Who must submit to an immigration medical examination?

This section contains policy, procedures and guidance used by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada staff. It is posted on the Department’s website as a courtesy to stakeholders.

Permanent resident applicants

Foreign nationals who are applying for a permanent resident visa or applying to remain in Canada as a permanent resident must undergo a medical examination [R30(1)(a)(i)].

The only exceptions are most permanent resident applicants who are members of the live-in caregiver class (LC1), as per paragraph R30(1)(g). However, it is important to note that not all LC1 applicants are exempt.

Family members of foreign nationals

All accompanying family members of a foreign national who are applying for a permanent resident visa or applying to remain in Canada as a permanent resident must undergo a medical examination.

Foreign nationals sometimes have family members who will not go to Canada. With very few exceptions, these family members must also undergo medical examinations. The exceptions are listed in paragraph R30(1):

  • a family member of a protected person, if the family member is not included in the protected person’s application to remain in Canada as a permanent resident [R30(1)(e)];
  • a non-accompanying family member of a foreign national who has applied for refugee [R30(1)(f)].

Temporary resident applicants

If the duration of the visit is six months or less

A medical examination is not required unless the applicant intends to work in an occupation in which the protection of public health is essential. The following list provides examples of such occupations. This list is not all-inclusive.

  • Occupations that brings the applicant in close contact with people, namely:
    • workers in the health sciences field;
    • clinical laboratory workers;
    • patient attendants in nursing and geriatric homes;
    • medical students admitted to Canada to attend university;
    • medical electives and physicians on short-term locums;
    • teachers of primary or secondary schools or other teachers of small children
    • domestics;
    • workers who give in-home care to children, the elderly and the disabled;
    • day nursery employees;
    • agricultural workers from designated countries/territories. A country or a territory is designated if there is a "YES" in the column entitled "Immigration Medical Examination (IME) required" in the designated country and territory list.

If the duration of the visit is more than six months

In the calculation of whether a stay will exceed six months, real or planned absences from Canada of less than 14 days do not affect the determination.

A medical examination is required for:

  • Occupations in which the protection of public health is essential, which bring the applicant in close contact with people, namely:
    • workers in the health sciences field;
    • clinical laboratory workers;
    • patient attendants in nursing and geriatric homes;
    • medical students admitted to Canada to attend university;
    • medical electives and physicians on short-term locums;
    • teachers of primary or secondary schools or other teachers of small children;
    • domestics;
    • workers who give in-home care to children, the elderly and the disabled;
    • day nursery employees.

Reminder: For these occupations, a medical examination is required regardless of length of stay.

  • Persons who, in the one-year period before they seek entry to Canada or apply for a visa or permit, have spent more than six consecutive months in a country for which a medical examination is required.
  • Students (except medical and health care students) do not need a medical examination unless they are from a country requiring a medical examination.

Work permit applicants under International Experience Canada

  • All International Experience Canada applicants, regardless of nationality must undergo an IME if they plan to work in a designated occupation, regardless of the duration of their work permit. IEC applicants must also undergo an IME if they have lived or travelled in certain countries or territories for six months or more and plan to work or reside in Canada for more than six months.
  • Applicants planning to work in specific occupations involving close contact with vulnerable population must always do a medical exam.
  • Applicants who completed the medical examination must attach the Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary form [IMM 1017] or eMedical Information Sheet provided by their Panel Physician and upload it into the Proof of Medical examination or Optional documents slot.
  • To prevent applicants’ medical results from expiring before they have received an Invitation to Apply (ITA), they should be encouraged to wait until they receive their ITA before proceeding with a medical examination.
  • Applicants who require a medical examination, but are unable to get one within the 20-day deadline, may submit proof, with their work permit application, that they have scheduled an appointment with a panel physician approved by IRCC. The submission of either the Medical Report – Client Biodata and Summary form or the proof of a scheduled appointment will alert the processing office that medical results must be received before a final decision can be made.

Other situations that require medical exams

  • Foreign nationals who an officer, or the Immigration Division, has reasonable grounds to believe are inadmissible under section A38 (for example, persons who answer “yes” to the questions about medical problems or exposure to tuberculosis on the application form).
  • Persons who are applying for a “Parents and Grandparents Extended Stay Temporary Resident Visa (super visa)—regardless of the duration of the visit or whether the applicant is from a designated country.
  • Temporary residents seeking medical treatment in Canada may need a medical examination.

Note: A temporary resident in a life-threatening emergency, going to a hospital specializing in treatment unavailable elsewhere, may merit expedited case processing. If an officer is satisfied that payment for the treatment is guaranteed and that it will not displace Canadians awaiting treatment, a complete immigration medical examination may not be necessary. However, officers may wish to consult with a medical officer prior to making their decision. Airlines carrying such individuals may need to be informed of the nature of the condition and officers should advise the temporary resident to notify the airline before travel to avoid complications during travel.

Refugees

  • Foreign nationals who claim refugee protection in Canada [R30(1)(a)(v)];
  • Foreign nationals who are seeking to enter or remain in Canada and who may apply to the Minister for protection under subsection A112(1), other than foreign nationals who have not left Canada since their claim for refugee protection or application for protection was rejected [R30(1)(a)(vi)];
  • Refugee claimants and the members of their family in Canada must undergo medical examinations before they can work in Canada. See Applicants with no other means of support [R206].
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