ 10% End of each fiscal year
Percentage of clients who reported an improvement in official language skills and attributed their improvement to IRCC language training TBD once the baseline data is established in 2016 End of each fiscal year
Sub-Program 3.1.1.2: Community and Labour Market Integration Services
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Clients gain knowledge of life in Canada Percentage of clients who acquired knowledge about life in Canada and attributed it to government web sites or service providers TBD once the baseline data is established in 2016 End of each fiscal year
Clients acquire skills to function in the Canadian work environment Percentage of clients who received IRCC services and acquired knowledge about skills to function in the Canadian work environment and attribute this to IRCC services TBD once the baseline data is established in 2016 End of each fiscal year
Percentage of employed clients who received IRCC services and who are working in a job that either matches or is related to their skills and experience TBD once the baseline data is established in 2016 End of each fiscal year
Sub-Program 3.1.2: Grant to Quebec
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Quebec provides settlement and integration services to newcomers in the province that are comparable to services provided across Canada Percentage of key areas examined in which services provided in Quebec are found to be comparable to services provided across Canada 100% Q1-Q2 every fiscal year
Sub-Program 3.1.3: Immigration Loan
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Individuals in need receive and repay immigration loans Percentage of resettled refugees by family unit (i.e., principal applicants) that receive transportation and/or admissibility loans 100% End of each calendar year
Percentage of resettled refugees by family unit (i.e., principal applicants) that receive settlement assistance loans 40% End of each calendar year
Percentage of loan recipients who repay their immigration loans within the original prescribed loan period 75% End of each calendar year
Sub-Program 3.1.4: Resettlement Assistance Program
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Government-assisted refugees have access to IRCC settlement services Percentage of Government-assisted refugees outside Quebec who access settlement services within six months since landing ≥ 85% End of each fiscal year
Government-assisted refugees have their immediate and essential needs met Percentage of Government-assisted refugees who report that their immediate and essential resettlement needs were met by the RAP services ≥ 80% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights
  • Implement integration strategies that support the linguistic duality of Canada.
  • Continue with improvements to foreign credentials recognition and labour market integration.
  • Work with other levels of government, non-governmental organizations, partners and volunteers across the country to help all refugees, including Syrians, meet their immediate and essential needs upon arrival, these being access to critical health, financial and social services, as well as obtaining language training and employment services.
  • Expand the network of RAP service provider organizations to better deliver services to government-assisted refugees.
  • Implement recommendations from the departmental evaluation of the Immigration Loans Program and develop options for the future of the Program.
  • Implement a management response and action plan to address the recommendations found within the Refugee Resettlement and RAP evaluation.

Program 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians

The purpose of the Citizenship Program is to administer citizenship legislation and promote the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship. IRCC administers the acquisition of Canadian citizenship by developing, implementing and applying legislation, regulations and policies that protect the integrity of Canadian citizenship and allow eligible applicants to be granted citizenship or be provided with a proof of citizenship. In addition, the program promotes citizenship, to both newcomers and the Canadian-born, through various events, materials and projects. Promotional activities focus on enhancing knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions and values, as well as fostering an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship.

Sub-Program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness

The Citizenship Awareness Program aims to enhance the meaning of Canadian citizenship for both newcomers and the Canadian-born and to increase a sense of belonging to Canada. Through knowledge of Canada’s history, institutions and values, as well as the rights and responsibilities associated with citizenship, newcomers and the Canadian-born are better equipped for active citizenship and can contribute to the development of an integrated society. The program undertakes various knowledge-building and promotional activities such as citizenship ceremonies, citizenship reaffirmation ceremonies, Citizenship Week and the distribution of citizenship educational publications (e.g., Discover Canada: The Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship study guide, the Welcome to Canada guide). IRCC also partners with public and private stakeholders on citizenship awareness activities.

Sub-Program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation

Citizenship processing activities include interpreting and administering the Citizenship Act and Regulations, managing the naturalization process (whereby non-citizens become citizens), issuing proof of citizenship to those who are citizens by birth or by naturalization, and maintaining these records. The processing of applications for Canadian citizenship contributes to newcomers’ abilities to participate in all aspects of Canadian life and enhances their successful integration into Canadian society. IRCC reviews files particularly where there are allegations of fraud and collects and analyses information to determine if a recommendation to initiate revocation proceedings should be made to the Minister.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 3.2
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   774 758 758
Spending 62,018,218 62,018,218 60,846,915 60,875,272
Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Resource 2016−17
Planned Spending
2017−18
Planned Spending
2018−19
Planned Spending
3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness FTEs 28 28 31
Spending 2,775,629 3,014,272 3,392,654
3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation FTEs 746 730 727
Spending 59,242,589 57,832,643 57,482,618

Performance Measurement – Program 3.2 and Sub-Programs

Program 3.2: Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canadian citizenship is a valued status: newcomers have a desire to become Canadian, and established Canadians are proud of their citizenship Take-up rates of citizenship among eligible newcomers ≥ 75% Calendar year 2016
Percentage of Canadians who are proud to be Canadian ≥ 80% Calendar year 2018
The integrity of Canadian citizenship is protected Percentage of applicants referred to a citizenship hearing with judges and/or citizenship officers to protect the integrity of citizenship 5–10% End of each fiscal year
Program 3.2.1: Citizenship Awareness
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Newcomers and established Canadians are made aware of responsibilities and privileges associated with Canadian citizenship Percentage of enhancedFootnote 15 citizenship ceremonies held in partnership with community or external organizations ≥ 15% End of each fiscal year
Percentage of applicants who write and pass the written citizenship knowledge test 80–90% End of each fiscal year
Number of Discover Canada guides distributed (printed and downloaded) ≥ 800,000 End of each fiscal year
Program 3.2.2: Citizenship Acquisition, Confirmation and Revocation
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Applications for proofs and grants of citizenship are processed Total number of decisions for grants of citizenship TBC based on operational capacity End of each fiscal year
Total number of decisions for proofs of citizenship TBC based on operational capacity End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights
  • Introduce and implement amendments to the Citizenship Act to remove the Government’s ability to revoke the citizenship of dual nationals on national interest grounds, to restore credit for time spent as a foreign student or other temporary resident for those applying for citizenship, and to eliminate the requirement for new citizens to declare that they intend to reside in Canada.
  • Work to reduce application processing times for citizenship and adhere to the 12-month processing service standard (for applications received after April 1, 2015). This will be achieved by managing the flow of applications to capitalize on where network capacity is available, as well as by exploring efficiencies from modernization initiatives to improve processing times.
  • Continue to make improvements to the efficiency and effectiveness of the Citizenship Program, to enhance efforts to promote awareness of the values of Canadian citizenship, and protect the integrity of the citizenship process.
  • In preparation for Canada 150, to be celebrated in 2017, update the citizenship study guide, Discover Canada: The Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship, and develop material to help citizenship applicants better prepare for the citizenship knowledge test.

Note to the reader: Since responsibility for the Canadian Multiculturalism Act has been transferred to the Department of Canadian Heritage as of November 4, 2015, the planning and financial information under the Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians Program should be considered provisional. The Department of Canadian Heritage will report on its responsibilities under the Act in future reports.

Program 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians

In accordance with the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, the Multiculturalism Program seeks to build an integrated, socially cohesive society, improve the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population, and engage in discussions on multiculturalism, integration and diversity at the international level. To advance these objectives, the Multiculturalism Program provides grants and contributions to not-for-profit organizations, the private sector, non-federal public institutions and individuals, conducts direct public outreach and promotional activities, helps federal institutions to meet their obligations under the Act, supports the annual tabling in Parliament of a report on the operation of the Act, and engages non-federal public institutions seeking to respond to diversity. The Multiculturalism Program also supports Canada’s participation in international agreements and institutions.

Sub-Program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness

Multiculturalism Awareness comprises a suite of policy, program, public engagement, public education and promotional activities. In addition to developing policies that shape Canada's stance on diversity issues, grants and contributions are disbursed to successful funding applicants that seek to support the Multiculturalism Program's objectives of building an integrated, socially cohesive society through enhanced intercultural/interfaith understanding, civic memory and pride, respect for core democratic values, and participation in society and the economy. Multiculturalism Awareness also entails direct public outreach and promotional activities designed to engage citizens and newcomers in multiculturalism issues (for example, Asian Heritage Month, Black History Month and the Paul Yuzyk Award for Multiculturalism). The Multiculturalism Awareness Program is also a locus for Canada’s participation in international agreements and institutions such as the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant in support of the Multiculturalism Program and from the contribution in support of the Multiculturalism Program.

Sub-Program 3.3.2: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support

Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support efforts are directed toward improving the responsiveness of institutions to the needs of a diverse population. To help federal institutions meet their obligations under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act, this program leads the Multiculturalism Champions Network, which serves as a forum for discussing shared challenges, best practices, lessons learned and tools to help institutions implement the Act. The program develops the Annual Report on the Operation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act for tabling in Parliament, which fulfils the Minister's obligations under the Act, and serves as an informative tool for institutions seeking best practices. Dialogue with provinces and territories is also provided through the Multiculturalism Program-led Federal-Provincial-Territorial Network of Officials Responsible for Multiculturalism Issues. Lastly, the program fosters policy relationships with the Canadian Race Relations Foundation and the Global Centre for Pluralism. This program uses transfer payment funding from the grant in support of the Multiculturalism Program and from the contribution in support of the Multiculturalism Program.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 3.3
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   40 40 40
Spending 12,100,261 12,100,261 12,204,636 12,207,624

No significant variances over the three planning years. However, this program will be the responsibility of Canadian Heritage in 2016–2017.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Resource 2016−17
Planned Spending
2017−18
Planned Spending
2018−19
Planned Spending
3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness FTEs 35 35 35
Spending 11,497,873 11,579,803 11,582,676
3.3.2: Federal And Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support FTEs 5 5 5
Spending 602,388 624,833 624,948

Performance Measurement – Program 3.3 and Sub-Programs

Program 3.3: Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Program participants are given information or tools to support an integrated society Annual percentage of program respondents who report that they are more enabled to support an integrated society ≥ 70% End of each fiscal year
Program 3.3.1: Multiculturalism Awareness
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Program participants have an increased civic memory and respect for Canada’s core democratic values Annual percentage of program participants reporting increased civic memory and respect for Canada’s core democratic values ≥ 70% End of each fiscal year
Program participants report a better understanding of a religious, ethnic or cultural group that is different from their own Annual percentage of program participants reporting increased intercultural/interfaith understanding ≥ 70% End of each fiscal year
Program 3.3.2: Federal and Public Institutional Multiculturalism Support
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Federal institutions report on their responsiveness to the needs of a diverse society Percentage of respondents (federal institutions) who report on their implementation of the Canadian Multiculturalism Act ≥ 75% End of each fiscal year
Federal institutions are supported in meeting their obligations under the Canadian Multiculturalism Act Participation rate of federal institutions in official multiculturalism activitiesFootnote 16 60% End of each fiscal year
Number of support or outreach activities provided to federal institutions ≥ 5 End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlight
  • On November 5, 2015, the Government of Canada announced machinery changes that included the transfer of the Multiculturalism Program from IRCC to Canadian Heritage. As such, the Departments will work together to enable a smooth and seamless transition of the program and its resources.

Strategic Outcome 4: Managed migration and facilitated travel that promote Canadian interests and protect the health, safety and security of Canadians

Canada welcomes thousands of permanent residents, foreign nationals authorized for temporary work, international students and visitors each year. IRCC manages the movement of people within the context of a more responsive immigration system that benefits Canada’s economic, social and cultural development while at the same time protecting the health, safety and security of all Canadians. IRCC also ensures that Canadians can travel freely across international borders by abiding by international standards and specifications and applying rigour in the administration and monitoring of Canada’s Passport Program. To manage health issues related to immigration, IRCC develops and implements risk mitigation strategies in cooperation with the Public Health Agency of Canada, provinces and territories, and partner countries. Any residual public health risks regarding the transmission of infectious diseases are mitigated through medical surveillance of newly arrived permanent and temporary residents as required. To protect Canadians—and to ensure that the benefits of a more responsive immigration system are not undermined—IRCC works with the Canada Border Services Agency, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service to conduct appropriate background screening of both immigrants and temporary residents and to identify applicants who could pose a security risk to the country. IRCC shares information with these organizations, fostering timely and effective delivery of its program.

Internationally, migration and humanitarian issues continue to gain the attention of governments, bilateral and multilateral forums, non-governmental organizations, and academic and other research institutes. IRCC plays an important role in framing and advancing international dialogues on migration and integration policy, refugee protection and governance. These dialogues explore the links between migration policy and development assistance, health, the environment, trade, and the movement of human capital. IRCC works to develop and implement a strategic agenda on global migration and refugee protection, and to advance Canada’s policy and program priorities.

Benefits for Canadians

Growing international migration has increased the possibility of Canadians being exposed to disease outbreaks and infectious diseases. IRCC and its partners in health management work to reduce the impact of identified risks on the Canadian population.

Policies and programs that affect the international movement of people—across Canada’s borders and outside them—have a direct bearing on the safety and security of Canada and Canadians at large, whether they are at home, travelling and/or conducting trade abroad. Working in collaboration with domestic and international partners, IRCC strives to achieve an effective balance between security and facilitation through the use and application of recognized identity management and travel document standards and specifications. Strengthening Canada’s refugee programs and demonstrating continued leadership in refugee protection, human rights and the promotion of cultural diversity through active participation in various international and regional forums and partnerships support Canada’s broader contribution to a safe and secure world. Finally, coordinated and responsible sharing of information supports a fast response to threats to the safety and security of Canadians.

The following programs and sub-programs support this Strategic Outcome:

Program 4.1: Health Protection

This program aims to provide effective immigration health services to manage the health aspect of migrant entry and settlement to Canada, and facilitate the arrival of resettled refugees to Canada and their integration while contributing to the protection of the health and safety of all Canadians and contributing to the maintenance of sustainable Canadian health and social services.

The program aims to evaluate health risks related to immigration and coordinate with international and Canadian health partners to develop risk management strategies and processes to assess the health risks posed by applicants wishing to immigrate to Canada. The strategies, processes and interventions are intended to reduce the impact of the risks identified on the health of Canadians and on Canada’s health and social services.

Sub-Program 4.1.1: Health Screening

This program aims to manage the health risks related to permanent and temporary residence according to the three grounds for inadmissibility under IRPA, which are: (1) danger to public health, (2) danger to public safety and (3) excessive demand on health or social services.

The Immigration Medical Examination (IME) is a tool used to screen for infectious diseases of public health significance in all applicants for permanent residence and certain applicants for temporary residence. It includes x-rays and lab tests that identify applicants who could pose health threats to Canadians or to the Canadian health and social systems. Those who are considered admissible on health grounds are cleared for entry into Canada; those who are found with infectious disease of public health significance are referred for treatment, where relevant, before admittance to Canada; those who are a danger to public health or public safety or are deemed to cause excessive demand on Canada’s health and social system are deemed inadmissible.

Sub-Program 4.1.2: Medical Surveillance and Notification

Section 38(1) of IRPA sets danger to public health as one key condition of inadmissibility to Canada.

Applicants for temporary or permanent residence in Canada whose Immigration Medical Assessments (IMAs) demonstrate that one of their health conditions may pose risks to public health require further health assessment and monitoring following their landing in Canada in order to ensure that they do not represent a danger to public health.

The Medical Surveillance and Notification Program informs provincial and territorial public health authorities of applicants who require medical surveillance in order to ensure that the terms and conditions of landing are met.

Sub-Program 4.1.3: Interim Federal Health

The Interim Federal Health (IFH) Program provides temporary coverage of health-care benefits to protected persons, including resettled refugees, refugee claimants, persons detained under IRPA, and certain others who are not eligible for provincial or territorial health insurance. The IFH Program provides six types of coverage. Eligibility and type of coverage under the IFH Program are determined by the beneficiary’s immigration status in Canada. The program helps protect public health and public safety and supports the successful settlement of resettled refugees receiving government support. IFH Program beneficiaries with valid coverage access health services through registered health care providers, who are reimbursed directly by the IFH Program claims administrator for covered services.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 4.1
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   80 80 80
Spending 75,135,278 75,135,278 60,593,922 60,583,383

Reduction in planned spending is mainly due to the reduction in funding for the Syrian refugee initiative from $14.5 million in 2016–2017 to $0 in 2017–2018.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Resource 2016−17
Planned Spending
2017−18
Planned Spending
2018−19
Planned Spending
4.1.1: Health Screening FTEs 58 58 58
Spending 7,371,652 7,247,577 7,235,673
4.1.2: Medical Surveillance and Notification FTEs 12 12 12
Spending 1,313,285 1,314,074 1,314,781
4.1.3: Interim Federal Health FTEs 10 10 10
Spending 66,450,341 52,032,271 52,032,929

Performance Measurement – Program 4.1 and Sub-Programs

Program 4.1: Health Protection
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Immigration health services are in place to protect public health and public safety and the burden on the health system Percentage of permanent residents with a valid immigration medical assessment (IMA)Footnote 17 at landing 100% End of each calendar year
Eligible clients receive coverage for health services under the Interim Federal Health (IFH) Program Percentage of eligible clients who receive coverage under the IFH Program 100% End of each calendar year
Program 4.1.1: Health Screening
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Applicants for permanent and temporary residence who pose a risk to public health and/or public safety and/or may be reasonably expected to cause excessive demand on the Canadian social and/or health-care systems are identified Percentage of applicants that should be identified as inadmissible based on the Immigration medical exam (IME) results, and that are coded as inadmissible by IRCC medical staff 100% End of each calendar year
Percentage of new cases of inactive tuberculosis (TB) found during an IMA over total number of IMAs 1.5%–2% End of each calendar year
Program 4.1.2: Medical Surveillance and Notification
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Provincial and territorial public health authorities are notified, for the purposes of medical surveillance, of migrants who pose public health risks Percentage of migrants identified as having inactive TB who landed in Canada and were reported to provincial or territorial health authorities 100% End of each calendar year
Percentage of identified cases of human immunodeficiency virus who landed in Canada and were reported to provincial or territorial health authorities (except for Nova Scotia and Nunavut—which elected to not receive the information) 100% End of each calendar year
Program 4.1.3: Interim Federal Health
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Eligible clients receive health services that reduce risks to the health and safety of Canadians Percentage of refugee claimants who received an IME covered by the IFH Program 100% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to screen applicants for medical conditions that are likely to endanger public health and safety or to cause excessive demand on health and social services.
  • Continue to report to Canadian provincial and territorial public health authorities for approved applicants with a condition requiring medical surveillance upon their arrival in Canada.
  • Restore the IFH Program to pre-2012 coverage and deliver the program in accordance with the Government’s direction.

Program 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management

IRCC facilitates the travel of bona fide permanent residents, visitors, students and temporary workers while protecting the health, safety and security of Canadians by effectively managing migration access. This is accomplished through a variety of policy and operational measures, including through the establishment of visa and other document entry requirements and otherwise maintaining the policy framework for terms and conditions of entry, admissibility criteria, anti-fraud measures, negotiations of bilateral and multilateral information-sharing agreements and treaties, as well as setting identity management practices. IRCC also provides assistance to illegal migrants who are deemed destined to Canada, to return them to their home country of origin. Strategic partnership engagements with security and public safety-related departments and international organizations are another essential component of this program.

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Identity Management

Identity management provides the foundation for all decision-making processes at IRCC by establishing, confirming and managing the identity of each IRCC client across the temporary resident, permanent resident, refugee and citizenship lines of business. This program seeks to ensure that the personal identifiers, identity documents and biometric information of each client are collected, protected and managed appropriately at IRCC. This program contributes to fraud prevention and strengthened program integrity by helping ensure that services are delivered to the correct individual, which in turn allows IRCC to streamline its interactions with repeat clientele and develop efficiencies in processing and reviewing applications in multiple business lines.

Sub-Program 4.2.2: Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents

The Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and Regulations lay out the eligibility and admissibility requirements for foreign nationals seeking entry to Canada as temporary residents (TR) or permanent residents (PR). Various authorizations and/or documents may be required for TRs and new PRs before entry, such as: an electronic travel authorization (eTA) for TRs from visa-exempt countries, a visa for TRs from visa-required countries, a PR card or PR travel document for a person who has become a permanent resident.

This program allows IRCC to manage eligibility and admissibility to Canada by screening clients against safety and security criteria established in cooperation with its federal security partners. Once a client passes both eligibility and admissibility screening, the client is issued the appropriate status or document and will become a temporary resident or permanent resident when the document is validated at a port of entry. Under specific conditions, IRCC has the discretion to issue a Temporary Resident Permit or a Public Policy Temporary Resident Visa to individuals who are inadmissible to Canada, if their entry into Canada is justified. This gives IRCC the flexibility to address exceptional circumstances while maintaining the integrity of Canada’s immigration program.

Sub-Program 4.2.3: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants

The purpose of the Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants (GAIM) Program is to provide assistance to migrants intercepted as part of efforts to deter and prevent or disrupt illegal organized human-smuggling operations that are believed to be destined to Canada. The GAIM Program reflects IRCC’s role in Canada’s whole-of-government strategy to combat human-smuggling activities and responds to the need for Canada to have a program to manage the consequences of these activities. The program assists illegal migrants in returning to their home country of origin by providing basic needs and medical support to stranded irregular migrants, assisting in the reintegration of returned individuals, supporting capacity building activities for governments of transit states, delivering information and awareness activities in countries of origin, and conducting research in support of the program. The program provides transfer payments in the form of contributions to trusted international, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations (such as the International Organization for Migration). This program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants (GAIM) Program.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 4.2
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   946 928 969
Spending 154,340,892 154,340,892 148,165,559 184,014,280

Reduction in planned spending from 2016–2017 to 2017–2018 is mainly due to a reprofile of $4.3 million from 2015–2016 to 2016–2017 for eTA, and a portion of an Entry Exit reprofile of $0.7 million from 2015–2016 to 2016–2017.

Increase in planned spending from 2017–2018 to 2018–2019 is due to the following items:

  • increase of $43.3 million in funding for biometric expansion;
  • decrease of $1.4 million in funding for the Citizenship and Temporary Residence initiatives from 2017–2018 to 2018–2019;
  • decrease of $3.0 million in funding for Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants (Contributions); and,
  • other internal realignments.
Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Sub-Programs
Sub-Program Resource 2016−17
Planned Spending
2017−18
Planned Spending
2018−19
Planned Spending
4.2.1: Identity Management FTEs 338 325 370
Spending 70,621,991 66,662,779 109,272,853
4.2.2: Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents FTEs 605 600 599
Spending 80,476,798 78,208,116 74,741,427
4.2.3: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants FTEs 3 3
Spending 3,242,103 3,294,664

Performance Measurement – Program 4.2 and Sub-Programs

Program 4.2: Migration Control and Security Management
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
A managed migration of people to Canada that facilitates the movement of legitimate travellers, while denying entry to Canada at the earliest point possible to those who pose a safety or security risk, or are otherwise inadmissible under IRPA Number of program integrity exercises reportedFootnote 18 ≥50 Calendar year end 2018
Number of Temporary Resident Visa, study and work applications assessed TBC based on operational capacity End of each calendar year
Number of Electronic Travel Authorizations (eTA) applications assessed 3.2M End of each calendar year
Number of Permanent Resident applications assessed TBC based on operational capacity End of each calendar year
Percentage of applicants whose criminal history (in Canada) was revealed using biometric screening TBD based on baseline established in 2019/2020 Fiscal year end 2020
Program 4.2.1: Identity Management
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
The identity of applicants is established and verified across the immigration continuum Percentage of applicants biometrically enrolled over the entire volume of immigration and refugee (IRPA) applications TBD in 2020 Calendar year end 2020
Percentage of biometric enrolments that matched existing Canadian records (i.e., immigration or refugee records) TBD based on baseline established in first evaluation in 2015/16 5 years after project implementation (2015/16)
Program 4.2.2: Eligibility and Admissibility Screening, Status and Documents
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Travel is facilitated for legitimate permanent residents, temporary residents and visitors Number of Permanent Resident Status documents issued (Permanent Resident cards and Permanent Resident Travel Documents) TBC based on operational capacity End of each calendar year
Number of eTAs issued 3.2M End of each calendar year
Number of Temporary Resident Visa, study and work applications issued TBC based on operational capacity End of each calendar year
Number of Temporary Resident Permits issued TBC based on operational capacity End of each calendar year
Inadmissible foreign nationals are identified prior to arrival in Canada Number of eTAs denied on safety or security grounds To be established in 2016 once baseline information is available End of each calendar year
Percentage of Temporary Resident Visa, study and work applications refused on safety and security grounds against total of Temporary Resident Visa, study and work applications assessed 0.04%–0.06% End of each calendar year
Percentage of Permanent Resident applications refused on safety and security grounds against total PR applications assessed 0.15%–0.3% End of each calendar year
Program 4.2.3: Global Assistance for Irregular Migrants
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Migrants who are determined to be destined to Canada through human smuggling operations are returned to and reintegrated in their countries of origin Percentage of irregular migrants surveyed following return and reintegration who report no further intention to migrate illegally ≥ 80% End of each fiscal year
Percentage of irregular migrants surveyed who report they have satisfactorily reintegrated upon voluntarily returning ≥ 80% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to lead efforts to facilitate the temporary entry of low-risk travellers and business visitors.
  • Move toward eliminating the visa requirement for Mexico and study the implications of phasing out visa requirements for certain other countries as well.
  • Monitor the implementation and performance of the Electronic Travel Authorization. Electronic Travel Authorizations are an easy and quick application process for visa-exempt air travellers from countries other than the United States. This new requirement becomes mandatory on March 15, 2016, using a phased approach to facilitate the process for travellers who are unaware of the new requirement.
  • Continue to expand and monitor biometric collection, screening and verification to confirm the identity of all visa- and permit-required temporary and permanent resident travellers seeking entry to Canada.
  • Continue the work to align admissibility policies and programs to support the broader Government of Canada agenda.
  • Develop and begin implementing a plan to efficiently manage visa applications and reduce processing times.
  • Continue to implement the Canada-U.S. Perimeter Action Plan.

Program 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda

As part of its mandate, IRCC aims to influence the international migration and integration policy agenda. This is done by developing and promoting, together with other public policy sectors, Canada’s positions on international migration, integration and refugee protection issues through meetings with multilateral and bilateral partners, membership in international organizations, and participation in regional forums.

IRCC works closely with bilateral partners to ensure the effective management of migration and administration of immigration laws through an exchange of information, including biometric data. This international migration policy development helps Canada advance its interests with respect to international migration as well as meet its international obligations and commitments.

IRCC supports international engagement and partnerships through membership in and contributions to such organizations as the International Organization for Migration, Regional Conference on Migration, the UNHCR, the Five Country Conference, the Global Forum on Migration and Development, and the Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees. The program uses transfer payment funding for the following: Migration Policy Development Program (grants), and membership in the International Organization for Migration (annual assessed contributions) and the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) (annual assessed contributions) formerly called the Task Force for International Cooperation on Holocaust Education, Remembrance and Research (ITF).

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 4.3
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   34 34 34
Spending 5,908,956 5,908,956 5,882,403 5,882,475

Performance Measurement – Program 4.3

Program 4.3: Canadian Influence in International Migration and Integration Agenda
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to be Achieved
Canadian positions on managed migration, integration, and international protection are advanced in international fora Percentage of decisions/reports from international meetings and fora identified as importantFootnote 19 that reflect the delivered IRCC migration-related position ≥ 60% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights
  • Continue to build and maintain strong relationships with partners abroad in order to advance Canada’s international immigration, humanitarian and information-sharing interests with countries and organizations such as the United States of America and the International Organization for Migration.
  • Continue to engage Canadian missions abroad in the delivery of the International Strategy through reporting on international migration trends, bilateral relationships, and core networking and liaison activities such as those undertaken with the Global Forum on Migration and Development, the Five Country Conference and the Intergovernmental Consultations on Migration, Asylum and Refugees.

Program 4.4: Passport

IRCC is accountable for the Passport Program, and collaborates with Service Canada and Global Affairs Canada to provide passport services that enable eligible Canadian travellers to access other countries. Through an extensive service delivery network in Canada and abroad, the program disseminates information, collects and processes Canadian travel document applications, authenticates applicants’ identity and determines eligibility, and issues secure Canadian travel documents. The program also performs activities to ensure that fraud and misuse of travel documents are prevented and detected. The Canadian passport is an internationally recognized and respected travel and identification document for Canadians who travel abroad, and is relied upon in Canada and by foreign governments to support the bearer’s claim to Canadian citizenship. The program operates on a full cost-recovery basis from fees charged for travel document services. Fees are collected in the Passport Program Revolving Fund and are efficiently managed to ensure value-for-money for Canadians.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 4.4
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   632 632 758
Gross Expenditures
Respendable Revenue
Net Revenue
482,010,132
(666,218,000)
(184,207,868)
482,010,132
(666,218,000)
(184,207,868)
490,631,819
(662,106,000)
(171,474,181)
421,775,207
(208,078,000)
213,697,207

Surpluses for a revolving fund are shown as negative expenditures against the fiscal framework; that is, revolving fund surpluses reduce draws on government resources.

Surpluses are projected until 2017–2018, after which a deficit (expenditures that exceed revenues) is projected for 2018–2019. For 2017–2018, the projected surplus is $171.5 million, and in 2018–2019 the projected deficit is $213.7 million. This reflects a total decrease of $385.2 million in net revenue over these years due to the following items:

  • reduction in revenues of $454.0 million is due to the 10-year passport renewal policy wherein renewals will more likely occur every 10 years instead of every five years; and
  • this will be partly offset by a decrease in operating and modernization costs.

Performance Measurement – Program 4.4

Program 4.4: Passport
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Legitimate travellers are in possession of Canadian travel documents Number of confirmed identity fraud cases known to the Passport Program in a given year > 33 End of each calendar year
Passport Program meets the expectations of Canadian travel document holders Percentage of clients who indicated they were satisfied with services they received ≥ 90% End of each fiscal year
Planning Highlights
  • Enhance the security and integrity of the Passport Program by advancing the ongoing replacement of the current passport issuing system, by launching consultations with provinces and territories to establish electronic identity information links with provincial and territorial agencies, and by participating in shaping international passport standards aimed at facilitating travel and enhancing security.
  • Continue to ensure that the Program delivers passports and other travel documents in a manner that prevents fraud and misuse and delivers value for money for Canadians. Continue to issue close to 5 million passports and other travel documents within service standards and enhance the service experience for passport applicants by ensuring that the Passport Program service delivery network is efficient and flexible, and by continuing the development of an online service channel and automated workload management.

Program 5.1: Internal Services

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Human Resources and Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars) – Program 5.1
Resource 2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2017–18
Planned Spending
2018–19
Planned Spending
FTEs   1,473 1,421 1,402
Spending 189,249,864 189,249,864 177,523,121 173,720,219

Reduction in planned spending from 2016–2017 to 2017–2018 is mainly due to the following items:

  • reduction in funding for the Syrian refugee initiative from $8.1 million in 2016–2017 to $1.1 million in 2017–2018;
  • reprofile from 2015–2016 to 2016–2017 of $1.9 million for Entry Exit; and,
  • reprofile from 2015–2016 to 2016–2017 of $0.7 million for Information Sharing.

Planning Highlights

  • Advance IRCC’s Service Excellence Framework, which is founded on four pillars: excellent client service, managed workloads, managed risk and a managed work force. The goal of this work is to provide the best possible service to clients in a way that is efficient and protects program integrity.
  • Continue to undertake service improvements that modernize IRCC’s business and gain efficiencies in processing that are balanced by strong program integrity measures.
  • Continue to ensure credible, relevant and responsive internal service delivery and ongoing business process improvement.
  • Implement a privacy framework in order to meet privacy obligations and to promote a coherent and effective departmental approach for privacy protection. The privacy framework sets out key responsibilities for privacy and the protection of personal information at IRCC, establishes a common set of standards and practices for the handling of personal information across the Department, and identifies core privacy risk management practices.
  • Continue entrenching the principles of Blueprint 2020 to strengthen the Department’s culture of self-reflection and continuous improvement, such as through the Red Tape Reduction Action Plan.
  • Continue to streamline IRCC’s committee structure and senior management strategic decision-making and approval processes in order to strengthen accountability and more effectively support the delivery of IRCC programs and services.
  • Continue to enhance direct communications to employees in operational manuals, guides and other tools used in the delivery of IRCC programs.
  • Continue to enhance the strategic partnership between human resources professionals and managers to support the implementation of a robust People Management Strategy.
  • Continue to align the Department’s security policy suite with updates being made to the Treasury Board Policy on Government Security in order to strengthen IRCC’s security management practices.
  • Reinforce compliance with IRCC’s Fraud Management Policy Framework that took effect in 2015–2016. The Framework provides an overarching structure for relevant IRCC and Government of Canada policy instruments and guidelines related to fraud. It outlines key activities, roles and responsibilities in the prevention, detection, assessment and reporting of fraud, both internal and external to the Department.
  • Develop a wellness strategic plan to promote employees’ psychological and physical health, prevent harm linked to workplace factors and foster a culture of well-being in the workplace. The strategy will include the adoption of the National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety, following the results of the IRCC Psychological Health and Safety Gap Analysis completed in February 2016.

Section III: Supplementary Information

Consolidated Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The consolidated future-oriented condensed statement of operations provides a general overview of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s (IRCC) operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the consolidated future-oriented condensed statement of operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Report on Plans and Priorities are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ.

A more detailed consolidated future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on IRCC’s Web site.

Consolidated Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31 (dollars)
Financial Information 2015–16
Estimated Results
2016–17
Planned Results
Difference
Total expenses 2,681,655,525 2,638,648,044 (43,007,481)
Total revenues 649,323,199 676,168,812 26,845,613
Net cost of operations 2,032,332,326 1,962,479,232 (69,853,094)

IRCC’s activities for both 2015–2016 and 2016–2017 will be strongly focused on meeting the Government’s current objectives of resettling Syrian refugees to Canada, with resulting impacts on allocation of resources.

Although responsibility for the Canadian Multiculturalism Act has been transferred to the Department of Canadian Heritage as of November 4, 2015, the planning and financial information under the Multiculturalism for Newcomers and All Canadians Program should be considered provisional.

The total departmental expenses are expected to decrease by $43.0 million or 1.6%, from $2.68 billion in 2015–2016 to $2.64 billion in 2016–2017.

The chart below outlines IRCC’s planned expenses by program for 2016–2017:

Planned Expenses by Program - image is described below
Text version: Planned Expenses by Program

The pie chart shows a breakdown of Planned Expenses by Program. The table below provides the percentages as indicated in the pie chart.

Planned Expenses by Program Percentage
Newcomer Settlement and Integration 45%
Passport 18%
Migration Control and Security Management 10%
Permanent Economic Residents 4%
Citizenship for Newcomers and All Canadians 3%
Family and Discretionary Immigration 3%
Temporary Economic Residents 4%
Health Protection 3%
Internal Services 8%
OtherFootnote * 2%
TOTAL 100%

Total departmental revenues are expected to increase by $27 million or four percent, from $649 million in 2015–2016 to $676 million in 2016–2017. This increase is primarily attributable to increased revenues in the Passport Program.

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2016–2017 Report on Plans and Priorities can be found on IRCC’s Web site:

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy;
  • Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More;
  • Disclosure of Transfer Payment Programs Under $5 Million;
  • Horizontal Initiatives;
  • Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects;
  • Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations Over the Next Three Fiscal Years; and,
  • Up-Front Multi-Year Funding; and

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

For any additional information concerning this or any other parliamentary report for IRCC, please contact ParliamentaryReports-RapportsParlementaires@cic.gc.ca.

Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation:
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
Budgetary expenditures:
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Performance Report:
Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.
Full-time equivalent:
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
Government of Canada outcomes:
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the Government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.
Management, Resources and Results Structure:
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
Non-budgetary expenditures:
Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
Performance:
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.
Performance indicator:
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance reporting:
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
Planned spending:

For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

Plans:
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
Priorities:
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
Program:
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture:
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
Report on Plans and Priorities:
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Results:
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
Strategic Outcome:
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
Sunset program:
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
Target:
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
Whole-of-government framework:
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.
Date Modified: