Determining eligibility: Assessing local integration-central questions

This section contains policy, procedures and guidance used by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada staff. It is posted on the Department’s website as a courtesy to stakeholders.

The following questions should be central to any assessment of local integration. They describe a minimum standard that should help officers distinguish between applicants who are locally integrated (or who are likely to become so in a reasonable period of time) and those who are not:

Q1 Does the applicant (whether or not legally recognized by the state as a Convention refugee) face a significant possibility of refoulement or deportation to the country of origin now or in the foreseeable future?

YES.  Therefore, the applicant does not have a prospect of local integration in a reasonable period of time. Move on to assess other possible durable solutions.

NO.  Go to Q2.

Q2 Does the applicant have a well-founded fear of persecution in the country of refuge on one of the Convention grounds?

YES.  Therefore, the applicant does not have a prospect of local integration in a reasonable period of time. Move on to assess other possible durable solutions.

NO.  Go to Q3.

Q3 Does the applicant have access, or is likely to have access in a reasonable period of time and on a basis similar to nationals of the country, to all three of the following (participation in the economy to earn a livelihood?, property?, rental housing?)

YES.  Go to Q4.

NO.   Therefore, the applicant does not have a prospect of local integration in a reasonable period of time. Move on to assess other possible durable solutions.

Q4 Does the applicant have the ability to freely move in the country of refuge or is likely to have the ability in a reasonable period of time?

Note: The legal right to travel in and out of the country of refuge is not a requirement to be locally integrated for the purposes of applicant selection in Canada’s resettlement program.

YES.  Go to Q5.

NO.   Therefore, the applicant does not have a prospect of local integration in a reasonable period of time. Move on to assess other possible durable solutions.

Q5 Does the applicant have access, or will likely have access in a reasonable period of time and on a basis similar to nationals, to all three of the following (public health care?, social services?, elementary education for children?)

YES.  Applicant is probably locally integrated.

NO.  Therefore, the applicant does not have a prospect of local integration in a reasonable period of time. Move on to assess other possible durable solutions.

Note: It is important to compare the treatment of the applicant to that of nationals (see questions 3 and 5) since conditions vary widely from country to country. For local integration to occur, there should be no significant exclusion from access to the same opportunities available to nationals, such as access to job opportunities comparable to nationals with similar education and work experience. The legal permission to work without restriction is normally a sufficient indicator but where that does not exist then de facto access to employment or self-employment may be sufficient in some circumstances. Where a country has very limited economic conditions overall, it would be unreasonable to expect better treatment for refugees than nationals. Where a country treats some of its nationals significantly worse than others, the reference group should be the main population, not the mistreated minority.

If the officer completes all questions and reaches a positive response to question five, then the applicant is probably locally integrated or is likely to become so in a reasonable period of time. If the applicant is deemed to have a durable solution of local integration within a reasonable time, then they are ineligible for resettlement to Canada.

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