Temporary residents: Eligibility and admissibility considerations

This section contains policy, procedures and guidance used by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada staff. It is posted on the Department’s website as a courtesy to stakeholders.

Listed below are some areas officers should explore with applicants. The purpose of these questions is to determine whether:

  • applicants intend to remain in Canada illegally, claim refugee status or otherwise seek to remain in Canada, and not abide by the requirement to leave Canada at the end of the period authorized for their temporary stay
    Note : A person may have a dual or eventual intent to become a permanent resident, but in order to qualify for a temporary resident visa, they must demonstrate that they have the capacity and willingness to leave Canada at the end of the authorized temporary period (refer to dual intent).
  • the ties to their home country are sufficiently strong to ensure that they are motivated to return home after the visit to Canada
  • they meet the requirements of the Act and Regulations

Purpose and duration of the trip: Suggested questions

1. What is the purpose of your trip?

Things to consider:

  • What will the person be doing in Canada?
  • What are the applicant's plans for visiting Canada? Are the plans well thought out or are they frivolous?

Additional information:

  • If the applicant is interviewed, confirm the reason for the trip as stated on the application form.
  • Although not all persons visiting Canada will have detailed plans, they should normally have some idea of what they will be doing.

2. How long will you be staying in Canada?

Things to consider:

  • What is the duration of the visit?
  • Is the time requested limited? Indeterminate?
  • Considering the applicant’s situation in their home country and the purpose of the trip, is the time requested reasonable? Plausible? Practical?

Ties to Canada or country of residence

3. What ties do you have with Canada?

Things to consider:

  • Who invited the person to Canada? Is there proof of an invitation?
  • Does the person have family in Canada? If so, what is their immigration status in Canada?

4. What ties do you have with your country of residence?

Things to consider:

  • Is the person employed? If yes, at what salary? In what position? Has the applicant's employer approved a request for leave?
  • What family does the person have in the country of residence? Where were they at the time of the application?
  • Does the person have property? What is the value of the property?
  • What financial obligations is the person leaving behind? What is the nature and value of these obligations?
  • What other responsibilities and obligations is the person leaving behind? How will they be discharged?
  • Is travel consistent with local customs or practices? Has the person travelled before?

Additional information: Even if the person’s ties to the home country seem to be strong, there may be other factors in the general economic or political environment which make the long-term prospects for the person or their family unstable. Consider these factors in the assessment.

Documents and financial support

5. Do you have a valid passport or travel document? 

Things to consider: What is the expiry date on the passport or travel document?

Additional information: Refer to OP 16, Passports and Travel Documents.

6. How will you support yourself in Canada?

Things to consider:

  • Does the client have the means to be self-supporting or is someone else willing and able to provide adequate support?
  • Is the person staying in hotels or with relatives or friends?
  • Is it reasonable for the foreign national to be staying with the host for the period indicated?
  • Will the person be travelling within Canada? If so, for how long?
  • What is the source of funds: traveller's cheques or credit cards?
  • Are there currency restrictions in the home country?

Additional information:

  • Foreign nationals must have enough funds to maintain themselves in Canada without resorting to illegal employment or social assistance.
  • When foreign nationals are planning to stay with friends or relatives ensure that the host is willing and able to provide for the visitor during the stay.
  • The amount of money required will depend on the type and the duration of the trip.

7. Will you be able to leave Canada? 

Things to consider:

  • Does the person have the financial ability to return, such as an airplane ticket, money or a statement of bank assets?
  • Does the person have a passport, travel document and/or visa which will admit the person to the home country or to a third country?

Additional information: Persons who require a visa to re-enter their home country or a third country will be limited at the POE to a visit that does not exceed the validity of their re-entry visa.

8. Do you intend to work or study in Canada?

Things to consider: Does the client have a valid work or study permit?

Additional information: Most foreign nationals who work or study in Canada must have their work or study permit approved before arriving in Canada. Refer to Students, or Temporary Foreign Worker Guidelines.

9. Have you ever been convicted of a criminal offence? 

Things to consider:

  • Is the person described under the criminality sections of the Act? [A33, A36, A37]?
  • Is the person described under the security provisions of the Act? [A33, A34, A35]?
  • Has the person provided biometric information and, if so, what are the results of the biometric checks? [A33, A34, A35, A36, A37, R12.1]

Additional information:

  • For more information, refer to ENF 2/OP 18, Evaluating Inadmissibility, and ENF 14/OP 19, Criminal Rehabilitation.
  • For more information, refer to ENF 2/OP 18, Security Vetting of Visitors, for details on security screening for visitors.
  • For more information, refer to BP 1, Biometric Procedures and ENF 2/OP 18.

10. Do you suffer from a serious medical condition?

Things to consider: Does the person meet the medical requirements under R30?

Additional information: For more information, refer to medical requirements.

11. Have you ever been refused a temporary resident visa to travel to Canada? 

Things to consider: Has the person provided biometric information and, if so, what are the results of the biometric checks?

Additional information:

  • The answer will help you determine if the person has a temporary intent and will also support a potential refusal under the requirement to answer truthfully [A16(1)].
  • For more information, refer to BP 1, Biometric Procedures.

12. Were you ever removed from Canada or any other country?

Things to consider:

  • Has the person provided biometric information and, if so, what are the results of the biometric checks?
  • Does the person require authorization to return to Canada?

Additional information: For more information, refer to ENF 2/OP 18, Evaluating Inadmissibility and BP 1, Biometric Procedures

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